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Adobe overhauls Premiere Pro, After Effects with tighter integration for video pros

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Graphics software giant Adobe on Wednesday spoke at the annual NAB show in Las Vegas to reveal new versions of the video editing apps in its Creative Cloud suite, including significant upgrades for Premiere Pro and After Effects, making them part of a more cohesive, tightly integrated suite of products.

cc


Premiere Pro CC is set to gain a slew of new features and tweaks, including the ability to edit After Effects compositions without switching applications, a change designed to speed up editing. Editors will also be able to take advantage of a new dynamic masking and tracking function to make blurring faces and logos easier.

In addition, the new version will leverage Creative Cloud more heavily, providing facilities for automated backups and real-time synchronization between applications and teams using Adobe Anywhere.

After Effects CC's keying features will also be enhanced to provide better keying results when video has been compressed, and Adobe has integrated its Typekit typography-as-a-service offering. This will allow After Effects users to choose any Typekit-enabled typeface for use on the desktop.

"Broadcasters, filmmakers, corporate publishers and video professionals today are expected to relentlessly keep up with new formats, frame rates and distribution methods," said Adobe product executive Steve Warner. "Customers who have switched to Adobe Creative Cloud from alternative offerings tell us that Adobe apps and solutions give them a significant advantage. And with hundreds of new features and enhancements added with regular releases over the past 12 months, we continue to raise the bar with faster workflows for video pros."

Several supporting apps will also receive updates, including Story CC, Audition CC, Prelude CC, and SpeedGrade. Most of the changes revolve around enabling faster editing workflows, though SpeedGrade -- software that helps editors with color correction -- will also add support for OpenCL on the Mac Pro.

Adobe has been focusing extra attention on its video editing suite in recent years in an attempt to win back customers who had previously switched to Apple's Final Cut Studio. Many of those same customers were angered by the changes Apple made to Final Cut Pro X, and the two companies have been battling for hearts and minds in the years since its release.

Premiere Pro and After Effects are available part of Adobe's Creative Cloud, a subscription product that gives access to Adobe's entire software lineup for $49.99 per month. Discounts are available for educators and students, who start at $19.99 per month, while those upgrading from older "boxed" versions of Creative Suite can pay just $29.99 per month for the first year.

Users signing up now will be able to upgrade for free when the new versions of Premiere and After Effects ship "in the next couple of months."
post #2 of 29
Still hate their rent-an-app offerings. Let me know when you go back to selling the software, Adobe.

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post #3 of 29
Typo in headline and a few other places: it's Premier***e*** Pro...
post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Still hate their rent-an-app offerings. Let me know when you go back to selling the software, Adobe.

Agreed! Not a big fan of Adobe. And really abhor subscription services. I don't like companies dipping into my checking acct. every month! Thanks, but no thanks.

Best.
post #5 of 29
While I am not a fan of the subscription I do like that we don't have to wait 8 to 12 months to get upgrades. The criticisms of the subscription service may be pushing Adobe to innovate and the list of improvements, integration and new features that Steve Forde has broken out in his blog are exciting.
post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulk001 View Post

While I am not a fan of the subscription I do like that we don't have to wait 8 to 12 months to get upgrades. The criticisms of the subscription service may be pushing Adobe to innovate and the list of improvements, integration and new features that Steve Forde has broken out in his blog are exciting.

 

Exactly.  Without the need to sell users on a new version of the software every year, Adobe can push out more frequent updates, rather than stockpiling them for one big update.

 

I only use a limited number of their apps, so I wish they had some more flexible subscription options, but overall I think it was a move they needed to make.

post #7 of 29
Seriously, fk Adobe! They are arrogant to the Nth degree and make ridiculously bloated and complicated user interfaces, and refuse to adhere to Apples interface standards. They have no concept of ease-of-use and are stealing from their users with the subscription only model.
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Still hate their rent-an-app offerings. Let me know when you go back to selling the software, Adobe.

I can understand why this business model might be annoying for some people. Adobe CC just quit being tailored to pros and amateurs. The software is now strictly for professionals. Unfortunately it doesn't work out for people who want to buy a smaller suite and keep it for several years, but it does offer new entrepreneurs the ability to scale up and down according to their project needs without a heavy cash outlay or purchased licenses lying around unused when there is less work. It is professional software. 

 

The monthly payment model is becoming quite commonplace for expense professional software.

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post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

Seriously, fk Adobe! They are arrogant to the Nth degree and make ridiculously bloated and complicated user interfaces, and refuse to adhere to Apples interface standards. They have no concept of ease-of-use and are stealing from their users with the subscription only model.

 

Its an easy thing to say, but if you work in video production, publishing, web design, etc.... Adobe's products (for good or ill) hold the same preeminent position as Microsofts Office Suite.

 

I think them moving to the subscription model will ultimately open up a window for some competitor to scoop up users who can't or won't move onto Creative Cloud.  Guys like Acorn or Pixelmator should be moving as fast as they can right now to build out their applications as viable lower to mid-tier alternatives to Photoshop.

post #10 of 29
I don't see how a subscription model enables these guys to update the software more frequently, we get updated software with Apple's apps almost every month and for buying it once and getting lifetime of updates.

Yes sure Apple is a hardware company designing software for its' hardware and hence they can get away with such a software update model.
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thIndian View Post
 
Exactly.  Without the need to sell users on a new version of the software every year, Adobe can push out more frequent updates, rather than stockpiling them for one big update.

 

I only use a limited number of their apps, so I wish they had some more flexible subscription options, but overall I think it was a move they needed to make.

This update is a perfect example of why it is better. They are only updating the video apps. With the old model they would release a new suite with only a few bug fixes to some apps and major new features to others but they were all bundled together. Now the apps can be updated when necessary or as soon as they are ready.

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post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by superjunaid View Post

I don't see how a subscription model enables these guys to update the software more frequently, we get updated software with Apple's apps almost every month and for buying it once and getting lifetime of updates.

Yes sure Apple is a hardware company designing software for its' hardware and hence they can get away with such a software update model.

 

You said it exactly.  You are subscribing to Apple, just via their hardware.  Apple can afford to work this way.  Adobe as a purely software company cannot.

 

Without needing to sell it's user base on big, annual upgrades, Adobe has no motivation to hold back features.  So updates will come more frequently.

 

Apple similarly releases updates when they're ready.  If you've already bought FinalCutProX, then don't expect to pay again until the next major revision- which could be years down the road.  But the cost of this for Apple is amortized in hardware sales.

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

This update is a perfect example of why it is better. They are only updating the video apps. With the old model they would release a new suite with only a few bug fixes to some apps and major new features to others but they were all bundled together. Now the apps can be updated when necessary or as soon as they are ready.

 

And what's to stop them from NOT adding new features (or slowing updates to a crawl) in the future?

 

You'd still have to pay them every month, despite the lack of any updates, or you wont be able to edit your files.

 

And, no, using an older CS6 boxed version THEN wont be a solution -- because:

 

a) it wont recognise all the features created in CC versions, so project made in them won't open or open with missing stuff.

b) it wont have support for the latest graphics cards, peripherals, cpu extensions, etc.

c) it wont be sold forever.

d) a future OS update might render it crippled or unrunnable (e.g forget about running it in some future possible ARM-based Mac laptop).

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by foljs View Post
 

And what's to stop them from NOT adding new features (or slowing updates to a crawl) in the future?

 

You'd still have to pay them every month, despite the lack of any updates, or you wont be able to edit your files.

 

And, no, using an older CS6 boxed version THEN wont be a solution -- because:

 

a) it wont recognise all the features created in CC versions, so project made in them won't open or open with missing stuff.

b) it wont have support for the latest graphics cards, peripherals, cpu extensions, etc.

c) it wont be sold forever.

d) a future OS update might render it crippled or unrunnable (e.g forget about running it in some future possible ARM-based Mac laptop).

That's the power of positive thinking!

 

Seriously, if you decide you no longer want the monthly payments, you can end the subscription. Before doing so, you should export all of your inDesign documents to the IDML format so they can be opened in previous versions. Photoshop, historically, can open psd files in an older version. If your psd file contains features that are not supported by the older version, the file still opens but those features cannot be edited. Tiff files can also be saved in layers, so that would be another option. Illustrator files can be saved to any of several earlier versions for compatibility, although the unsupported features will not be saved, but the files will open in the previous version.

 

Or you can end your subscription temporarily while you do not need it, and resubscribe later month to month if that better suits your needs.

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post #15 of 29

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

That's the power of positive thinking!

 

 

No, that's the power of pragmatic thinking, from someone who has experience with companies getting complacent and screwing their customers over (remember Quark? 00's Microsoft? 00's Adobe post Macromedia acquisition?).

 

Quote:

Seriously, if you decide you no longer want the monthly payments, you can end the subscription. Before doing so, you should export all of your inDesign documents to the IDML format so they can be opened in previous versions. Photoshop, historically, can open psd files in an older version. If your psd file contains features that are not supported by the older version, the file still opens but those features cannot be edited. Tiff files can also be saved in layers, so that would be another option. Illustrator files can be saved to any of several earlier versions for compatibility, although the unsupported features will not be saved, but the files will open in the previous version.

 

 

Yeah, I know all that. They don't really answer my concerns though. It just means that there's a way to get the barebones documents back, with the features available in CS6. And that wont really work with more involved and faster moving technologies, like video editing. I might not be able to edit 4K video at all in CS6 for example.

 

In essense you say: 

 

"if Adobe starts to slack off in the future you could still export bare-bone versions of your files, to a great cost to your workflow, and also go look for alternative apps".

 

Hardly an assurance on investing in the CC (and using the new futures they introduce now. That there's a way to escape losing some limbs, doesn't mean Adobe doesn't have you captured.

 

Or you can end your subscription temporarily while you do not need it, and resubscribe later month to month if that better suits your needs.

 

The thing is, I might not like, say, the lack of updates in 2016, but I would still like to be able to open and edit MY files. So, "ending my subscription" won't be an option -- and some old, boxed version, essentially a regression, is hardly a solution.

 

At least if they had their usual 18-month new versions, I could still with one I like, and skip 1-2 or even 5 versions, until either they have something compelling, or I'm forced to because the old one doesn't run on my system anymore. 

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by foljs View Post
 

"if Adobe starts to slack off in the future you could still export bare-bone versions of your files, to a great cost to your workflow, and also go look for alternative apps".

Fundamentally we disagree on the simple premise that a professional organization can afford to stay stagnant over the course of multiple software updates. If anything, the update cycle is accelerating faster than ever. Even professionals are struggling to keep pace with new innovations. If you want to dwell on your old expired edition of CS then I don't think you get the concept of,  move forward or die, in the graphics industry. You can't go back to your canvas, paints an brushes. If you are part of the digital graphic arts culture, you need to accept that technology is constantly changing and you either join the change or you fall behind and ultimately lose any relevance with modern commercial art. 

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post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by foljs View Post

And what's to stop them from NOT adding new features (or slowing updates to a crawl) in the future?

You'd still have to pay them every month, despite the lack of any updates, or you wont be able to edit your files.

And, no, using an older CS6 boxed version THEN wont be a solution -- because:

a) it wont recognise all the features created in CC versions, so project made in them won't open or open with missing stuff.
b) it wont have support for the latest graphics cards, peripherals, cpu extensions, etc.
c) it wont be sold forever.
d) a future OS update might render it crippled or unrunnable (e.g forget about running it in some future possible ARM-based Mac laptop).
Truthfully nothing. But that is like the guy who sees a girl and falls in love with her and then divorces her before saying a word. There are always what ifs in life and for now this is the way Adobe is going. Truthfully we a
Earn our years subscription back in a few hours of work so it is not a huge deal but yes, there are drawbacks and compromises and who knows if they will slow down (I suspect that they saw with PageMaker that someone else can always step in and take away their business just like they did with Apple and FCP X.)
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulk001 View Post

While I am not a fan of the subscription I do like that we don't have to wait 8 to 12 months to get upgrades. The criticisms of the subscription service may be pushing Adobe to innovate and the list of improvements, integration and new features that Steve Forde has broken out in his blog are exciting.


But they have only released one "big" version since going to CC... just like they always did with their .5 upgrades.

post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

That's the power of positive thinking!

 

Seriously, if you decide you no longer want the monthly payments, you can end the subscription. Before doing so, you should export all of your inDesign documents to the IDML format so they can be opened in previous versions. Photoshop, historically, can open psd files in an older version. If your psd file contains features that are not supported by the older version, the file still opens but those features cannot be edited. Tiff files can also be saved in layers, so that would be another option. Illustrator files can be saved to any of several earlier versions for compatibility, although the unsupported features will not be saved, but the files will open in the previous version.

 

Or you can end your subscription temporarily while you do not need it, and resubscribe later month to month if that better suits your needs.


Premiere CC can't save a copy that works on CS6. Once you make a project CC, you HAVE to use CC.

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Fundamentally we disagree on the simple premise that a professional organization can afford to stay stagnant over the course of multiple software updates.

 

If they have you locked by the b****s, they sure can.

 

One word for you: Quark (there are tons of other examples from software too).

 

And they didn't even have the luxury of a renting system -- that would have made them even more complacent, because you wouldn't even be able to stop paying and have access to your files.

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

Seriously, fk Adobe! They are arrogant to the Nth degree and make ridiculously bloated and complicated user interfaces, and refuse to adhere to Apples interface standards. They have no concept of ease-of-use and are stealing from their users with the subscription only model.

Wait! Wait! I thought you were talking about Microsoft Office for a while there....
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post #22 of 29
This is the old mainframe software model, particularly as practiced by IBM. Firms did not purchase their mainframe software, they rented it. The personal computer ended that. IBM and Adobe have revived it, albeit at lower prices. We might also take note of this: rentals convert software from a technology product to a public utility. Utility companies are not innovation-free but they are among the least innovative companies in business. Think the phone company, power company, water company, refuse removal, etc.

This notion that freed the need to update existing versions to incorporate bug fixes and security vulnerabilities and to accumulate enough new features to justify a new version, that somehow Adobe will magically give us continual innovation--well, sounds like waiting for the Great Pumpkin. New software has bugs--most do anyway. What folks are really saying is that many bugs will never be fixed. This predicted flood of innovation sounds more like a torrent of bloatware. And what is the advantage upshot of this bloatware? It is certainly less that some are claiming. If you business depends on software, but your employees are struggling to keep-up with the changes in new releases, then those employees are less productive than they should be. The whole point of computer software is to increase productivity, not decrease it.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by studiomusic View Post


But they have only released one "big" version since going to CC... just like they always did with their .5 upgrades.
They have been releasing constant updates and features. But even if you are right the one big update has cost me a lot less than buying the point update would have under the old system. It also has some useful management tools - I can deactivate remotely and activate on a new machine with each login. In the end it comes down to if the old CS 6 features are all you need and keep working for you then don't update.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Agreed! Not a big fan of Adobe. And really abhor subscription services. I don't like companies dipping into my checking acct. every month! Thanks, but no thanks.

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post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by superjunaid View Post

I don't see how a subscription model enables these guys to update the software more frequently, we get updated software with Apple's apps almost every month and for buying it once and getting lifetime of updates.

Yes sure Apple is a hardware company designing software for its' hardware and hence they can get away with such a software update model.

 

It doesn't, fixing bugs and adding good features still takes time months in fact, charging a fair price and upgrading the software works, Adobe like Autodesk are two of the worse software companies out there in terms of offering meaningful upgrades over the years, Autocad 2002 is still the best Autocad ever made. Over the years I just don't trust Adobe very similar to Quark these days.

 

PS, Apple's iWorks last upgrade is faster at loading and saving documents within Pages on a iPad 2, moving around within the program is actually better than before and I'm running iOS 7.1.

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by superjunaid View Post

I don't see how a subscription model enables these guys to update the software more frequently, we get updated software with Apple's apps almost every month and for buying it once and getting lifetime of updates.

Adobe is a publicly traded company so they have to account for their costs. With a product model rather than a service model, you create a final version, sell it and then define a support period, which is included in the costs. The support eventually has to run out otherwise that software version runs out of profit and this forces an upgrade sale in order to pay for the development of the new version.

In Apple's case in terms of software bundled with hardware, they state in their SEC filing:

"Revenue allocated to the unspecified software upgrade rights and non-software services based on the Company’s ESPs is deferred and recognized on a straight-line basis over the estimated period the software upgrades and non-software services are expected to be provided for each of these devices, which ranges from two to four years.

Beginning in September 2013, the combined ESPs for iPhone and iPad were increased by up to $5 to reflect additions to unspecified software upgrade rights due to expansion of essential software bundled with these devices. Accordingly, the range of combined ESPs for iPhone and iPad as of September 2013 is $15 to $25."

That's why they drop things like iOS 7 support from the 3GS as it's over 4 years old. Things like Aperture or Pages, I'm not sure how they account for those but the feature additions are usually minor. There's only been a single version of Aperture on the App Store (v3).

Adobe isn't allowed to add features to the previous version for free otherwise they have to adjust their accounting. AVID got caught out with this and it resulted in them being delisted from NASDAQ because they couldn't adjust their 5 million orders quickly enough:

http://www.sonicscoop.com/2014/03/04/is-avid-ok-or-not-what-the-nasdaq-delisting-really-means-to-pro-tools-users/

"evaluate its current and historical accounting treatment related to bug fixes, upgrades and enhancements to certain products which the company has provided to certain customers.

We are continuing to work very hard to correct the accounting, which is related to nearly 5 million transaction lines spanning eight-and-a half years. We announced that we are targeting completion of the restatement by mid-2014.”

http://www.forbes.com/sites/bobbyowsinski/2014/02/27/major-changes-around-the-corner-for-music-as-avid-delists/

NEC got caught with it too:

http://ww2.cfo.com/accounting-tax/2008/01/why-vsoe-spells-trouble/

and similarly delisted.

The subscription models take away this issue entirely as the revenue is recurring. It's an easy permanent lifeline for a company but every company that wants to still be around in the long-term tries to protect their revenue. Eventually, Adobe's software might reach a point where there's no meaningful updates but what would people prefer to happen, that they go out of business and everybody has to go through a transition to some alternative that would suffer the same fate because they'll plateau too?

Adobe doesn't even have to just add value by updating their own software. They can buy out Maxon and bundle Cinema 4D. They can buyout plugin developers like genarts:

http://www.genarts.com/software/sapphire/overview

They did this with Cycore plugins. Adobe's investors look for growth and they grow subscribers by lowering the entry price. Having a $2000 entry price with limited support has a high barrier to entry and low customer satisfaction because when the support runs out, it eventually creates a problem with either version syncing or some breakage caused by 3rd party software.

The subscription model has its own flaws and they should allow opening and exporting files outside of a valid license but it's not like the standalone license was a great setup either. The reviews for the new model is 4.5/5 from 919 reviews:

http://www.adobe.com/products/creativecloud/reviews.html

It would be much better if it was 1/3rd, 1/5th, 1/10th the cost but the only way it can be is with recurring revenue and subscriber growth. They are at 1.8 million subscribers so far and now make more from it than standalone sales:

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-03-19/adobes-controversial-subscription-model-proves-surprisingly-popular
http://seekingalpha.com/article/2096663-adobe-systems-ceo-discusses-f1q2014-results-earnings-call-transcript

"Driving that customer adoption and satisfaction is the ongoing flow of innovation in the Creative Cloud platform. Coming off our delivery of more than 500 new features and capabilities last year to Creative Cloud subscribers and enterprise users"
post #27 of 29

Quote:

Originally Posted by superjunaid View Post

I don't see how a subscription model enables these guys to update the software more frequently, we get updated software with Apple's apps almost every month and for buying it once and getting lifetime of updates.

Yes sure Apple is a hardware company designing software for its' hardware and hence they can get away with such a software update model.

 

You should consider Apple's business model. They offer software at little to no additional cost to sell hardware. They have an app store which helps push their hardware, yet that also provides a revenue stream without the same level of development costs. Adobe's business model relies on the exact thing that Apple generally tries to commoditize. It should be obvious that you can't compare their business models. You should compare Adobe to another company whose business model is software centric.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


The subscription models take away this issue entirely as the revenue is recurring. It's an easy permanent lifeline for a company but every company that wants to still be around in the long-term tries to protect their revenue. Eventually, Adobe's software might reach a point where there's no meaningful updates but what would people prefer to happen, that they go out of business and everybody has to go through a transition to some alternative that would suffer the same fate because they'll plateau too?

Adobe doesn't even have to just add value by updating their own software. They can buy out Maxon and bundle Cinema 4D. They can buyout plugin developers like genarts:

http://www.genarts.com/software/sapphire/overview

 

I don't know about buying out everything. C4D is used a lot in motion graphics work, so I see why you suggested Maxon. It wouldn't necessarily be good for the future of that software. Typically when a company is bought out, the larger company isn't as aggressive on development cycle. Right now Adobe's software could use an update in color management to better integrate ICC v4 and smooth out color management across various software, especially photoshop and illustrator with after effects. Most of their tools are painfully old. There's so much research over the past decade that hasn't made it into those programs in a meaningful way. They also set up the most awkward workflows even within a single application. I could write pages on that, but I don't feel like it right now. If anyone is truly interested in that, name the application. Going into all of them would take forever.

post #28 of 29
No mention of Adobe supporting the new Mac Pro's dual GPUs in this article. Is there any such news?
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post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

This update is a perfect example of why it is better. They are only updating the video apps. With the old model they would release a new suite with only a few bug fixes to some apps and major new features to others but they were all bundled together. Now the apps can be updated when necessary or as soon as they are ready.

 

It's better until they overhaul one of the applications and it sucks. So far Adobe has been decent about not killing needed features but that's not saying they won't pull an apple one day and totally redesign a key product and omit half of the most critical features in exchange for a more optimized work flow. Having CS6 to fall back on gives me a little confidence that for a few years, at least, I have a suite of tools that I can do work on if the cloud experience goes bad. 

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