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Apple's 8GB iPhone 5c offers just 3.7GB less storage than Samsung's "16GB" flagship Galaxy S4 - Page 5

post #161 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTDIntelligence View Post

With KitKat apps can only access directories created by themselves so an SD card really is a problem with Android devices. So both the Galaxy S5 and HTC One M8 will probably be marketed internationally as 16 gig devices but with SD card slots. Shame they won't mention the new 4.4 restrictions!

Still 32 gig should be the min for a device nowadays. The 8 gig 5C is a bizarre launch in my opinion esp when the 16 gig 5C is only 40 quid more!

But hey spin any launch as positive eh Daniel. Please explain the hate when Apple has no competitors and we all buy Apple gear?

audible on a galaxy s4 running 4.4 can write to an sd card. you can even set the preference to save data to an external sd card. Other apps can be sent to an sd card and still work

post #162 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by singularity View Post

audible on a galaxy s4 running 4.4 can write to an sd card. you can even set the preference to save data to an external sd card. Other apps can be sent to an sd card and still work

What sort of encryption is used on the SD card so that the data can't be accessed by another by placing that SD card into another device?

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post #163 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by singularity View Post

audible on a galaxy s4 running 4.4 can write to an sd card. you can even set the preference to save data to an external sd card. Other apps can be sent to an sd card and still work

What sort of encryption is used on the SD card so that the data can't be accessed by another by placing that SD card into another device?
Once you encrypt the sd card it will only work on the phone you encrypted it on afaik. As for its level its fips140-2 certified.
post #164 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


What sort of encryption is used on the SD card so that the data can't be accessed by another by placing that SD card into another device?

When one turns on device encryption, the SD card is encrypted just like any attached storage device using dm-crypt, which is the standard disk encryption subsystem in linux.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 3/23/14 at 6:25am
post #165 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

When one turns on device encryption, the SD card is encrypted just like any attached storage device using dm-crypt, which is the standard disk encryption subsystem in linux.

So each new account user has to remove their SD card and the next user has to put a new one in and setup encryption the first time so they can store private info?

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post #166 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


So each new account user has to remove their SD card and the next user has to put a new one in and setup encryption the first time so they can store private info?

For the purposes of encryption, SD cards are treated like any other attached storage. It is irrelevant whether the storage medium is physically removable (and on desktops which have long supported both multiuser and disk encryption, all physical storage is technically removable). So once the root volume is unlocked at boot time by the primary owner, all other users should be able to work with the device as usual. This is similar to how once a Mac with Filevault has booted up, the other users on the machine don't have to know the Filevault password in order to log in and out of their accounts, and the process of adding unix user accounts is decoupled from Filevault.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 3/23/14 at 8:39am
post #167 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

For the purposes of encryption, SD cards are treated like any other attached storage. It is irrelevant whether the storage medium is physically removable (and on desktops which have long supported both multiuser and disk encryption, all physical storage is technically removable). So once the root volume is unlocked at boot time by the primary owner, all other users should be able to work with the device as usual. This is similar to how once a Mac with Filevault has booted up, the other users on the machine don't have to know the Filevault password in order to log in and out of their accounts, and the process of adding unix user accounts is decoupled from Filevault.

That makes sense. Thanks.

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AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple's 8GB iPhone 5c offers just 3.7GB less storage than Samsung's "16GB" flagship Galaxy S4