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Google Drive slashes paid storage prices, turning up the heat on rival Dropbox

post #1 of 95
Thread Starter 
Google on Thursday announced drastic price reductions for its paid Drive subscriptions, with 100 gigabytes of cloud storage now costing just $1.99 a month, and 1 terabyte of data available for $9.99 per month, significantly undercutting the prices of rival Dropbox.



Google Drive already offered lower pricing than Dropbox, but the difference between the two services is now even greater: For individual Dropbox users, 100 gigabytes of cloud data runs $8.25 per month when billed annually, or $9.99 per month on a month-by-month basis. A 200-gigabyte Dropbox account runs $16.60 per month billed annually, while 500 gigabytes is $41.60.

Previously, Google charged $4.99 per month for 100 gigabytes and $49.99 per month for one terabyte, but with both now slashed to $1.99 and $9.99 per month, respectively, they are significantly cheaper. The search giant also offers storage levels of 10 terabytes and higher starting at $99.99 per month.

Google Drive also offers 15 gigabytes of complimentary cloud storage for free. That's a higher amount than Dropbox's starting 2 gigabytes, though that number can be increased through various methods, including referrals.

Dropbox is the current leader in the cloud file storage business, serving as the default storage and sharing platform for many. The service is available cross-platform, with dedicated applications available for Apple's OS X and iOS, as well as Microsoft Windows and Google's Android.

Google Drive


Dropbox was allegedly offered a nine-figure buyout by Apple as part of a personal pitch from late CEO Steve Jobs in 2009. That offer was rejected, and Apple ultimately went on to introduce its own iCloud service in 2011 which takes a different approach, focusing on seamlessly syncing data in the background rather than dealing with traditional file structures as Dropbox, Google Drive and others do.

Like Dropbox, Google Drive also has its own application for Apple's iOS, as well as an OS X desktop client. The service is also integrated with third-party applications such as VLC.

Other cloud storage solutions compatible with Apple's platforms include Box, Microsoft's newly rebranded OneDrive, and SugarSync. A Box personal account comes with 10 gigabytes for free, OneDrive includes 7 gigabytes of free storage, and SugarSync recently transitioned to a paid-only model.
post #2 of 95
Yeah but - Dropbox doesn't scan your data and make use of that.
post #3 of 95

Steve tried to convince Dropbox that file storage was a feature and not a standalone product.  Dropbox is going to learn that lesson the hard way as storage goes towards free over time

 

I would not be surprised if Apple doubles free iCloud storage to 10GB at WWDC  

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post #4 of 95

Not sure if dropbox will be able to hold on to their lead once the big boys like google and microsoft really starts to go after that market. It's only a matter of time before google starts to offer a free 100gb and at that point what will dropbox do? Microsoft, will not go that far but their pricing will be a lot more competitive than dropbox, that's for sure. Dropbox does not have other business that can help them support their cloud so they will suffer and lose their first mover advantage in the long run.

post #5 of 95
If it seems too cheap to be true... you are the product not the customer.
post #6 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Oak View Post

Steve tried to convince Dropbox that file storage was a feature and not a standalone product.

Even if implemented as a feature, must be multi-platform. Being platform-agnostic is the key of success of DropBox.
post #7 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradipao View Post


Even if implemented as a feature, must be multi-platform. Being platform-agnostic is the key of success of DropBox.

 

iCloud will never be multiplatform. It would in no way benefit's Apple's model, which is to increase the value of hardware through software features and ecosystem. iCloud is deeply integrated into all iOS devices (and OSX), the point of which is to make syncing of data seamless and configuration free. There's no way they can just "add" iCloud to Android, as an app, as it's a core part of iOS. And even if they could, it would be pointless. Apple doesn't make money through cloud services and selling your data. It does so through hardware sales. Google's business model, on the other hand, is advertising- which is completely dependant on being platform agnostic. 

post #8 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Oak View Post

I would not be surprised if Apple doubles free iCloud storage to 10GB at WWDC  

Meh. Unless it's at least 25GB free, with the option to purchase up to a TB, I would find it uninteresting and unimpressive.

post #9 of 95
Deleted (should have read article first!).
post #10 of 95

I’ve been wondering something recently.

 

Go back to 1994. 1GB drives were huge. Basically the largest available, right?

Fast forward to 2004. 1TB drives had just come out. 1000x larger.

And now in 2014, we have… 4TB. Where are our Petabyte drives? What happened here? I mean, even 10TB  seems like a meaningful thought, but nothing. Nada.

 

So Google being able to offer up this amount of storage seems insane. Think of the sheer number of drives! Think of the amount of physical space required! And I guess they assume the service will be used for at least a year per person, because terabyte drives are still $100.

post #11 of 95

Apple should compete here. Google Drive is where everyone is going. Apple has better security so I prefer it when I need my information to be secure. 

 

Google wants to scan your data so they can take your ideas and make money off of them before you can. That is in addition to advertising. 

post #12 of 95
I'm sorry, but as long as Google Drive's terms and conditions state that they can do whatever they want with any data you upload then they will never be used by me.

However, Dropbox's 2GB free storage is starting got look pretty stingy in 2014.
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post #13 of 95
just wait for yahoo to acquire dropbox to get a foot in the door.
post #14 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post
Google wants to scan your data so they can take your ideas and make money off of them before you can.

 

Any evidence of this ever happening?  Where does this stuff come from?

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post #15 of 95

I wouldn't use Google Drive if it came with 100TB of free storage... As if I want them digging through that much of my data?

Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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post #16 of 95
They probably have triple redundancy on their data. 2 hot drives and 1 cold.
So if a 1TB drive costs $100, that's $100x3 = $300.
Over a 5 yr life of the drive, the racks, mounts, processors, hardware, facilities, bandwidth, etc probably cost at least as much, say $300/TB.

That's $600/TB over 5 yrs.
$10/month x 5 yrs = $600

Is this a break even effort for ecosystem growth?
post #17 of 95

Yeah but what are Google's "no peek" prices?  What's that?  Oh, they don't offer that option.  Oh, right.

post #18 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

Any evidence of this ever happening?  Where does this stuff come from?

It comes from this.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/254638/should_you_worry_about_google_drive_privacy_.html
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post #19 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post
Google wants to scan your data so they can take your ideas and make money off of them before you can.

 

Any evidence of this ever happening?  Where does this stuff come from?

 

I don't know.  Ask Apple about Android.

post #20 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

Any evidence of this ever happening?  Where does this stuff come from?
If you listen to any interview with their execs. They tell you that they scan all data even google voice calls and voice mail. It's sliding right up to the creepy line without crossing it as one of them famously said. Nothing is free. If they weren't scanning it what would they gain, brownie points. That's not how they make their Billions.
post #21 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by schlack View Post

They probably have triple redundancy on their data. 2 hot drives and 1 cold.
So if a 1TB drive costs $100, that's $100x3 = $300.
Over a 5 yr life of the drive, the racks, mounts, processors, hardware, facilities, bandwidth, etc probably cost at least as much, say $300/TB.

That's $600/TB over 5 yrs.
$10/month x 5 yrs = $600

Is this a break even effort for ecosystem growth?

 

1TB drives are much less than 100.00. Furthermore Google would be buying drives at wholesale prices. 

post #22 of 95

My understanding is that Dropbox doesn't have their own infrastructure but buys storage from Amazon S3. (At least this was true when they launched). The cheapest rate Amazon charges is 4.3 cents/GB-mo, which means for somebody who uses 50 GB, that's $2.15, not counting transfer fees (5 cents/GB uploaded) and servers, and development, etc.

 

Basically, Google's ability to scale up is its huge advantage over Dropbox.

post #23 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

I'm sorry, but as long as Google Drive's terms and conditions state that they can do whatever they want with any data you upload then they will never be used by me.

However, Dropbox's 2GB free storage is starting got look pretty stingy in 2014.

 Heh heh, I have 11.5 GB from taking advantage of every freebie promo and test volunteer reward that they offered me about a couple of years ago.  That's free for life.

post #24 of 95
Dropbox doesn't scan your data.. as others have said.. Just not in the 'trusting' mood these days..
post #25 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by genovelle View Post


If you listen to any interview with their execs. They tell you that they scan all data even google voice calls and voice mail. It's sliding right up to the creepy line without crossing it as one of them famously said. Nothing is free. If they weren't scanning it what would they gain, brownie points. That's not how they make their Billions.

The problem right now is that their idea and my idea of where the "creepy line" sits are pretty different.

 

The problem for the future is that I have no idea where the next guy(s) that run the company will think the "creepy line" lies, but they will still have all that years/decades personal data that they can use. Even if I were to trust Schmidt & Co. now, do I trust some unknown future CEO?

post #26 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by plovell View Post

Yeah but - Dropbox doesn't scan your data and make use of that.

Is Dropbox's sole revenue source the fees paid premium users? If so, it would seem hard for them to compete with other cloud storage providers in terms of price per GB.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 3/13/14 at 5:45pm
post #27 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by sessamoid View Post
Even if I were to trust Schmidt & Co. now, do I trust some unknown future CEO?

 

IMHO, this is the best argument against Google's scanning/data collection practices and one that I've repeated many times in real life.

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post #28 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrayven View Post

Dropbox doesn't scan your data.. as others have said.. Just not in the 'trusting' mood these days..

Think again.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2048680/dropbox-takes-a-peek-at-files.html
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post #29 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post
 

Yeah but what are Google's "no peek" prices?  What's that?  Oh, they don't offer that option.  Oh, right.


LOL...somehow I don't think the people that post on this site are really part of Google's target market.

post #30 of 95

Wake me up when someone makes a tablet with 1TB internal storage

post #31 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Oak View Post

Steve tried to convince Dropbox that file storage was a feature and not a standalone product.  Dropbox is going to learn that lesson the hard way as storage goes towards free over time

I would not be surprised if Apple doubles free iCloud storage to 10GB at WWDC  

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Meh. Unless it's at least 25GB free, with the option to purchase up to a TB, I would find it uninteresting and unimpressive.


This disregards the fact that storage of books, movies, music, photos and tv shows in iCloud is effectively unlimited. Having said that, I am not averse to more storage for Data & Documents in iCloud.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I’ve been wondering something recently.

Go back to 1994. 1GB drives were huge. Basically the largest available, right?
Fast forward to 2004. 1TB drives had just come out. 1000x larger.
And now in 2014, we have… 4TB. Where are our Petabyte drives? What happened here? I mean, even 10TB  seems like a meaningful thought, but nothing. Nada.

So Google being able to offer up this amount of storage seems insane. Think of the sheer number of drives! Think of the amount of physical space required! And I guess they assume the service will be used for at least a year per person, because terabyte drives are still $100.

Quote:
Originally Posted by schlack View Post

They probably have triple redundancy on their data. 2 hot drives and 1 cold.
So if a 1TB drive costs $100, that's $100x3 = $300.
Over a 5 yr life of the drive, the racks, mounts, processors, hardware, facilities, bandwidth, etc probably cost at least as much, say $300/TB.

That's $600/TB over 5 yrs.
$10/month x 5 yrs = $600

Is this a break even effort for ecosystem growth?


This assumes that the consumer paying for Google Drive is the customer. Be assured that the paying customer is not the only revenue stream for Google Drive.
post #32 of 95

I wish Apple would bring back iDisk (or something similar).

 

Worked really well for me and I loved being able to host my website on it...

post #33 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emes View Post
 

Wake me up when someone makes a tablet with 1TB internal storage

:lol:

post #34 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

iCloud will never be multiplatform. 

And as such, it will never be a commercial storage solution because it doesn't work the way that business need. You can't store random files and you can't share them with others users on any platform. iCloud should not be compared to Dropbox or any of the other storage solutions. iCloud is very useful but also very limited so most businesses chose DB or GD for collaboration purposes.

 

And by the way, DB does scan your files and they will report you if they find anything illegal and they also reserve the right to delete files for any reason they choose. Furthermore they use Google Analytics so Google knows everything about your use of Dropbox.

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post #35 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


This disregards the fact that storage of books, movies, music, photos and tv shows in iCloud is effectively unlimited. Having said that, I am not averse to more storage for Data & Documents in iCloud.

This assumes that the consumer paying for Google Drive is the customer. Be assured that the paying customer is not the only revenue stream for Google Drive.
http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/25/2973849/google-drive-terms-privacy-data-skydrive-dropbox-icloud
A comparison of the the privacy protections of iCloud, Google Drive, Dropbox and Skydrive
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post #36 of 95
I like iCloud, but I miss the file storage capabilities Apple used to offer. This is another area where Apple brought a product to market, but abandoned it to let others take the mantle.
post #37 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post
 

 

Any evidence of this ever happening?  Where does this stuff come from?

 

From court cases where Google has acknowledged the practice. I will not do all the work for you, but here is one example concerning Gmail. 

post #38 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

And as such, it will never be a commercial storage solution because it doesn't work the way that business need. You can't store random files and you can't share them with others users on any platform. iCloud should not be compared to Dropbox or any of the other storage solutions. iCloud is very useful but also very limited so most businesses chose DB or GD for collaboration purposes.

And by the way, DB does scan your files and they will report you if they find anything illegal and they also reserve the right to delete files for any reason they choose. Furthermore they use Google Analytics so Google knows everything about your use of Dropbox.
Apple also scans your files uploaded to iCloud and reserves the right to delete content they determine is objectionable. They don't define objectionable.

FWIW they all probably scan the files you upload. If you have something particularly sensitive or valuable I don't know that I'd consider Cloud storage to be the ideal locker.
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post #39 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

From court cases where Google has acknowledged the practice. I will not do all the work for you, but here is one example concerning Gmail. 

You don't even need to search for little known court cases. Google is right upfront about what they collect and how it's treated. It's not a secret.
https://support.google.com/a/answer/60762?hl=en
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post #40 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post
 

 

From court cases where Google has acknowledged the practice. I will not do all the work for you, but here is one example concerning Gmail. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


You don't even need to search for little known court cases. Google is right upfront about what they collect and how it's treated. It's not a secret.
https://support.google.com/a/answer/60762?hl=en

 

Scanning your documents is much different then what was asserted.  The poster claimed that "Google wants to scan your data so they can take your ideas and make money off of them before you can" (emphasis mine).

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