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iPhones much more likely to be stolen, less likely to be broken or need replacement

post #1 of 62
Thread Starter 
Figures compiled by device insurance firm ProtectCell indicate that owners of Apple's iPhone suffer fewer broken screens and other device problems requiring replacement, but are far more likely to having their products stolen.



The firm, which has sold over two million insurance policies covering phones and tablets, issued a press release noting that iPhone users are 46 percent less likely to need a replacement device for any reason, as compared to other smartphone users.

Specific to screen damage or breakage, iPhone users are 11 less likely to request repairs. That suggests that, despite a delicate appearance, iPhones either are less prone to damage or their users take better care of them (or a mix of both). The firm's press release attributed the difference to "luck."



in addition to screen breakage, liquid damage, power surge melt downs and mechanical failures, ProtectCell also covers against theft or mysterious disappearance. In that respect, iPhones lead other smartphone owners with a 65 percent greater likelihood of going missing.



Apple has targeted the well-documented attraction of thieves to its products by introducing Activation Lock, a free new feature in iOS 7 that locks device activation to a users Apple ID, ensuring that any iOS device protected by a passcode can't be stolen and resold for easy export by thieves who plan to erase and resell the device.

Both Google's Android and Microsoft's Windows Phone lack any mechanism for similarly blocking reactivation of a stolen device by thieves, but devices using those platforms are currently much less likely to be stolen because they lack potential for easy resale.

Another fact floated by the company: replacement requests by insured tablet owners increased dramatically in 2013 over the previous year, with users being 90 percent more likely to request device replacement.
post #2 of 62
More likely to be stolen? What good would that do as long as the owner had implemented basic security measures, including "Find My iPhone".

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post #3 of 62

Thieves can't tell if any given iPhone has "Find My iPhone" enabled, whether or not the user will resort to it, or if any of the iOS 7 security functions are enabled. Smartphone theft is a crime of opportunity, not the Brinks Job.

 

Looking at various Q&A forums, it appears there is a certain percentage of folks who do not enable common and free security measures. 

Remember, the world is full of people who use "asdfasdf", "1111" or "1234" as passwords.

 

Heck, even Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer admits she doesn't even have a passcode lock on her iPhone.

 

If there are no security measures enabled, and the thief can turn off the phone or put it into airplane mode right away, it's almost untraceable and can be fenced overseas for a good amount of cash. There is no thriving international black market for Android handsets.

 

Also, even if a stolen iPhone is completely locked, it still commands decent value for parts.


Edited by mpantone - 3/6/14 at 5:32pm
post #4 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

More likely to be stolen? What good would that do as long as the owner had implemented basic security measures, including "Find My iPhone".

 

I think most iPhone users will accept that it got stolen and not bother with retrieval, even if it shows up on "Find my iPhone".  I don't think the iOS security features have really settled-in yet with users, and that most users don't realize that their stolen phone cannot be wiped out without knowing their AppleID password.

Lot of ignorance out there with Joe Consumer methink.


 

post #5 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

More likely to be stolen? What good would that do as long as the owner had implemented basic security measures, including "Find My iPhone".

Find My iPhone is a good precaution against a thief getting access to your data, but since it's quite easy to block as a phone bricking service (just turn the phone off or enter Airplane mode, then wipe it before connecting to the internet) and also since lots of people don't use Find My iPhone, or password protection, it's not really much of a disincentive for a thief to steal the phone in the first place.

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post #6 of 62
The infographics never lie. Never.

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post #7 of 62
My daughters iPhone 5c was stolen at middle school from a zippered jacket pocket in gym. I put it in lost mode through Find iPhone within an hour and it had a pass code.

After two weeks, Find iPhone wasn't pinged once and we bought another iPhone. IMHO, Find iPhone and Activation Lock did little to hinder the thief after reading that they can be bypassed by jail breaking the phone.
post #8 of 62
Off topic: This reminds me, has the new activation security measures built-in to OS 7 helped reduce iDevices being stolen?

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post #9 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by murraysc View Post

My daughters iPhone 5c was stolen at middle school from a zippered jacket pocket in gym. I put it in lost mode through Find iPhone within an hour and it had a pass code.

After two weeks, Find iPhone wasn't pinged once and we bought another iPhone. IMHO, Find iPhone and Activation Lock did little to hinder the thief after reading that they can be bypassed by jail breaking the phone.

Please demonstrate how to bypass Activation Lock.
post #10 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirwill4 View Post

Maybe they don't make claims as much because the screen is so small they just leave it in their pocket. Or because it's dead. Or maybe because old people are careful with their phones. Lol.

Maybe they don't make claims due to better myelination; improving impulse propagation thus leading to superior fine motor coordination; which is why they have superior intellect.
post #11 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

The infographics never lie. Never.

 

They can, but it just depends.  Here's a quick guid to tell if an infographic is accurate.

 

If they match what you want to be true then the infographics are legit.  If they don't match up with your preconcieved notions then they're obviously lies.

post #12 of 62
Quote:
 Please demonstrate how to bypass Activation Lock.

 

I haven't tested any method, but a quick google finds several ways: https://www.appaddict.org/forum/index.php?/topic/2015-how-to-jailbreak-and-hacktivate-bypass-activation-lock-with-ultrabreak-on-ip4/

 

-murray

post #13 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by murraysc View Post

I haven't tested any method, but a quick google finds several ways: https://www.appaddict.org/forum/index.php?/topic/2015-how-to-jailbreak-and-hacktivate-bypass-activation-lock-with-ultrabreak-on-ip4/

-murray

1) This is specifically for the iPhone 4, not the iPhone 5S you mentioned in your first post.

2) On that forum people still can't seem to make it work.

3) Since Activation Lock involves Apple's servers which is why it's tied to Find My iPhone how does this Ultrabreak get around that method.

4) I'm not saying it's impossible — like by using an invented, virtually represented IMEI instead of the one the phone actually has in HW — but with no information it seems rather suspect. Plus, I'd expect any such method that can get past Apple's server authentication for the activation would work across all devices with iOS 7, not just the iPhone 4.

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post #14 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by murraysc View Post
 

 

I haven't tested any method, but a quick google finds several ways: https://www.appaddict.org/forum/index.php?/topic/2015-how-to-jailbreak-and-hacktivate-bypass-activation-lock-with-ultrabreak-on-ip4/

 

-murray

Your google-fu is fail. Everybody who tried that in that very thread you linked said it didn't work for them.

 

Quote:
 Uhm, I don't think that works man. I tried and all it does for every boot is show the "Connect to iTunes logo" Also I developed Ultrabreak, I tried to add evasi0n7unther.deb but it would not work. 
Quote:
 "Unhandled exception has occured in your application. The system cannot find the file specified." I tried many ways to go DFU but Ultrabreak seems to not detect the iP4
Quote:
 Its not working for me i have iPhone 4 locked to Fido Canada and i dont have a Fido sim card so i wanted to hacktivate and jailbreak it on iOS 7.0.4 i did all the steps but my device can't get out recovery mode.
Tried to jailbreak many time and then booting but device goes into recovery mode after each reboot??? 
 
Quote:
 i have also tested all this but same problem idevice stuks in recovry moo
Quote:
 tried evasion7 after the iPhone4_Hacktivate_Tool as described by Mongolo, didn't manage to unlock the cell.
tried ultrabreak but i'm stuck on the recovery mode in the middle of the jailbreak. it says something like the software aborted the mission, something like that, so i cannot boot.

 

And this is on a much older model, which I doubt Apple paid that much attention to when they developed Activation Lock. I suspect the 5s and 5c would be even tougher.

 

Maybe I'm overly cynical, but I suspect the supposed "jailbreak" is just malware that somebody is foisting on unsuspecting people who want some way to unlock a cell phone that they don't have activation credentials for, be it stolen or just forgotten.

post #15 of 62

Again, I have no idea if it's possible, but here's another forum: http://www.sinfuliphone.com/showthread.php?t=10024803

 

Quote:
 Hello guys. I've received my iPhone 5 as a gift. Everything great, I really enjoyed it. Yesterday I tried to do a full software update to the newest iOS and to erase everything, to make it as new. The only problem is, I didn't know that the Find my iPhone thing was ON, and now I'm stuck in an setup activation screen that requests the apple id and password that was linked to this phone, wich I do not have and I also can't track the person who had it, in no possible way. 

My question is: Is there a solution or fix for this Activation Lock? And if not, where can I check for updates regarding this matter?

 

If it wasn't possible to bypass in the first place, how was the author able to use the iPhone 5??

post #16 of 62

The story sounds fake.

 

The poster probably bought a stolen iPhone from eBay/Craigslist/whatever, is trying to get that forum's participants to explain how to break the iOS 7 Apple ID lockout.

 

Here's the key phrase that points to an illicitly acquired device:

 

Quote:
requests the apple id and password that was linked to this phone, wich I do not have and I also can't track the person who had it, in no possible way. 

There are tons of this kind of "help be unlock my iPhone" threads in various online forums like Yahoo Answers, whatever.

 

Frankly, your account is suspicious. You join today and the first and only thread you post on is about "stolen" iPhones and how to break into them. Other forums are littered with accounts just like yours, people asking how to crack a locked iPhone in their initial and only post, and without any answers, the account is abandoned forever.


Edited by mpantone - 3/6/14 at 9:16pm
post #17 of 62

Knowing that the person who stole my iPhone can't use it is of little comfort to my empty pocket.  I don't think the knowledge that stealing iPhones might be pointless has filtered through to the frontline criminal fraternity yet.

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post #18 of 62

Also, after canceling the old contract at the service provider and purchasing the new iPhone, I received this email from Apple during the process:

 

Find My iPhone has been disabled on X’s iPhone.
With Find My iPhone disabled, this device can no longer be located, placed in Lost Mode, or remotely erased using icloud.com/find or the Find My iPhone iOS app.
In addition, your Apple ID and password will no longer be required for someone to erase, reactivate, and use your iPhone.

 

I know I entered my iCloud password into the new phone, but I never specifically disabled Find My iPhone for the stolen device.  

 

Bottom line, the iPhone was stolen and the protections that Apple have in place did nothing to help recover it.  

post #19 of 62

I'd like to add, Apple could benefit Find My iPhone by not allowing the device to be turned off without a passcode.  As mentioned earlier, the thief must have turned the phone off soon after taking it and didn't access a network for 2 weeks.

post #20 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

Knowing that the person who stole my iPhone can't use it is of little comfort to my empty pocket.  I don't think the knowledge that stealing iPhones might be pointless has filtered through to the frontline criminal fraternity yet.

 

Stealing an iPhone isn't pointless if it's possible to convince an unsuspecting buyer to give you cash.  Far from it.

post #21 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The firm, which has sold over two million insurance policies covering phones and tablets, issued a press release noting that iPhone users are 54 percent less likely to need a replacement device for any reason, as compared to other smartphone users.

Whatever helps Google's activation count.
post #22 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

Frankly, your account is suspicious. You join today and the first and only thread you post on is about "stolen" iPhones and how to break into them. Other forums are littered with accounts just like yours, people asking how to crack a locked iPhone in their initial and only post, and without any answers, the account is abandoned forever.

 

Yes, I joined today because I felt like reporting a real world experience and how Find My iPhone did nothing to recover a stolen iPhone.

 

Can you point to where I asked how to crack a locked iPhone??   You may want to reread my first post and reconsider your suspicions.  

post #23 of 62

Your original post could be a trick, just to draw in someone else to post a hint about how to crack the iOS activation lock.

 

People in these sort of tech forums love to show off how much they allegedly know, even if they are completely wrong.

 

Making a post about how a family member's phone was stolen might incite other forum participants to get into a "yes you can, no you can't" war of words, inciting people to post examples of how it could/could not be done in an escalating game of one-upmanship. Par for the course in Internet 2014. You really don't need to ask the question. For a topic like this one, the implied statement is that iOS 7 handsets are unbreakable by thieves. That automatically invites people to refute that claim.

 

Again, your abrupt and sudden appearance in this stolen phone thread is highly similar to countless other threads I've read on the topic in tech forums all over the Internet: the one-time, drive-by Q&A posting.

 

But hey, maybe you'll prove me wrong and you'll stick around the AppleInsider forum for 7+ years, posting on the average of less than one post per month on a variety of topics. It has been done before.


Edited by mpantone - 3/6/14 at 9:59pm
post #24 of 62
Highly suspect data. Why? Insurance firm so only data they have is client claims. Many folks have insurance just to cover lost/theft and apple care for breaking. So the claims could be skewed

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post #25 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

Thieves can't tell if any given iPhone has "Find My iPhone" enabled, whether or not the user will resort to it, or if any of the iOS 7 security functions are enabled. Smartphone theft is a crime of opportunity, not the Brinks Job.

Looking at various Q&A forums, it appears there is a certain percentage of folks who do not enable common and free security measures. 
Remember, the world is full of people who use "asdfasdf", "1111" or "1234" as passwords.



Not on an Apple ID. System blocks such combos.

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post #26 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by murraysc View Post

I haven't tested any method, but a quick google finds several ways: https://www.appaddict.org/forum/index.php?/topic/2015-how-to-jailbreak-and-hacktivate-bypass-activation-lock-with-ultrabreak-on-ip4/

-murray

ALL of which are bogus as they miss that the lock is on the server. And that forum in particular is full of folks saying the trick just tosses phone into recovery mode

There is only one way to bypass the lock. Be lucky enough to steal an iOS device where the email used for the id is also on the device and the owner doesn't have a passcode. Then you can, if you are quick enough, request a password reset and retrieve the email etc before the owner can remote wipe phone.

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post #27 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post
 

 

They can, but it just depends.  Here's a quick guid to tell if an infographic is accurate.

 

If they match what you want to be true then the infographics are legit.  If they don't match up with your preconcieved notions then they're obviously lies.

 

You are so right with all the parts of your post I agree with but the rest is bunk. :-)

post #28 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by murraysc View Post

Again, I have no idea if it's possible, but here's another forum: http://www.sinfuliphone.com/showthread.php?t=10024803


If it wasn't possible to bypass in the first place, how was the author able to use the iPhone 5??

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post #29 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

Your original post could be a trick, just to draw in someone else to post a hint about how to crack the iOS activation lock.

 

People in these sort of tech forums love to show off how much they allegedly know, even if they are completely wrong.

 

Making a post about how a family member's phone was stolen might incite other forum participants to get into a "yes you can, no you can't" war of words, inciting people to post examples of how it could/could not be done in an escalating game of one-upmanship. Par for the course in Internet 2014. You really don't need to ask the question. For a topic like this one, the implied statement is that iOS 7 handsets are unbreakable by thieves. That automatically invites people to refute that claim.

 

Again, your abrupt and sudden appearance in this stolen phone thread is highly similar to countless other threads I've read on the topic in tech forums all over the Internet: the one-time, drive-by Q&A posting.

 

But hey, maybe you'll prove me wrong and you'll stick around the AppleInsider forum for 7+ years, posting on the average of less than one post per month on a variety of topics. It has been done before.

 

LOL.  Nice theories.  

 

I hope you guys are right, that it can't be bypassed since it should reduce the number of thefts.  Unfortunately, it did nothing for me and it appears based on the email I received from Apple that I inadvertently unlocked the iPhone or setting up a new phone from the backup of the stolen device unlocked the original.

post #30 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

But hey, maybe you'll prove me wrong and you'll stick around the AppleInsider forum for 7+ years, posting on the average of less than one post per month on a variety of topics. It has been done before.

Welcome to my world!
post #31 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by murraysc View Post
 

I'd like to add, Apple could benefit Find My iPhone by not allowing the device to be turned off without a passcode.  As mentioned earlier, the thief must have turned the phone off soon after taking it and didn't access a network for 2 weeks.

 

Couldn't the thieves isolate the phone from signal until the battery runs out? 

post #32 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlor View Post
 

 

Couldn't the thieves isolate the phone from signal until the battery runs out? 

 

Sure, nothing is foolproof, but in my case, the iPhone was stolen during school and I think it would have been difficult to isolate it from any signal for a couple days.  Having the ability to turn it off is certainly far easier.

post #33 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlor View Post

Couldn't the thieves isolate the phone from signal until the battery runs out? 

Absolutely. Have you ever used (or attempted to use) a mobile phone in the Radiology department of a hospital?

Requiring a passcode to power off a device is moronic which is why I expect this in the next release of Android.
post #34 of 62

Finally something Samsung cannot emulate!

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post #35 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


Absolutely. Have you ever used (or attempted to use) a mobile phone in the Radiology department of a hospital?

Requiring a passcode to power off a device is moronic which is why I expect this in the next release of Android.

 

Could you explain why this is "moronic"?  Sure, there are ways around it, but I honestly believe this would have made it more difficult for the thief to hide my daughter's iPhone from broadcasting it's location.

 

ETA: Thinking about this a bit more, rather than turn the device off, the thief could pull the SIM card which should accomplish the same thing, no?

post #36 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Knowing that the person who stole my iPhone can't use it is of little comfort to my empty pocket.  I don't think the knowledge that stealing iPhones might be pointless has filtered through to the frontline criminal fraternity yet.

It's not about the financial loss; it's about the peace of mind for the iPhone owner.

If your house burns down and you lose a life's worth of photos, you're not lamenting the financial loss; you're lamenting the loss of the memories. The financial loss can be insured; the photos are irreplaceable.
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post #37 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post


It's not about the financial loss; it's about the peace of mind for the iPhone owner.

If your house burns down and you lose a life's worth of photos, you're not lamenting the financial loss; you're lamenting the loss of the memories. The financial loss can be insured; the photos are irreplaceable.

 

And I don't even have that "peace of mind" since I received the email from Apple stating that Find My iPhone was disabled for that device while setting up the new phone.  Even without that, I'm guessing the thief still got rewarded by selling the phone to an unsuspecting buyer.

post #38 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post


It's not about the financial loss; it's about the peace of mind for the iPhone owner.

If your house burns down and you lose a life's worth of photos, you're not lamenting the financial loss; you're lamenting the loss of the memories. The financial loss can be insured; the photos are irreplaceable.

Don't understand why this is in response to me.  I didn't mention financial loss.

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post #39 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Don't understand why this is in response to me.  I didn't mention financial loss.

You said that someone stole your iPhone; isn't that financial loss?
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post #40 of 62

No, it's iPhone loss.  Financial loss is part of it, but I didn't say it was the only thing, which seems to be what you're implying I said.

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