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Apple's Safari most-used smartphone browser, but apps dominate mobile Web

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
Smartphone owners are nearly seven times as likely to choose native apps over mobile Web apps, new data shows. But when mobile users do turn to the Web, a majority use Apple's Safari browser.




Of the 2 hours and 42 minutes that consumers in the U.S. spend on their smartphones every day, 86 percent -- all but 23 minutes - is spent in third-party apps, according to mobile analytics and advertising firm Flurry. Nearly one-third, or 32 percent, of that time can be chalked up to gaming, with social media and messaging following closely behind at 28 percent.

"The data tells a clear story that apps, which were considered a mere fad a few years ago, are completely dominating mobile, and the browser has become a single application swimming in a sea of apps," the company said.

Users spend just 14 percent of their time using web browsers, with Apple's Safari responsible for 50 percent of that total. Another 35 percent went to Google, with the rest booked by "others." There was no word on how much of that time was spent using web-based applications versus general web surfing, however.

Safari's win came despite the inclusion of both Android and iOS devices in the study, though it is not the first time that mobile web engagement has been shown to be significantly higher on iOS devices. Apple's iPhone and iPad accounted for 80 percent of mobile sales during last year's Black Friday period, for instance.

Facebook and YouTube were the most-used third-party apps at 17 percent and 4 percent, respectively.
post #2 of 37
Since Apple doesn't make a browser for Android and Android-based devices supposedly outsell iOS-based devices by wide margin one must interpret these results as most Android-based devices are not being used as "smart" devices. I have a hard time believing that Android users change their User Agent to represent an iDevice.

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post #3 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Since Apple doesn't make a browser for Android and Android-based devices supposedly outsell iOS-based devices by wide margin one must interpret these results as most Android-based devices are not being used as "smart" devices. I have a hard time believing that Android users change their User Agent to represent an iDevice.

Soli, if using Chrome (or other browsers) on an iPhone does it report itself as being Safari? I can't really tell and don't know enough about it to figure it out.
This is the supposed user-string for Chrome on an iPhone

Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 5_1_1 like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/534.46.0 (KHTML, like Gecko) CriOS/19.0.1084.60 Mobile/9B206 Safari/7534.48.3

https://developers.google.com/chrome/mobile/docs/user-agent
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post #4 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Soli, if using Chrome (or other browsers) on an iPhone does it report itself as being Safari? I can't really tell and don't know enough about it to figure it out.
https://developers.google.com/chrome/mobile/docs/user-agent

I don't know but it's easy to figure out by hitting any one of the many webpages designed to display your User Agent and other brewer data.

But that's beside the point. Even if using Chrome on an iDevice it's still an iDevice. If Android has all these activations why are real world usage constantly lower than the iOS?

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #5 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Soli, if using Chrome (or other browsers) on an iPhone does it report itself as being Safari? I can't really tell and don't know enough about it to figure it out.
This is the supposed user-string for Chrome on an iPhone

Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 5_1_1 like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/534.46.0 (KHTML, like Gecko) CriOS/19.0.1084.60 Mobile/9B206 Safari/7534.48.3

https://developers.google.com/chrome/mobile/docs/user-agent

So where does Google's 35% come from?
post #6 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I don't know but it's easy to figure out by hitting any one of the many webpages designed to display your User Agent and other brewer data.

But that's beside the point. Even if using Chrome on an iDevice it's still an iDevice. If Android has all these activations why are real world usage constantly lower than the iOS?

IIRC the stats vary depending on who reports them, tho I haven't bothered looking at it myself in some time. I thought some analytics firms showed Android browser share higher than iOS except on tablets where Apple was much higher. I can take a look later, but I really don't know. I agree it would be silly to chalk it up to Android users intentionally changing their user string. That's sounds ridiculous.
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post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

IIRC the stats vary depending on who reports them, tho I haven't bothered looking at it myself in some time. I thought some analytics firms showed Android browser share higher than iOS except on tablets where Apple was much higher. I can take a look later, but I really don't know. I agree it would be silly to chalk it up to Android users intentionally changing their user string. That's sounds ridiculous.

I haven't seen a single report of Android v iOS-based device usage that even came close to having Android represented by the vast number of "activations" that have been claimed by Google in comparison to Apple's iDevice sales.


PS: I see you edited your previous comment after I started posting. Note the CriOS/19.0.1084.60 specifically references Chrome on iOS and other parts of the UA clearly tell you it's not using Apple's Safari even though Chrome is having to use Apple's built-in WebKit. That still wouldn't show up as Safari, but even if it did it still doesn't account for the billions of activations for devices that don't appear to be used online.
Code:
Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 7_0 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/537.51.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/7.0 Mobile/11A465 Safari/9537.53

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post #8 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

So where does Google's 35% come from?
So there's at least two of us with questions about it.
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post #9 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I haven't seen a single report of Android v iOS-based device usage that even came close to having Android represented by the vast number of "activations" that have been claimed by Google in comparison to Apple's iDevice sales.]

You could look at StatCounter for a comparison. (Disclaimer: I just did) They let you break it down by device type too, such as looking at only tablet browser share
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post #10 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

You could look at StatCounter for a comparison. (Disclaimer: I just did) They let you break it down by device type too, such as looking at only tablet browser share

Perhaps I'm not making my point clear. The last report I read from Google is that they had 1.5 million activations per day… not just a single lucky day. Based on Apple's sales for their Holiday quarter they are only selling an average of 0.5 million device each day. So where are the stats that show Android-based devices at a level 3x higher than iOS-based devices? If they don't exist then either these 'activations" are not viable data for determining "smart" devices or we need to stop referring to each-and-every device running Android a "smart" device simply because it's running Android.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Perhaps I'm not making my point clear. The last report I read from Google is that they had 1.5 million activations per day… not just a single lucky day. Based on Apple's sales for their Holiday quarter they are only selling an average of 0.5 million device each day. So where are the stats that show Android-based devices at a level 3x higher than iOS-based devices? If they don't exist then either these 'activations" are not viable data for determining "smart" devices or we need to stop referring to each-and-every device running Android a "smart" device simply because it's running Android.

 

Most Android phones being sold are actually dirt cheap feature phones, but of course everyone counts these in their "marketshare" analysis vs iPhones in order to make Apple look bad. It's a ridiculous comparisons, and usage #s just prove just how small of a percentage of these phones are being used for anything approaching "smart" capability. But hey, 82,024,017,322 are being activated per day (or whatever the figure is) so it's all good and Apple is doomed. 

post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Perhaps I'm not making my point clear. The last report I read from Google is that they had 1.5 million activations per day… not just a single lucky day. Based on Apple's sales for their Holiday quarter they are only selling an average of 0.5 million device each day. So where are the stats that show Android-based devices at a level 3x higher than iOS-based devices? If they don't exist then either these 'activations" are not viable data for determining "smart" devices or we need to stop referring to each-and-every device running Android a "smart" device simply because it's running Android.

OH, I agree that there's a whole lotta smartphone users that don't use them as smartphones. We don't at all disagree on that.
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post #13 of 37
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Soli, if using Chrome (or other browsers) on an iPhone does it report itself as being Safari? I can't really tell and don't know enough about it to figure it out.
This is the supposed user-string for Chrome on an iPhone

Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 5_1_1 like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/534.46.0 (KHTML, like Gecko) CriOS/19.0.1084.60 Mobile/9B206 Safari/7534.48.3

 

Ah, a twist on the old “Android users are changing their browser strings to look like iOS that’s why you don’t see Android in web use stats ha ha ha we still win” classic.

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post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

If they don't exist then either these 'activations" are not viable data for determining "smart" devices or we need to stop referring to each-and-every device running Android a "smart" device simply because it's running Android.

 

An excellent point.  It seems to me that the "billions and billions" (Carl Sagan voice) of Android tablets (and cellular-enabled) devices being sold are merely children's gaming toys. They run candy crusher and anger birds and that's about it, by the user's choice.  Most are apparently so underpowered that they can't render a media-heavy web page (like nytimes.com or aol.com) anyway. So I'd agree... time to stop calling these "smart-phones" or "iPad competitors".   I've got a Kindle, and I use it solely to read books.  It's NOT a smart-device, in my hands.

post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post
 

 

An excellent point.  It seems to me that the "billions and billions" (Carl Sagan voice) of Android tablets (and cellular-enabled) devices being sold are merely children's gaming toys. They run candy crusher and anger birds and that's about it, by the user's choice.  Most are apparently so underpowered that they can't render a media-heavy web page (like nytimes.com or aol.com) anyway. So I'd agree... time to stop calling these "smart-phones" or "iPad competitors".   I've got a Kindle, and I use it solely to read books.  It's NOT a smart-device, in my hands.

 

I'd argue the majority of Apple (or Android) "smart-phone" users don't do anything more with their phone than text, go on Facebook and play Candy crush and other games.

post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistercow View Post

I'd argue the majority of Apple (or Android) "smart-phone" users don't do anything more with their phone than text, go on Facebook and play Candy crush and other games.

That seems to be the case, and there is nothing wrong with that. Android fills the "feature" phone market segment much better than Symbian. I just wish these details weren't be hidden.

I'd be fine if there wasn't hypocrisy. The iPad still isn't being seen as a "PC" in stats even though we see a direct drop in "PC" sales and a rise in iPad sales, and evidence that many are using their iPads for tasks they only ever did with their "PC."

I'm not saying the iPad should be classified as part of those desktop and notebook "PCs" but they definitely more useful than netbooks and there was no problem categorizing pre-iPad tablets "PCs" when they ran Windows. It all just seems unfair to me.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #17 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Perhaps I'm not making my point clear. The last report I read from Google is that they had 1.5 million activations per day… not just a single lucky day. Based on Apple's sales for their Holiday quarter they are only selling an average of 0.5 million device each day. So where are the stats that show Android-based devices at a level 3x higher than iOS-based devices? If they don't exist then either these 'activations" are not viable data for determining "smart" devices or we need to stop referring to each-and-every device running Android a "smart" device simply because it's running Android.

Soli, they're still smart devices whether the owner makes frequent use of their connected features or not. A sale of a pickup truck is still a truck sale whether the owner ever puts a thing in the bed of it. Why does it matter what the phone is used for? Now if you're a company looking to monetize smart device owners then of course it would matter to them. To Verizon or ATT or Best Buy or Motorola or LG, etc, etc. I doubt they particularly care nor see why it would affect their revenue much if at all if customers don't use a web browser after they bought the phone and signed a contract.
Edited by Gatorguy - 4/1/14 at 9:14am
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post #18 of 37
There's one very important issue people are missing.

People spend their time in Apps. Once they unlock their phone it's straight to an App to play games, check mail, text or whatever else they're doing.

Yet Apple haters/Android users constantly criticize iOS as being nothing but a "glorified App launcher" with no ability to customize their home screen. Why do I need to customize my home screen? I don't get any work done there anyway. My first page on my iPhone has the Apps I use the most, so as soon as I unlock I can select one right away. Any other tidbits I might need that don't require opening an App are handled with notifications.

Well it seems that ALL smartphones are being used as App launchers since that's where people spend their time - in Apps.

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post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Soli, they're still smart devices whether the owner makes frequent use of their connected features or not. A sale of a pickup truck is still a truck sale whether the owner ever puts a thing in the bed of it. Why does it matter what the phone is used for? Now if you're a company looking to monetize smart device owners then of course it would matter to them. To Verizon or ATT or Best Buy or Motorola or LG, etc, etc. I doubt they particularly care nor see why it would affect their revenue much if at all if customers don't use a web browser after they bought the phone and signed a contract.

Exactly. Devs shouldn't use shipment market share to figure out which OS to develop for first. However that's all we hear about from analysts.
post #20 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Soli, they're still smart devices whether the owner makes frequent use of their connected features or not. A sale of a pickup truck is still a truck sale whether the owner ever puts a thing in the bed of it. Why does it matter what the phone is used for? Now if you're a company looking to monetize smart device owners then of course it would matter to them. To Verizon or ATT or Best Buy or Motorola or LG, etc, etc. I doubt they particularly care nor see why it would affect their revenue much if at all if customers don't use a web browser after they bought the phone and signed a contract.

I would argue they aren't pickup trucks but rather putting a single part of a pickup truck on a much weaker and less capable device then classifying itself as a truck.

We need to stop putting "truck nuts" on go-carts.

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post #21 of 37
^ LOL. I have a bumper sticker on my truck targeting Honda Civics with fart can exhausts. It reads:

"My lug nuts require more torque to tighten then what your engine produces."

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post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Ah, a twist on the old “Android users are changing their browser strings to look like iOS that’s why you don’t see Android in web use stats ha ha ha we still win” classic.

 

Yep, the Android crowd always has an explanation. By the way, what’s the explanation for Office being released for iPad first? Gatorguy, can you fill us in? You’re the resident Android apologist.

post #23 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

There's one very important issue people are missing.

People spend their time in Apps. Once they unlock their phone it's straight to an App to play games, check mail, text or whatever else they're doing.

Yet Apple haters/Android users constantly criticize iOS as being nothing but a "glorified App launcher" with no ability to customize their home screen. Why do I need to customize my home screen? I don't get any work done there anyway. My first page on my iPhone has the Apps I use the most, so as soon as I unlock I can select one right away. Any other tidbits I might need that don't require opening an App are handled with notifications.

Well it seems that ALL smartphones are being used as App launchers since that's where people spend their time - in Apps.

 

I believe the point is that if you had widgets that could display more information than a simple icon, you wouldn't need to spend as much time in apps, i.e.  I can glance at information from multiple apps and then see which ones I actually need to go into.  

post #24 of 37

It should be pointed out that the Flurry report focused on U.S. smartphones.

 

Android activations are indeed much higher, but a huge portion of that comes from low-end devices in emerging markets (China, India, Brazil, Indonesia, etc.). The 1.5 million Android activations per day is a worldwide number.

 

One cannot extrapolate worldwide cellphone usage patterns by looking at usage in the wealthiest countries (U.S., UK, Japan, Germany, etc.).

post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

By the way, what’s the explanation for Office being released for iPad first? Gatorguy, can you fill us in? You’re the resident Android apologist.

I offered my guess in the very first post in that thread. Surprised you missed it.
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post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

It should be pointed out that the Flurry report focused on U.S. smartphones.

 

Android activations are indeed much higher, but a huge portion of that comes from low-end devices in emerging markets (China, India, Brazil, Indonesia, etc.). The 1.5 million Android activations per day is a worldwide number.

 

One cannot extrapolate worldwide cellphone usage patterns by looking at usage in the wealthiest countries (U.S., UK, Japan, Germany, etc.).

Here's probably a fairly realistic view of what is happening.

 

http://cdn0.tnwcdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2014/03/iOS-v-Android-global-split.jpg

post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I don't know but it's easy to figure out by hitting any one of the many webpages designed to display your User Agent and other brewer data.

But that's beside the point. Even if using Chrome on an iDevice it's still an iDevice. If Android has all these activations why are real world usage constantly lower than the iOS?

Here's what mine reads from the stock browser (not Chrome) on my GNex, and no alterations to the user agent.

Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.2.2; en-us; Galaxy Nexus Build/JDQ39) AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/534.30
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post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Here's what mine reads from the stock browser (not Chrome) on my GNex, and no alterations to the user agent.

Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.2.2; en-us; Galaxy Nexus Build/JDQ39) AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/534.30

Thank you for proving what I've said countless times. Aside from it reporting Safari/WebKit, what else do I see? The version of Android you're running and the device type. So much for the idiots claiming user agents confuse analytics software. I could care less what browser you've got - I know you're using Android and which version. This allows me to determine how many iOS users vs Android users visit my site (for example).

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post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Thank you for proving what I've said countless times. Aside from it reporting Safari/WebKit, what else do I see? The version of Android you're running and the device type. So much for the idiots claiming user agents confuse analytics software. I could care less what browser you've got - I know you're using Android and which version. This allows me to determine how many iOS users vs Android users visit my site (for example).

If he noting his UA to show that Apple and Safari are stated in it as proof it's confusing for analytics SW I didn't get that. If that's that case it's surely not correct as noted by the clear mention of the platform and even HW within the first set of parenthesis.

For the sake of clarity I'll break his UA down…

Code:
Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.2.2; en-us; Galaxy Nexus Build/JDQ39) AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/534.30

The components of this string are as follows:
  • Mozilla/5.0 — Previously used to indicate compatibility with the Mozilla rendering engine
  • (Linux; U; Android 4.2.2; en-us; Galaxy Nexus Build/JDQ39) — Details of the system in which the browser is running
  • AppleWebKit/534.30 — The platform the browser uses. Don't forget that WebKit is Apple's creation based off of KHTML. Eventually (if not already) Chrome's forking of WebKit will lead to its own platform being mentioned here with a version number.
  • (KHTML, like Gecko) — Browser platform details
  • Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/534.30 — This is used by the browser to indicate specific enhancements that are available directly in the browser or through third parties. An example of this is Microsoft Live Meeting which registers an extension so that the Live Meeting service knows if the software is already installed, which means it can provide a streamlined experience to joining meetings. Because the version number is the same as the AppleWebKit version number I'm not sure if this means this default Nexus brewer will allow it to use all WebKit-speciifc rules not yet part of the Consortium or if that is just a placeholder value.

Anyone please feel free to clarify this data even more or correct any issues.

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post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

If he noting his UA to show that Apple and Safari are stated in it as proof it's confusing for analytics SW I didn't get that. If that's that case it's surely not correct as noted by the clear mention of the platform and even HW within the first set of parenthesis.

For the sake of clarity I'll break his UA down…

Code:
Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.2.2; en-us; Galaxy Nexus Build/JDQ39) AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/534.30

The components of this string are as follows:
  • Mozilla/5.0 — Previously used to indicate compatibility with the Mozilla rendering engine
  • (Linux; U; Android 4.2.2; en-us; Galaxy Nexus Build/JDQ39) — Details of the system in which the browser is running
  • AppleWebKit/534.30 — The platform the browser uses. Don't forget that WebKit is Apple's creation based off of KHTML. Eventually (if not already) Chrome's forking of WebKit will lead to its own platform being mentioned here with a version number.
  • (KHTML, like Gecko) — Browser platform details
  • Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/534.30 — This is used by the browser to indicate specific enhancements that are available directly in the browser or through third parties. An example of this is Microsoft Live Meeting which registers an extension so that the Live Meeting service knows if the software is already installed, which means it can provide a streamlined experience to joining meetings. Because the version number is the same as the AppleWebKit version number I'm not sure if this means this default Nexus brewer will allow it to use all WebKit-speciifc rules not yet part of the Consortium or if that is just a placeholder value.

Anyone please feel free to clarify this data even more or correct any issues.

No I didn't post it with a ulterior 'ah ha, see it says Apple and Safari' motive. I was curious to see what it would contain, and thought I'd share it with anyone that would want to know how it comes up in Android.

And here's your answer to how it shows up on Chrome.

Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; Android 4.2.2; Galaxy Nexus Build/JDQ39) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/33.0.1750.132 Mobile Safari/537.36
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post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

There's one very important issue people are missing.


People spend their time in Apps. Once they unlock their phone it's straight to an App to play games, check mail, text or whatever else they're doing.


Yet Apple haters/Android users constantly criticize iOS as being nothing but a "glorified App launcher" with no ability to customize their home screen. Why do I need to customize my home screen? I don't get any work done there anyway. My first page on my iPhone has the Apps I use the most, so as soon as I unlock I can select one right away. Any other tidbits I might need that don't require opening an App are handled with notifications.


Well it seems that ALL smartphones are being used as App launchers since that's where people spend their time - in Apps.
There's another aspect to the "glorified App launcher" criticism besides homescreen aesthetics (and I agree that the average user doesn't spend much time staring at the homescreen). It's that as a result of how iOS is designed, apps on iOS tend to exist in isolation with limited means for communicating with one another. This limitation promotes duplication of functionality can cause third-party apps to feel bolted on. For example, if an app A wants to share a photo to app B or open a map link in app B, the developer of app A has to explicitly hardcode the url scheme for app B at compile time. If a user of app A prefers to instead use app C, then he would need to jump through copy-paste hoops.

Android adheres more closely to the unix philosophy of computing, which envisions small, specialized programs working together in order to accomplish complex tasks. The facilities for inter-app communication are much stronger and intentionally blur the boundaries between apps. An Android app is made up of functional units called "activities", and each activity can be advertised as a publicly callable service that other apps can make their own. Another major difference from iOS is that on an Android system, the external services that an app can use are determined at runtime by the user rather than fixed at compile time. So if you select a map link in any browser and have Waze installed, you would see something like the following:


(http://media02.hongkiat.com/push-content-android-pushbullet/complete-action-using.jpg)
This mechanism lets third-party apps can integrate with the system just as well as first-party apps. Android also serves as an "app launcher", but the apps behave more like components of an interconnected system rather than isolated parts.
Edited by d4NjvRzf - 4/2/14 at 5:19am
post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Thank you for proving what I've said countless times. Aside from it reporting Safari/WebKit, what else do I see? The version of Android you're running and the device type. So much for the idiots claiming user agents confuse analytics software. I could care less what browser you've got - I know you're using Android and which version. This allows me to determine how many iOS users vs Android users visit my site (for example).

I never bought into that line of reasoning. The number of people that change their user agent for whatever reason aren't going to be enough to sway usage stats not one iota.
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
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post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


I never bought into that line of reasoning. The number of people that change their user agent for whatever reason aren't going to be enough to sway usage stats not one iota.

 

I'm not saying you bought into that line of thinking.

 

Just pointing out that there are a LOT of people who assume that because Safari/Webkit shows up in the user agent that somehow Android devices are getting counted as iOS devices. And this isn't just the odd person here or there - every single time an analytics company (Flurry, SA, Chitika, IBM...) does a study regarding iOS vs Android usage there are always several people who immediately bring up the user agent to show the numbers can't be accurate.

 

And if you bring up the idea that most people don't mess with their user agent they'll call BS as "every Android user is intelligent and always modifies their devices for maximum performance and usability".

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post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

I'm not saying you bought into that line of thinking.

Just pointing out that there are a LOT of people who assume that because Safari/Webkit shows up in the user agent that somehow Android devices are getting counted as iOS devices. And this isn't just the odd person here or there - every single time an analytics company (Flurry, SA, Chitika, IBM...) does a study regarding iOS vs Android usage there are always several people who immediately bring up the user agent to show the numbers can't be accurate.

And if you bring up the idea that most people don't mess with their user agent they'll call BS as "every Android user is intelligent and always modifies their devices for maximum performance and usability".

Apologies if I sounded accusatory, I meant it as a matter of factly. I absolutely agree that most people don't change their UA. It used to be easy to do in earlier versions of Android, but that's no longer the case.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #35 of 37

I can't believe one person actually equated phone web browser usage with using a smartphone as a "smart" device. It is simply one of literally millions of choices available to a smartphone user regardless of platform. All this research simply says is that is you want to read news it may be easier to use a dedicated news app than open safari and the same applies with thousands of other apps that get the info to you faster and better than Safari. Why would this surprise anyone since this trend has been obvious for years. 

 

Some people might spend the majority of their time playing games, students might use it mainly for Yik Yak, tumblr, kik, twitter, and Facebook. Others might use it primarily as a hook up app. Others still might use it primarily for diagnostic apps whether medical, engineering, or so many other possibilities. Are those people somehow not using their smartphone as a smartphone because their usage pattern does not include browsing the web a a certain percentage of the time.  Give me a break. The myopic opinions here  is staggering. Please let me know the correct percentage of time I should be using Safari on my iPhone so I meet with your approval. :no: 

 

Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

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Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

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post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I don't know but it's easy to figure out by hitting any one of the many webpages designed to display your User Agent and other brewer data.

But that's beside the point. Even if using Chrome on an iDevice it's still an iDevice. If Android has all these activations why are real world usage constantly lower than the iOS?

Just out of curiosity I found out how to change my UA, it's not as simple as it used to be, but not all that difficult. Here's what I got now on the stock Android browser.

Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_0 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/532.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0.5 Mobile/8A293 Safari/6531.22.7
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #37 of 37
User-agent wars. lol.gif

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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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