or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › Canon Digital Camera ISO question
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Canon Digital Camera ISO question

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I'm using the Canon Powershot S330 (2 megapixels, 3x optical zoom) with a 128 Mb memory card. I'm really quite happy with the camera.

However, some of my still shots where people are moving turn out blurry. I don't really understand ISO but I know that higher ISO speeds capture movement better (I think).

I checked the camera settings and the default is ISO 50. I switched it to auto (ranges from 50-150 ISO).

I shoot at 1600 x 1200 resolution with minimal compression. I don't use the camera for video or sound. Oddly the ISO setting is under the video section.

Can someone explain to me the trade-offs of a higher ISO, and speculate why the default would be only 50 ISO. Thanks.

[ 11-28-2002: Message edited by: gobble gobble ]</p>
20" iMac G5, 2 GB Ram, OS X 10.4.11, .Mac
Reply
20" iMac G5, 2 GB Ram, OS X 10.4.11, .Mac
Reply
post #2 of 8
Higher ISO = more grain/noise, worse color, better for lowlight.
Lower ISO = smoother pics, better color, better for well illuminated subjects.
I can change my sig again!
Reply
I can change my sig again!
Reply
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Eugene,

I figured I'd hear from you, thanks. But does a higher ISO reduce blur? And is the auto setting correct for someone who doesn't want to change settings on a regular basis, or is 50 ISO (the default) better?


p.s. I remember you mentioning that your sister had scratched up the case of her S330. Well mine got caught in a sandstorm and had the crap kicked out of it. Fortunately it still works but for a while the battery case was wedged shut and the function dial wouldn't rotate. I also had water in the viewfinder but that later disappeared. A solid product, IMHO.
20" iMac G5, 2 GB Ram, OS X 10.4.11, .Mac
Reply
20" iMac G5, 2 GB Ram, OS X 10.4.11, .Mac
Reply
post #4 of 8
[quote]Originally posted by Eugene:
<strong>Higher ISO = more grain/noise, worse color, better for lowlight.
Lower ISO = smoother pics, better color, better for well illuminated subjects.</strong><hr></blockquote>

What he said.

This is exactly the same concept as film speed. You use ISO 200 for outdoor shots, 400 for inside and fast action shots, and 1000 for really dark, or really fast action. Of course, you pay for this sensitivity by having more film grain in your shots.

But let's really get to the point. You need to get rid of that piece of junk and get a manly camera: the <a href="http://www.bizrate.com/marketplace/search/search__cat_id--11510000,keyword--canon%20eos%201ds,de_id--200.html" target="_blank">Canon EOS 1Ds.</a>
Die Grüne Hölle - Gute Fahrt
Reply
Die Grüne Hölle - Gute Fahrt
Reply
post #5 of 8
Without changing ISO you can get reduce motion blur in photos by using a larger aperture (otherwise known as "F-stop"). Focus will need to be more accurate, however, because you also reduce depth of field.
post #6 of 8
[quote]Originally posted by tonton:
<strong>Without changing ISO you can get reduce motion blur in photos by using a larger aperture (otherwise known as "F-stop"). Focus will need to be more accurate, however, because you also reduce depth of field.</strong><hr></blockquote>

You can also try to get people moving more s l o w l y .

What a "larger" f-stop gets you is actually faster shutter speed, which will reduce blur. A larger f-stop in itself does not decrease "blur." What your really want is faster shutter speed.

More light -&gt; faster shutter speed -&gt; less blur.

More sensitive ISO -&gt; more light
Larger aperature (smaller f-stop number) -&gt; more light
Flash -&gt; more light
...

You get the idea.
Die Grüne Hölle - Gute Fahrt
Reply
Die Grüne Hölle - Gute Fahrt
Reply
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by GardenOfEarthlyDelights:
<strong>

What he said.

This is exactly the same concept as film speed. You use ISO 200 for outdoor shots, 400 for inside and fast action shots, and 1000 for really dark, or really fast action. Of course, you pay for this sensitivity by having more film grain in your shots.

But let's really get to the point. You need to get rid of that piece of junk and get a manly camera: the <a href="http://www.bizrate.com/marketplace/search/search__cat_id--11510000,keyword--canon%20eos%201ds,de_id--200.html" target="_blank">Canon EOS 1Ds.</a></strong><hr></blockquote>

I'm about $8k short.... Maybe when I win the lottery!
20" iMac G5, 2 GB Ram, OS X 10.4.11, .Mac
Reply
20" iMac G5, 2 GB Ram, OS X 10.4.11, .Mac
Reply
post #8 of 8
[quote]Originally posted by gobble gobble:
<strong>

I'm about $8k short.... Maybe when I win the lottery!</strong><hr></blockquote>

ummm... can I borrow it when you get one?

If my wife's not looking, I may “settle” for the Canon EOS D60.
Die Grüne Hölle - Gute Fahrt
Reply
Die Grüne Hölle - Gute Fahrt
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › Canon Digital Camera ISO question