or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple exploring device pairing with Touch ID, camera privacy using diffusers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple exploring device pairing with Touch ID, camera privacy using diffusers

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
A pair of newly released patent applications detail potential future capabilities for Apple devices, with the first detailing a system by which two devices could be paired using biometric information, like a fingerprint, while the second details a method to display camera information using electronic diffusers.

Patent


U.S. Patent Application number 20140068725, entitled "Wireless Pairing and Communication Between Devices Using Biometric Data," defines a manner in which users could take advantage of unique biometric information to authorize a connection between two devices. This could be used, for instance, in lieu of current authentication methods to pair two devices over Bluetooth.

Currently, authorizing a connection between two Bluetooth devices requires a user to enter a passcode, generally a randomly-generated series of numbers. Apple's patent would allow biometric information, like fingerprints from the company's popular Touch ID system, to substitute for those passcodes.

Apple's patent application, published on Thursday and discovered by AppleInsider, would also allow for the same biometric data to determine a specific level of access for paired devices. Pairing authorized by a fingerprint, for instance, may grant greater access than pairing authorized with a passcode.

Apple credits inventors Chang Zhang of San Jose, Calif. and Qing Liu of Mountain View, Calif. with the invention.

Patent


Meanwhile, U.S. Patent Application number 20140063049, entitled "Information Display Using Electronic Diffusers," defines a way in which optical diffusers located on top of a device's display or camera openings could be manipulated to display messages. The claim could enable several new features, mostly revolving around low-power message display.

In one instance, the diffusers could be manipulated to hide a device's camera from the user. Such a method could be useful as a low-power way to notify the user of the camera's activation state -- if the camera is on, for example, it would be visible.

This would be useful, Apple says, to provide built-in privacy protection for users. Another embodiment would use the configurable diffusers to change the light level of built-in flash units based on the ambient lighting in the area.

Apple credits inventor Joel S. Armstrong-Muntner of San Mateo, Calif. with the invention.
post #2 of 12

Sounds utterly useless

 

Next!

post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emes View Post

Sounds utterly useless

Next!

How so? I've been wanting something like this since the iWatch rumours started. I want a BT-enabled wearable to automatically unlock my iPad, iPhone and Macs when I'm in range and then then lock them again when I'm not. This would also mean that if an iPhone gets stolen while in use it will be locked almost immediately as the thief leaves the range of wearable.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


How so? I've been wanting something like this since the iWatch rumours started. I want a BT-enabled wearable to automatically unlock my iPad, iPhone and Macs when I'm in range and then then lock them again when I'm not. This would also mean that if an iPhone gets stolen while in use it will be locked almost immediately as the thief leaves the range of wearable.

And this is impossible to accomplish without transmitting your biometric data over an unsecured Bluetooth connection?

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emes View Post

And this is impossible to accomplish without transmitting your biometric data over an unsecured Bluetooth connection?

Are you asking a question or making a statement? Why would it be unsecured? Why would your biometric data need to be transmitted anywhere?

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emes View Post

And this is impossible to accomplish without transmitting your biometric data over an unsecured Bluetooth connection?

Are you asking a question or making a statement? Why would it be unsecured? Why would your biometric data need to be transmitted anywhere?

Exactly! The biometric data would never be passed -- rather a token could be passed, in the clear, and it would only work with a given set of biometric data known to both device.

Apple has related patents in this area to allow an iPhone to conduct a credit card transaction by passing a token instead of credit card data.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Are you asking a question or making a statement? Why would it be unsecured? Why would your biometric data need to be transmitted anywhere?

I was asking a question.

 

It might be secured, it might be totally open. Someone can still pick it up by accident.

 

In the third step: "Transmit Biometric Data to Device"

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emes View Post

I was asking a question.

It might be secured, it might be totally open. Someone can still pick it up by accident.

In the third step: "Transmit Biometric Data to Device"

Let's consider this for a second. We already have TouchID which not only securely transmit from the TouchID sensor to the secure enclave within the device but also doesn't record any biometric data but instead uses a hash. Now when Apple is going to all this trouble for a sensor in a device to their logic board in the same device why would you then assume the most likely path would be to send transmit your actual biometric data to a different device and to do it over an unencrypted path? Where is the sense in that?

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Let's consider this for a second. We already have TouchID which not only securely transmit from the TouchID sensor to the secure enclave within the device but also doesn't record any biometric data but instead uses a hash. Now when Apple is going to all this trouble for a sensor in a device to their logic board in the same device why would you then assume the most likely path would be to send transmit your actual biometric data to a different device and to do it over an unencrypted path? Where is the sense in that?

Where's the sense in the Apple Pippin?

 

I see your point though. My apologies; I must have misread the article


Edited by Emes - 3/6/14 at 8:35am
post #10 of 12
Would be so awesome if I could unlock, and login to all sites on my Macbook Air by using the Touch ID on the iPhone. Potential and opportunity is massive.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

How so? I've been wanting something like this since the iWatch rumours started. I want a BT-enabled wearable to automatically unlock my iPad, iPhone and Macs when I'm in range and then then lock them again when I'm not. This would also mean that if an iPhone gets stolen while in use it will be locked almost immediately as the thief leaves the range of wearable.

Yes! You can get separate Bluetooth devices now, but this is where an Apple iWatch would be great. In theory, you could set the watch to be the final arbiter of security, so, for instance, you would never need to enter a password, a fingerprint or even unlock your associated iDevice, as long as you were wearing the watch.

Edit: in fact, I'm going to stick my neck out and say, why wouldn't Apple release this?
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

How so? I've been wanting something like this since the iWatch rumours started. I want a BT-enabled wearable to automatically unlock my iPad, iPhone and Macs when I'm in range and then then lock them again when I'm not. This would also mean that if an iPhone gets stolen while in use it will be locked almost immediately as the thief leaves the range of wearable.

That would be Awesome!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Let's consider this for a second. We already have TouchID which not only securely transmit from the TouchID sensor to the secure enclave within the device but also doesn't record any biometric data but instead uses a hash. Now when Apple is going to all this trouble for a sensor in a device to their logic board in the same device why would you then assume the most likely path would be to send transmit your actual biometric data to a different device and to do it over an unencrypted path? Where is the sense in that?

No sense in that. I agree with you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Would be so awesome if I could unlock, and login to all sites on my Macbook Air by using the Touch ID on the iPhone. Potential and opportunity is massive.

Exactly. I'd love that!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

Yes! You can get separate Bluetooth devices now, but this is where an Apple iWatch would be great. In theory, you could set the watch to be the final arbiter of security, so, for instance, you would never need to enter a password, a fingerprint or even unlock your associated iDevice, as long as you were wearing the watch.

Edit: in fact, I'm going to stick my neck out and say, why wouldn't Apple release this?
I dont know why they wouldn't. It would be absolutely awesome! I hope they do!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple exploring device pairing with Touch ID, camera privacy using diffusers