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iOS 7.1 warning message reminds users of 15-minute in-app purchase window

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Apple's recently-released iOS 7.1 update now shows a pop-up warning message for users making in-app purchases for the first time, reminding them of a 15-minute grace period in which additional purchases can be made without reentering password.

In-app Purchase


As seen above, the iOS 7.1 update's informational message, which informs users of Apple's in-app content policies, is displayed after completing an initial purchase.

The pop-up offers direct access to iOS device Settings, where users can apply in-app purchase limitations, including an option to require passwords for every buy. Alternatively, users can turn off in-app purchasing altogether.

While the 15-minute no-password window has been in effect since the iOS App Store launched in 2008, some users may not be aware of the policy. Apple recently settled a lawsuit leveled by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission over the company's implementation of in-app purchasing. The government body argued that the current system made it too easy for children to make purchases without parental consent.

In 2013, Apple came under fire for the supposedly lax App Store policies. One high-profile case involved an 8-year-old British girl who managed to charge over $6,000 to her father's account with content bought through so-called "freemium" apps. Apple refunded the money.

Under the FTC settlement terms, Apple will refund some $32.5 million to parents whose children made unauthorized purchases. In addition, Apple agreed to change how the App Store operated to ensure purchases are being made from legitimate account holders. A report last week claimed the company was having technical difficulties in implementing the modifications, however, as the Mar. 31 settlement deadline approaches.
post #2 of 21
FTC is only claiming the credit for doing nothing and Apple on the record wanted to settle with those affected by this 15 minute download without any need to key in the password way before any action taken by the FTC.
post #3 of 21
The real fix is to reverse the preference setting for what that dialog talks about. By default, you need to enter the password every time, and going to settings, you can increase the delay before needing to enter the password.

But that would slightly reduce how much money Apple makes.
post #4 of 21
Apple should counter-sue negligent parents.

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post #5 of 21
I blame parents for punching in a credit card number, not stopping to think about whether they themselves even understand the system, and then handing an Internet-connected device to small children unsupervised.

That said, anyone can make a mistake, and a change to reduce mistakes is a good change. Necessary? Well, how many other mistakes can one make with an Internet device and Apple services? Should Apple warn you if you enter a phone number into a web form to "be sure you are not accidentally sharing personal info on a public forum"? Should iTunes Radio start with a warming that a loud song might follow a quiet song, damaging hearing if used with speakers/headphones set very loud?

So I can't see this change as necessary, and I don't see the FTC connection. But it's still a good thing!

Is the FTC giving Google the same March deadline? How is Google doing getting a fix out to their users? Because Android's problem is actually worse: a 30-minute window.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatisgoingon View Post

The real fix is to reverse the preference setting for what that dialog talks about. By default, you need to enter the password every time, and going to settings, you can increase the delay before needing to enter the password.

But that would slightly reduce how much money Apple makes.

 

In a world of Capitalism, Apple at least has some semblance of responsibility to customers and the environment. Whether it is reimbursing people for their own negligence of not monitoring their kids, or whether it is building products that are user friendly and have great accessibility options, or whether it is trying to reduce their carbon footprint.

 

To paraphrase Tim Cook, they do some things without worrying about the bloody ROI.

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by BestKeptSecret View Post
 

 

In a world of Capitalism, Apple at least has some semblance of responsibility to customers and the environment. Whether it is reimbursing people for their own negligence of not monitoring their kids, or whether it is building products that are user friendly and have great accessibility options, or whether it is trying to reduce their carbon footprint.

 

To paraphrase Tim Cook, they do some things without worrying about the bloody ROI.

No, I didn't phrase my original message right.  Right now, the default is your password is good for 15 minutes for purchases anywhere [both in the app store.  If Apple wasn't concerned about ROI, they would change the default to "immediately", and then the second time you do a purchase, you can enter the password or go to settings and change the setting.
 

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatisgoingon View Post

No, I didn't phrase my original message right.  Right now, the default is your password is good for 15 minutes for purchases anywhere [both in the app store.  If Apple wasn't concerned about ROI, they would change the default to "immediately", and then the second time you do a purchase, you can enter the password or go to settings and change the setting.

 

I agree with your comment both times you made it. It was perfectly clear what you said the first time. I find it very strange the default is backwards too, very un Apple and un Tim like.
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post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

Is the FTC giving Google the same March deadline? How is Google doing getting a fix out to their users? Because Android's problem is actually worse: a 30-minute window.

Google is facing their own class-action suit over the same issue Apple did, that in-app purchase window. Just like Apple they've resisted changing it anymore than they had to . Like Apple again they will have to modify it now.
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post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatisgoingon View Post

No, I didn't phrase my original message right.  Right now, the default is your password is good for 15 minutes for purchases anywhere [both in the app store.  If Apple wasn't concerned about ROI, they would change the default to "immediately", and then the second time you do a purchase, you can enter the password or go to settings and change the setting.

 
Because people would get super annoyed having to enter a bloody password every time they download from the App Store. But maybe the setting can/will change when more devices have Touch ID.
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


I agree with your comment both times you made it. It was perfectly clear what you said the first time. I find it very strange the default is backwards too, very un Apple and un Tim like.

No its not. Its called giving developers what they want and being competitive. In-App purchases are about making money, and in that 15 min window, both Apple and Devs are hoping you make many more 1-tap purchases without thinking it through. That's called making money.

 

Unsupervised children should not even be a factor here. I don't sympathize at all, and I have a three year old who routinely plays games that offer IAP. I know better than to enter my password to buy him something, and just give it back to him and walk away. That's my responsibility, as it is every parent's. I'm glad Apple took care of those few high profile cases, but its not their fault.

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post
 

No its not. Its called giving developers what they want and being competitive. In-App purchases are about making money, and in that 15 min window, both Apple and Devs are hoping you make many more 1-tap purchases without thinking it through. That's called making money.

 

No.  It's about the best user experience.  95% of users have control of their own devices and would opt for the 15-minute window approach.  If the default were to require a password every time, it would be very annoying for anyone making purchases.  And a large percentage of users never look at preferences and wouldn't know/remember that they have the option for the 15-minute window.  This would easily make a top 10 list of annoying iPhone behaviors--if the default were set the other way.

 

Having said that, the warning is an improvement.

post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Google is facing their own class-action suit over the same issue Apple did, that in-app purchase window. Just like Apple they've resisted changing it anymore than they had to . Like Apple again they will have to modify it now.

 

To Google's advantage, no one pays for Android apps.

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post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatisgoingon View Post

No, I didn't phrase my original message right.  Right now, the default is your password is good for 15 minutes for purchases anywhere [both in the app store.  If Apple wasn't concerned about ROI, they would change the default to "immediately", and then the second time you do a purchase, you can enter the password or go to settings and change the setting.

 

I think you have a cynical interpretation of Apple's intent. I would quickly find it tedious if I had to enter my password every time I wanted to review or pay for an app. I feel that the reason for the default was simply convenience.
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post #15 of 21
Shouldn't the warning say, "To change this, tap Settings > GENERAL, and go to Restrictions."?
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatisgoingon View Post

The real fix is to reverse the preference setting for what that dialog talks about. By default, you need to enter the password every time, and going to settings, you can increase the delay before needing to enter the password.

But that would slightly reduce how much money Apple makes.

 

Sorry, I don't see any setting like that in my preferences...

Oops, i need to update iOS then.

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

 

To Google's advantage, no one pays for Android apps.

 

Really?  Everything's free?  I better check it out...

post #18 of 21
I don't think I have ever made an in app purchase. I am constantly annoyed by free games "begging" for me to purchase things to make the game better or more fun. Piffle. Why not make the game fun to play all the time without forcing us to spend money? Just put some ads in there and maybe I'll click on some of them.
post #19 of 21
This whole default business is a pain in the neck. I think it'd be better if the dialogue that asks for your password for buying apps, media or IAPs had an extra option button:

1. Authorise once
2. Authorise for 15 mins
3. Cancel

Then everyone can choose what they want to do as they do it.

Also, once TouchID is deployed across all devices, it can be Authorise Once all the time, because using TouchID isn't close to as much of an annoyance as typing in a password.

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post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

This whole default business is a pain in the neck. I think it'd be better if the dialogue that asks for your password for buying apps, media or IAPs had an extra option button:

1. Authorise once
2. Authorise for 15 mins
3. Cancel

Then everyone can choose what they want to do as they do it.

Also, once TouchID is deployed across all devices, it can be Authorise Once all the time, because using TouchID isn't close to as much of an annoyance as typing in a password.

Exactly.
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post #21 of 21
Why is Apple responsible for supervising everyone's children?

If the parents paid attention to their kids and the apps they used and the iDevices they use them on and their iTunes settings it would not happen.

Apple should counter sue for providing 'childcare services'.
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