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iSync and non SE-phones (or: How does SyncML work?)

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I am thinking about buying a new cellphone and I want it to be compatible with my Mac and iSync.

And although some Nokia phones support SyncML they are not listed as iSync compatible. Has anyone made expiriences with non Sony-Ericsson phones and iSync?

How does SyncML work? I read that it is similar to XML or even XML based. Does this mean that, although SyncML is an open standard, apps (like iSync) have to be adapted to every phone?

How does GPRS-internet-access work on bluetooth-equipped Macs via cellphones?
post #2 of 12
<a href="http://www.syncml.org" target="_blank">www.syncml.org</a>
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by JPF:
<strong><a href="http://www.syncml.org" target="_blank">www.syncml.org</a></strong><hr></blockquote>

Thank you for the link. I thought someone could save me from going through all the detailed specs by gving me a brief and simple answer to my questions.
post #4 of 12
[quote]Originally posted by RolandG:
<strong>How does GPRS-internet-access work on bluetooth-equipped Macs via cellphones?</strong><hr></blockquote>

Bluetooth is used to emulate a serial link and the phone emulates a modem, so it's just like using a modem.
post #5 of 12
[quote]Originally posted by wmf:
<strong>

Bluetooth is used to emulate a serial link and the phone emulates a modem, so it's just like using a modem.</strong><hr></blockquote>

This is kind of misleading.. GPRS is always-on, instant, and leaps and bounds faster than traditional POTS/56k modem internet connections, not to mention there isn't a separate ISP in this instanceit's just your wireless service companyas if anyone could afford a separate ISP monthly fee, what with the exorbitant GPRS data pricing on most carriers ($3-10/MB). The phone would really just be acting as a receiver for the radio signal in this kind of scenario.

[ 11-26-2002: Message edited by: bradbower ]</p>
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post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by bradbower:
<strong>

This is kind of misleading.. GPRS is always-on, instant, and leaps and bounds faster than traditional POTS/56k modem internet connections, not to mention there isn't a separate ISP in this instance—it's just your wireless service company—as if anyone could afford a separate ISP monthly fee, what with the exorbitant GPRS data pricing on most carriers ($3-10/MB). The phone would really just be acting as a receiver for the radio signal in this kind of scenario.

[ 11-26-2002: Message edited by: bradbower ]</strong><hr></blockquote>

But does it work on a Mac? Where do I get the drivers from - most manufacturers don't suppot the Mac platform.
post #7 of 12
[quote]Originally posted by RolandG:
<strong>

But does it work on a Mac? Where do I get the drivers from - most manufacturers don't suppot the Mac platform.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Yeah, the Bluetooth is a part of the system, and the support for mobile phones' GPRS is already included in that... this document might be of help to you: <a href="http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=34745&SaveKCWindowURL=http%3A% 2F%2Fkbase.info.apple.com%2Fcgi-bin%2FWebObjects%2Fkbase.woa%2Fwa%2FSaveKCToHomePa ge&searchMode=Assisted&kbhost=kbase.info.apple.com &showButton=false&randomValue=100&showSurvey=false &sessionID=anonymous|158581463" target="_blank">Apple Bluetooth Preview Release: How to Connect to the Internet with a Bluetooth-Enabled Phone</a>. I see why the previous poster was saying that about the "modem," it just shows in the system as a "bluetooth modem" for the system network port.. and it actually is not using GPRS data, it's just using it as your phone line and a software modem to dial up your ISP. I actually cannot find anything on Apple's site about GPRS, which is kind of disappointing. Oh well, I guess I was wrong.

[ 11-26-2002: Message edited by: bradbower ]</p>
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post #8 of 12
The connection from the phone onward shouldn't matter. If Apple's Bluetooth implementation will talk to your phone, and allow it to be used as a modem, the actual connection type won't matter.

As for SyncML compatibility, if Apple implements the standard properly, and your cell phone manufacturer implements the standard properly (many don't; some Nokia models do, others don't) then they should be compatible.
Chicanery.
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Chicanery.
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post #9 of 12
[quote]Originally posted by Belle:
<strong>The connection from the phone onward shouldn't matter. If Apple's Bluetooth implementation will talk to your phone, and allow it to be used as a modem, the actual connection type won't matter.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Sure it will. The current implementation just uses the phone line, and Bluetooth to send instructions to the phone from OS X's modem software/drivers, and tell the phone to dial up to the ISP as set in the Internet Connect preferences, and so on and so forth.

GPRS is a far cry from that, but I wonder why there isn't any support for it.. maybe the prohibitive pricing? Still, it seems more logical to use GSM providers' built-in high-speed always-on digital data network technology than to just use the phone as a line for crappy dialup. Then, iSync is beta, so I should probably just shut my trap.
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post #10 of 12
Um, sorry, I don't follow what you're saying? According to Apple's Mac OS X site, Jaguar supports Bluetooth GPRS internet access. It's certainly listed in the bottom section of <a href="http://www.apple.com/macosx/jaguar/morefeatures.html" target="_blank">this page</a>.

I don't yet have a Bluetooth phone, so I can't try it myself.

[Edit: Okay, I've found out a little more. It comes down to the fact that GPRS access requires updated modem drivers, so although Apple supports GPRS in its Bluetooth implementation, it hasn't provided the drivers. If you do a little Googling, you can find new drivers for GPRS/Bluetooth phones.]

[ 11-26-2002: Message edited by: Belle ]</p>
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post #11 of 12
And although some Nokia phones support SyncML they are not listed as iSync compatible. Has anyone made expiriences with non Sony-Ericsson phones and iSync?

Yes i was lead to believe that the Nokia 7650 had SyncML and Bluetooth. All the connectivity that iSync needs i thought to myself.
But no, it wasn't that simple. Nokia in their greater wisdom(!) decided to only implement wireless SyncML (ie. via wap) and not local (Bluetooth) sync.
Also they failed to deliver OBEX in their Bluetooth layer which is needed for all the funky tricks OSX and SE can do (you know, SMS from the desktop etc.). They also neglected to open the API to developers so that 3rd parties can fill the bridge.
So my advice would be to either go with SE, compromise with a non-compatible Nokia or sit and wait for Nokia to pull their heads out their arses.
thinking different(ly)
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thinking different(ly)
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post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know about the Philips Fisio 800 series' Mac compatibility?

Now that Apple and SE announced a cooperation, did SE's Mac support improve? Do they offer drivers and software for their phones or do they leave it to Apple or third party developers as any other phone company?
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