or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › iBrary The Next iApp?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

iBrary The Next iApp? - Page 2

post #41 of 49
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by giant:
<strong>This is fake

As a librarian, I have more than enough contact with this to know how impossible licensing with online publishers is. You think music is bad, you have seen nothing. There is a lot of drama between publishers, librarians and authors right now. From proprietary formats to constricting license agreements, online publishing is in a horribly inaccessable place, even for a major library with massive funding like the one I work in. It is nothing less than a ****ing mess.

In other words, as cool as an idea as it is, there is no way that it is possible.</strong><hr></blockquote>

As a librarian you know about this then right?

eBrary: <a href="http://shop.ebrary.com/Top?layout=search&frm=smp.x&p00=&brw.x=23&brw.y=8" target="_blank">http://shop.ebrary.com/Top?layout=search&frm=smp.x&p00=&brw.x=23&brw.y=8</a>

Dave
Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
Reply
Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
Reply
post #42 of 49
If it's a fake, the person was pretty creative to come up with something no one else had thought of. Typical of an actual Apple idea, notice how many of us are pretty critical of it.

Imagine the possibilites: children creating story books that they can easily give a polished look to. They can "Publish" these books they have written to their school's "Public Library" or even an internet wide "Global Library."

There might even be a way to get a printed, hard-bound book of your story, just like with iPhoto.

The "iBrary" name may seem silly, but this project is exactly the kind of creative innovation Apple comes up with.

[ 10-28-2002: Message edited by: clonenode ]</p>
c l o n e n o d e
o n e o f m a n y
Reply
c l o n e n o d e
o n e o f m a n y
Reply
post #43 of 49
"The synthesis quality is outstanding, seemingly able to handle emotion quite well. "

Even if the application weren't a fake, this is. There is no way, absolutely no way at all, that a computer can keep track of what is happening in a story and thereby put emotion into synthesized speech. It might have a little more nuance than usual, but no emotion. So the person who wrote the rumor made that part up out of wishful thinking, or someone along the line did. When one part is clearly made up, I doubt the whole. Also, does anybody really believe that Apple would have named anything .ibook? Even as an internal data format? It would be constant confusion. The whole tone of the thing is that of a kid on the playground.
post #44 of 49
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by clonenode:
<strong>If it's a fake, the person was pretty creative to come up with something no one else had thought of. Typical of an actual Apple idea, notice how many of us are pretty critical of it.

Imagine the possibilites: children creating story books that they can easily give a polished look to. They can "Publish" these books they have written to their school's "Public Library" or even an internet wide "Global Library."

There might even be a way to get a printed, hard-bound book of your story, just like with iPhoto.

The "iBrary" name may seem silly, but this project is exactly the kind of creative innovation Apple comes up with.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Yep and while this might all be part of the 'hoax' but re-read the top line of the rumor report:

"This is a screenshot (I was told it was attached to a bug or report) of an Apple iApp currently in development."

Now what is that really saying...

This screen shot was attached to a bug report and I (person who leaked it) found it and sent it off to you (the rumors site).

The person who leaked it wasn't the one who took the screen shot. The person who leaked it just happens to have (or had) access to Apples internal bug reporting system at some point in time **OR** knew someone else who did. The rest of the text in the rumor report is 3rd person twice removed as far as I'm concerned... But the photo itself is something that we can talk about.

I've overheard that even Apples internal bug reporting system has had it's locks adjusted over the past few month. I'm guessing it went from being 'more open' (to Apple employees) to 'less open' but that's only a guess - a pretty good one I'd bet. Maybe it's leaks such as this that are/were the cause.

Now this takes care of a few concerns...

Q: Why is PB and IB in the dock
A: Because the screen shot was taken by someone working on the program.

Q: What is that ant eater icon?
A: Apples interface to the internal bug reporting system.

Q: Why would the person leave their name in the screen shot?
A: It was a programmer he didn't need to hide anything since that screen shot was just part of an internal Apple bug report.

I'm still not ready to say this is 100% legit but with the story I just painted it's not totally out of the question that this could be real...

Either it is real or the person who hoaxed this put some extra effort into the story line where it involved not just a simple 'screen shot leak' but also an internal Apple bug reporting system and a programmer that too a screen shot that was attached to a bug report filed into that system.

It could be a hoax but...

The person who did the hoax would STILL have to have access to an internal Apple program that interfaces to Apples bug reporting system (also internal). This isn't the same as the darwin bug base or even Apples external bug reporting system (as used by beta testers).

If it is a hoax then it had to come from someone who works (worked) for Apple.

Dave

[ 10-28-2002: Message edited by: DaveGee ]</p>
Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
Reply
Apple Fanboy: Anyone who started liking Apple before I did!
Reply
post #45 of 49
What are those 3 icons in the bottom left hand corner of the screen. I thought that feature was pulled out of 10.2
post #46 of 49
[quote]Originally posted by the cool gut:
<strong>What are those 3 icons in the bottom left hand corner of the screen. I thought that feature was pulled out of 10.2</strong><hr></blockquote>Yes, but it's rather simple to bring it back. Just replace the Dock.app with a version from an earlier developer build.
post #47 of 49
[quote]Originally posted by DaveGee:
<strong>

As a librarian you know about this then right?

eBrary: <a href="http://shop.ebrary.com/Top?layout=search&frm=smp.x&p00=&brw.x=23&brw.y=8" target="_blank">http://shop.ebrary.com/Top?layout=search&frm=smp.x&p00=&brw.x=23&brw.y=8</a>

Dave</strong><hr></blockquote>

You sent me a link to ebrary?!?!?!

ebrary is hardly a drop in the bucket. Anything you find as a consumer is hardly a drop in the bucket. Most of what is available electronically is only affordable to universities, and many, many times the prices and licensing conditions are even outrageous to us!

The conflict is extremely high-profile, at least in the publishing and library worlds. It's the most important thing going on in the publishing and library worlds right now. It is the most important copyright battleground, and publishers are stalling. I spend my entire day dealing with ebooks and electronic journals, and it is a royal pain. This is with a budget in the millions! The switch to digital is limiting the availablity of information to a shocking degree.

The differences in standards alone would make this thing useless.

Ebooks would be great if publishers created them in a logical and accessible way. Until then it would be idiotic to dump hundreds of thousands of dollars into such a constantly morphing and terribly *unstandardized* (think wild west) sector.

Anyway, that kind of screenshot is easy to make in photoshop. I'm sure we've all used that, ay?

Sorry to burst your bubble, but it's not realistic at this point or in the near future.

[quote]It works by browsing a local book repository, a public Internet library, or a global Internet library (dunno which repository) for books or periodicals. <hr></blockquote>

This is patently impossible, for hundreds of reasons, not least of which is the high restrictions that have to be scaled just to reach stuff you've already paid for. This shows an entire lack of knowledge of online publishing, the license agreements, the delivery systems and the many formats used.
.
.
.
That would be nice if it was realistic, though. I would love to see it someday, but it's not on the horizon yet.

[ 10-28-2002: Message edited by: giant ]</p>
post #48 of 49
[quote]Originally posted by roo:
<strong>

the average consumer does not like reading text on a screen for long hours, no matter how many technological advantages are present in the new device. personally, if i'm going off to the beach or park, do i want to take my precious laptop or some paperback i got at the library for leisure reading? paperback all the way. print will never die! </strong><hr></blockquote>

It is not on par with what I'm trying to say. I felt pretty the much the same way as both of you, even to the extent that if there is a bibliomaniac in here, it would have to be me (I can't pass a bookstore, or even better, a curiosum and second-hand bookstore, without having my money float right out of my pockets). I own about 700 books in print, but I also own about 1500 books on my HD (and backup cd-r).

It's only four weeks ago that I decided to, for fun, start reading one of the numerous e-books I have on my ibook screen (crispy still that screen, the book was fight club by one chuck palahniuk, not the type of literature I've grown accustomed to, but a thread on this board had gotten me curious). I'll tell you, it's truly wonderful; and not only for visually impaired. You have a wide array of possibilities at your hand, which you don't while reading print.
Admittedly, both have their advantages (and I'm far from about to chuck out my beautiful real world library), but I do feel that I have passed onto a new level of bibliophily: I can appreciate two different ways of reading now. A world of bibliophily where one race of books is not discriminated simply because it does not have the right smell or feeling, or even simple body mass.

There may be better devices to read a book on than an ibook (although LCD would have to be a must, I wouldn't want to read a novel sitting behind a brain-frying x-ray machine type of CRT like I'm sitting behind now), but still, a new world has opened for me.

[ 10-28-2002: Message edited by: der Kopf ]</p>
post #49 of 49
i am not saying that ebook technology does not have its place or potential. i believe that currently , the best applications for ebook technology is textbooks, research texts, etc-- not leisure reading. the current general populace does not enjoy reading text off of a screen nor are they willing to plunk down the change for such a device. some people here have written expounding the joys of ebook reading. i do not deny the ebook format its advantages, but most of the people here would not be classified as the average consumer.

i do not have a problem with ebooks. what i have a problem with is the whole hoopla pushing them as the paperback alternative. i could never understand why people decided that the best way to promote this technology was as the average man's tom clancy reader. why is it that i always saw it promoted like that, and was only slyly handed a cdrom containing a textbook? more attention needs to be paid to that application, if you ask me. i really look forward to seeing the improvements in this technology, and a better scheme for promoting it.

oh, coincidentally, i just got my latest issue of ID, and there's an article on epaper technology.
-qr
Reply
-qr
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › iBrary The Next iApp?