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Review: Amazon's Fire TV makes iterative improvements in set-top streaming

post #1 of 49
Thread Starter 
The set-top streaming business got a little more crowded when Amazon announced the Fire TV last week. With voice-activated search, predictive content loading and a gaming "bonus feature," the Internet retail giant is positioning its new device as a cure-all usability for problems plaguing existing products.



As the newest competitor in the battle for the living room, Amazon is late to enter a field with already mature platforms. For example, Apple has its Apple TV, Google has the (arguably flopped) Google TV and Chromecast, and Roku has its own lineup of products.

Priced at $99, the Fire TV is in the same tier as other non-USB dongle streamers and comes packed with the usual assortment of video, audio and second-screen playback capabilities. It is also one of the few content consumption devices built by a subscription service provider, namely Amazon Prime.

Design



Standing only 0.7-inches tall -- including a generous rubberized foot -- Fire TV is thin. As seen in the picture below, the device looks a lot like a smashed Apple TV sans rounded corners.


Apple TV sitting atop Amazon's Fire TV.


Amazon was obviously quite inspired by Apple's set-top box as the Fire TV's design is more than just an homage with a flat matte top, high-gloss sides and buttonless facade. Whereas the Apple TV has a rubberized bottom plate, the Fire TV uses an actual piece of fairly thick rubber. Even the lone white LED status light "breathes" behind a translucent window located on the front panel.



We were initially impressed with what Amazon managed to pack into its little set-top box: Dolby 7.1 surround sound processing, optical audio out, a quad-core 1.7GHz Qualcomm Krait 300 SoC with 2GB of RAM, an Adreno 320 GPU and 8GB of flash storage. That is until we saw the AC adapter.

Unlike the Apple TV, which incorporates an AC/DC module into its small plastic shell, the Fire TV offloads the part in a square-shaped wall wart-style plug that is just large enough to be a pain.



Our A/V setup has so many wires and cables it's most likely in breach of local fire codes, so getting yet another moderately-sized plug to fit posed a challenge. We spent hours piecing together our existing menagerie of adapters in a surge protector feng shui, we dared not disrupt the delicate balance. For this test, Fire TV was powered by an extension cord from a nearby wall outlet in lieu of a more permanent solution.

Like other devices, all Fire TV controls are handled by the included Bluetooth-equipped remote, which incorporates a built-in microphone (and possibly a second, noise-canceling mic) for voice search duties. The aforementioned voice button sits at the very top directly beneath the microphone, while a large circle-shaped four-way toggle and central select button handles GUI navigation. A row of three buttons (return, home and menu) controls contextual menu and system functions, while a final row of three is mapped to audio/video transport.



The remote boasts a soft-touch coating and weight distribution feels good in the hand. It should be noted that two included AAA batteries are required for operation, so the remote is quite a bit heavier than Apple's silver IR blaster. Having a remote that doesn't require line-of-sight to operate is highly convenient and allows the Fire TV to be discreetly placemed behind an HDTV or tucked away in a cabinet.



Setup



Like other streaming products, Fire TV is ready to go right out of the box. Plug it in, connect the HDMI cable and the on-board user interface pops up asking to pair the included remote. After punching in our Wi-Fi credentials, which sadly can't be done via voice recognition (more on that later), we were greeted with about five minutes' worth of system updates.

A short introduction video explained how to use the remote and offered a brief tutorial on Fire TV's card-based GUI before slipping in an ad for Amazon Prime. Since we ordered the unit through our Prime account, the device came pre-configured with passwords and preferences in place, much like the purchase of a new Kindle.

Users can choose whether to download and sync any existing content associated with their Prime account onto Fire TV. For those invested in Amazon's cloud environment, Fire TV boasts a special section for picture viewing via Amazon Cloud Drive, which can be accessed and set up via the home screen.

Setup of individual apps like YouTube and Vevo involves authorizing access using a special number generated by Fire TV and entering it into a service's Web interface. For example, Fire TV will throw up a code for YouTube that can be entered in using YouTube's activation website.

Usage



Voice search is billed as one of Fire TV's main draws. It is the first feature listed on Amazon's comparison chart and something the company touts as being a solution to the ever-present problem of inputting text via a button-limited remote. Apple addressed this with the Remote iOS app's ability to input text via an iPhone or iPad's soft keyboard, but Amazon claims the added automation is more convenient.



The system works by capturing voice input via the remote, sending it to the cloud for processing and beaming results back to Fire TV. In our tests, recognition was dead accurate even with substantial ambient noise like fans and people chatting nearby.

There is a major issue with voice search, however. While the system itself is consistent, all content is funneled to Amazon's own store offerings, leaving third-party apps and services out in the cold. For example, when we searched for "Summit," a movie available on both Netflix and Amazon, the Netflix version was not listed as an available option.



Voice search can be activated from anywhere in Fire TV, but the results always come from Amazon's own servers. Even in the Netflix app, a search for "Summit" calls up Amazon's rental and purchase options. Basically, in its current state, voice search is an always-accessible service that does not have hooks into third-party apps.

As for the interface, Fire TV breaks down screen real estate with a persistent left-hand column of general system categories like Search, Home, Movies, TV, Apps, Settings and others. Each parent group branches into sub-categories that can be browsed or searched to find individual movies, show, games and other content. Navigation is smooth and responsive, with no apparent delay or lag.



The structure is card-based, meaning sub-categories, content and other selections are displayed as virtual cards until selected. Drilling down to a specific movie like "The Avengers" in Prime or Amazon's store will bring up a full-screen page dedicated to that title, complete with images, previews and ways to buy or rent, among other options.

Our first download was Netflix, a service to which we subscribe, followed by Vevo and a few third-party apps. Loading and installation times were minimal, with the longest wait obviously coming from rich content like games.

Prior to testing, we heard reports of spotty video playback on Netflix. Our unit, however, loaded both TV shows and movies quickly, while HD videos played back without stutter or lag. Scrubbing through a show's timeline was smooth with zero buffering time.

For reference, Fire TV was hooked up to a 100Mbps connection piped through Apple's latest AirPort Extreme mini tower and sent over the air via 802.11n Wi-Fi. The device also supports MIMO, which is especially helpful when streaming and scrubbing through 1080p HD movies.



For shows delivered through Prime, loading was even faster. The so-called "ASAP" feature "predicts" movies and TV episodes you are likely to watch next and buffers content for instant playback. In theory, Fire TV learns from your usage patterns and will become increasingly reliable as time goes by.

A testing scenario is perhaps not the best way to showcase ASAP's capabilities, especially as we moved quickly from app to app, played and paused content and constantly switched between services.

We were, however, able to "force" the feature to work in Prime's content menu by watching previews and clips from a movie just before viewing. It's amazing how much difference that little speed boost makes to the overall user experience. With ASAP active, Fire TV felt less like a set-top streamer and more like a dedicated media player.

For those who hate waiting for content to load, ASAP is a more significant advancement in streaming technology than voice search could ever hope to be. It works and it works well.



Gaming is labeled as a "bonus" feature, but Amazon is clearly making a push to bring mobile-style games into the living room. Pickings were slim at launch, with a few noteworthy titles like Minecraft-Pocket Edition and Asphalt 8 join Amazon Game Studio's own futuristic shooter Sev Zero. Most games can be played the included remote -- a great example being side-scroller Badland -- but ideally the sold-separately game controller would be used.

We will share a more thorough assessment of the Fire TV game controller and the system's games in a follow-up segment.

Finally, Fire TV can accept video offloaded from a Kindle HDX tablet in much the same way as an Apple TV handles AirPlay. Currently, the function is limited to Amazon's own slate and the company has not yet announced compatibility with other platforms.

Amazon XRay is also available as a second-screen experience for Kindle Fire HDX owners. The system pulls in-depth information on scenes, characters and trivia from IMDb and displays it on the Kindle while a movie is playing on Fire TV. For now, XRay support is limited to a small number of shows.

Content



Content can make or break a set-top box and luckily for Amazon, its library of TV shows and movies rivals that of Apple's iTunes. Unfortunately, Amazon Prime doesn't represent a better value than Netflix or Hulu Plus, both of which are available on other streamers.

While access to third-party providers like ESPN and Vevo was at one time a differentiator in the set-top streamer game, most services have made their way to each respective platform. Fire TV offers nearly identical support with one glaring omission: HBO Go. The popular provider with shows like "Game of Thrones" is available on Apple TV, Roku and even Chromecast.

Conclusion



Amazon's Fire TV is a well-built and executed device with a good feature set and competitive content library. With 8GB of onboard storage and the ability to download different apps, services and games, Fire TV has the potential to go toe-to-toe with the current generation Apple TV (review) and most other competing devices.



That being said, Amazon's advertised "improvements," like voice search and the ability to play bite-sized games, are not worth the $99 premium; especially so for those who already have a streaming device or don't subscribe to the $99-per-year Amazon Prime service.

Customers who are Amazon Prime members and who don't currently own a set-top box would do well in buying Fire TV. Kindle Fire HDX owners would also reap some additional benefits from the device, but it's clear what Amazon is offering.

The Fire TV is a machine designed for content consumption, more specifically content from Amazon's own store. While the company says the platform is open, so far almost all roads lead back to Amazon movie and TV show purchases, Amazon games and Amazon Prime.

If Amazon were to have offered existing and new Prime members a discount on the Fire TV -- or perhaps given the box away as an added Prime bonus -- the proposition would be much more enticing. Considering content selection, features and price, Fire TV is a good, but far from perfect, product. Just like the others.

Score: 3.5 out of 5



ratings_hl_35.png

Pros

  • Snappy performance
  • Powerful components in a small package
  • Voice search and ASAP work as advertised


Cons

  • Voice search limited to Amazon results
  • Same old music and video content at same old price
  • No HBO Go


Where to buy



The Amazon Fire TV is available for $99 from Amazon.com, which is tax-free in all states but AZ, CA, IN, KS, KY, MA, NC, NJ, NY, ND, NV, PA, TN, TX, WA and WI.
post #2 of 49
I think Prime customers w/o AppleTV or Roku would appreciate a discounted price - especially just after the subscription bump. OTOH, even as a Prime family and happy users we don't need another box in the entertainment center that adds little beyond our existing AppleTV.

And they're all better than my incompetent Samsung so-called smart TV. Which I bought because of pixel quality and cpu for the price. Their idea of OS and software is years out of date.
post #3 of 49
I have seen Apple TVs placed behind the TV and remote still works great!
post #4 of 49
These two pictures seem to show dramatically different widths... Am I right or what am I missing?


Apple TV sitting atop Amazon's Fire TV.


post #5 of 49
I have an appleTV and xbox 360.

The xbox 360 gets the most use as a media streamer / smart tv box.

Amazon rocks and I like what they're doing here but I don't see what this offers beyond my xbox 360
post #6 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Cons
  • No HBO Go

Gotta at least respect Amazon from not hiding the fact it doesn't have HBO GO.




Quote:
Originally Posted by bro2ma View Post

I have seen Apple TVs placed behind the TV and remote still works great!

I still hope the next Apple TV comes with a BT remote. I don't care if it also has a IR sensor for backup but I'd like it to be BT.

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post #7 of 49
Originally Posted by Shogun View Post
Am I right or what am I missing?

 

Perspective.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #8 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eideard View Post

And they're all better than my incompetent Samsung so-called smart TV. Which I bought because of pixel quality and cpu for the price. Their idea of OS and software is years out of date.

Should've saved your money and bought a dumb TV then.  Why use cpu as one of the deciding factors in buying a TV, but not use the Smart feature?  Could've had the best cpu in the world but it's a moot point because smart TVs blow.

 

Also- you should've bought a Sharp, Panasonic, or LG.  Anything but Samsung...

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
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Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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post #9 of 49

PROS:

 

Bluetooth remote.

Optional HARDWARE games controllers.

Games.

 

Why are these not listed as pros? Would I buy a Fire? It lacks AirPlay, so probably not, but it is an improvement in several way over current, long in the tooth Apple TV. And the remote itself seems to have a nicer selection of buttons than the elegantly designed piece of crap that is the Apple TV Remote. Why is it a piece of crap? Typing is a chore, voice input would have clear advantages over this. But by far and away the biggest problem with it is that it's not Bluetooth. When people on this forum tell me to relocate my coffee table so my remote will work better we have serious problems. How many times has my Bluetooth PS3 remote not recognised a button press input in 7 years? Zero.


Edited by Ireland - 4/7/14 at 8:43am
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #10 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

PROS:

Bluetooth remote.
Optional HARDWARE games controllers.
Games.

Why are these not listed as pros? Would I buy a Fire? It lacks AirPlay, so probably not, but it is an improvement in several way over current, long in the tooth Apple TV. And the remote itself seems to have a nicer selection of buttons than the elegantly designed piece of crap that is the Apple TV Remote. Why is it a piece of crap? Typing is a chore, voice input would have clear advantages over this. But by far and away the biggest problem with it is that it's not Bluetooth. When people on this forum tell me to relocate my coffee table so my remote will work better we have serious problems. How many times has my Bluetooth PS3 remote not recognised a button press input in 7 years? Zero.

Agreed the Apple Remote is a pain. I need to point mine directly at it as mine is under a shelf , in view, but indirect.
 
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post #11 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by bro2ma View Post

I have seen Apple TVs placed behind the TV and remote still works great!

 

Not in my house.

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #12 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

PROS:

Bluetooth remote.
Optional games controllers.
Games.

Why are these not listed as pros? Would I buy a Fire? Probably not, because it lacks AirPlay, but it is an improvement in several way over current, long in the tooth Apple TV. And the remote itself seems to have a nicer selection of buttons than the elegantly designed piece of crap that is the Apple TV Remote. Why is it a piece of crap? Typing is a chore, voice input would have clear advantages over this. But by far and away the biggest problem with it is that it's not Bluetooth. When people on this forum tell me to move where my coffee table is located and that it'll work better than you have serious problems. How many times has my Bluetooth PS3 remote not recognised a button press input in 7 years? Zero.

Or you could just wait for the next AppleTV. Whenever that comes.

The OP basically summarized that it's not particularly impressive. The lack of Amazon on the device is meaningless to anyone who doesn't live in the US. I know Hulu still isn't available outside the US, and the only three streaming video options that I know do work are Youtube and Netflix (because it works on the Nintendo consoles) and Crackle.

US companies developing services and hardware that is useless outside their home country to compete with devices/services that aren't locked to the US will be more successful, even if they are not as good for some other reason. LG and Samsung are developing SmartTV's for their home market of Korea that work worldwide, but ultimately are only going to be useful with their domestic services because their ISP's have high bandwidth at low prices. The kind of apps we get for North America are useless and no better than these separate devices. Youtube and Netflix. That's it. The only advantage the TV's have over the boxes is they tend to have h264 decoding in them, but if they support miracast, hey may as well just stream it that way and get rid of the extra boxes and wires.
post #13 of 49
Plex is available on FireTV, and is also available on GoogleTV and Roku. It's a glaring omission on the AppleTV. The article should mention that.
post #14 of 49

I so hate these power-brick things!

 

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #15 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Misa View Post

Or you could just wait for the next AppleTV. Whenever that comes.

 

What? Considering I have just said I'm not buying a Fire what did you think I was going to do?

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #16 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post
 

I so hate these power-brick things!

 

Especially when it's almost as big as the Apple TV all on it's own.

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post #17 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shogun View Post

These two pictures seem to show dramatically different widths... Am I right or what am I missing?


Apple TV sitting atop Amazon's Fire TV.


Skewed perspective due to camera angle.
post #18 of 49

Why not just use your iOS device for the remote? I think if Apple did this, that would make a lot more sense. You're very limited as to what you can do with a dummy remote anyways (IR or BT). Yes, I know everyone doesn't have an iOS device so they would have to make some kind of remote, but I think they should make it so if you used an iOS device that it makes the AppleTV so much more usable vs a standard remote with a few buttons. 

post #19 of 49

Hopefully it's open enough that the hackers can improve on it.

post #20 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post



Agreed the Apple Remote is a pain. I need to point mine directly at it as mine is under a shelf , in view, but indirect.

 



Simple fix for remote issues, use Apple's "Remote" app for iPhone/iPad. Haven't used my actual Apple TV remote in a looong time.
post #21 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jb2017 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post



Agreed the Apple Remote is a pain. I need to point mine directly at it as mine is under a shelf , in view, but indirect.

 



Simple fix for remote issues, use Apple's "Remote" app for iPhone/iPad. Haven't used my actual Apple TV remote in a looong time.

 

That solution is too easy Hmm... Amazon, and Google fishing around can only mean one thing, Apple TV is going to get a major upgrade this year, a new cpu A7, or A8, full iOS capability?

post #22 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jb2017 View Post
 
Simple fix for remote issues, use Apple's "Remote" app for iPhone/iPad. Haven't used my actual Apple TV remote in a looong time.

Except to change the inputs from your TV to your Apple TV.

 

I still like the physical buttons on the remote better, especially for channel surfing, Guide info and muting or volume adjustments. If the iPhone goes to sleep, you have to enter your password and look at the screen to make any selection. Kind of a hassle (Touch ID would simplify it if you have that). No look, no login is better in my opinion. I personally only used Remote app once to test it when it first came out so I'm just speculating on the awkwardness of the operation. I don't use it.

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post #23 of 49

This looks OK, other than the glaring omission of HBO GO.  I mean, huh?  Wow.

 

I'm just waiting for the next AppleTV anyways.  But if that weren't the case, I'd consider this, as I am a Prime member.  

post #24 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Except to change the inputs from your TV to your Apple TV.

 

I still like the physical buttons on the remote better, especially for channel surfing, Guide info and muting or volume adjustments. If the iPhone goes to sleep, you have to enter your password and look at the screen to make any selection. Kind of a hassle. No look, no login is better in my opinion. I personally only used Remote app once to test it when it first came out so I'm just speculating on the awkwardness of the operation. I don't use it.

 



Changing your inputs on the TV requires an actual remote. Neither the Apple TV remote and Remote app can change inputs so not sure how that is a problem. If you don't want your iPhone sleeping, there is a setting within the Remote app called "Stay Connected" or you can just turn off your iPhone/iPad sleep option to "never" for the time being. Mine is set on "Never" but each to their own. But since you used the remote app once since it was released, I would try it again.
post #25 of 49
Well, I'd rather wait for the new Apple TV spec, Amazon and paid writers comparing to the soon to be outdated spec...plus it's better to stream or order thru one Eco system
post #26 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post

This looks OK, other than the glaring omission of HBO GO.  I mean, huh?  Wow.

I'm just waiting for the next AppleTV anyways.  But if that weren't the case, I'd consider this, as I am a Prime member.  

Getting HBO Go is probably in the works. Apple TV was without it for quite some time.
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post #27 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Getting HBO Go is probably in the works. Apple TV was without it for quite some time.

 

Yeah, but that's a HUGE missing link for a device that is being released into a market that already has many other available entries.

 

I mean, it's HBO for crying out loud.  

post #28 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post

Yeah, but that's a HUGE missing link for a device that is being released into a market that already has many other available entries.

I mean, it's HBO for crying out loud.  

Who writes the app? HBO does, not Amazon. If there's a delay then it's HBO dragging their feet.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #29 of 49
I consider it a con that it also needs an external brick power supply vs the built-in power supply of the ATV.
post #30 of 49
Wonder how responsive it will be after a couple of months of downloading a few games and deleting them to make room for others. My android tablet crawls now compared to when it was purchased. Also why does someone not build a browser into these set top boxes to make them proper smart TVs.
post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crosslad View Post

Wonder how responsive it will be after a couple of months of downloading a few games and deleting them to make room for others. My android tablet crawls now compared to when it was purchased. Also why does someone not build a browser into these set top boxes to make them proper smart TVs.

 

Cause that would be dumb.

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Who writes the app? HBO does, not Amazon. If there's a delay then it's HBO dragging their feet.

 

It's not relevant whose fault it is.  It's still a glaring omission.  

post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post
 

 

Yeah, but that's a HUGE missing link for a device that is being released into a market that already has many other available entries.

 

I mean, it's HBO for crying out loud.  

 

You do realize that HBO reports a 29% penetration rate of pay TV subscribers, right? So 70% of those who pay for TV do not have it at all?

 

http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/premium-tv-networks-say-npd-study-purporting-to-show-their-decline-is-hogwash-1201066121/

 

And I bet since HBO is reporting this, I'm sure it includes those who get the "special" 3 months free who are not actually paying for HBO.

 

So for a large majority, they don't care if it has HBO Go. Myself included.

post #34 of 49
I'm trying to figure out what makes this such a big improvement.

oh it has voice control. doesn't work outside of searching Amazon. If you try to use it in something like Netflix you don't get Netflix hits but Amazon ones. So that's basically a fail of an interesting idea.

it's 802.11n despite ac being out so that's no better than everyone else.

it supports 7.1 sound in the hardware but what about the content. Something tells me that most of it is likely still 5.1 so is that a huge deal.

it doesn't need line of sight for the remote. Neither does an Apple TV if you are using a device like an iPhone which many folks are cause the silver remote is a pain in the ass.

it supports Amazon Prime/instant video rather than iTunes. Well that's a parallel issue not an improvement one. Folks highly invested in Amazon aren't likely using iTunes much if at all anyway. And vice versa probably

you can download games to it. Like six games and they either require an iffy experience via the remote or getting a bluetooth controller so that's a wash against using airplay off your device

so what exactly are these "iterative improvements" the headline speaks of

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post #35 of 49
The pressure is on Apple.
If these new Fire TV additions are mocked here as "iterative" then Apple needs something very substantial with their upgrade.
It's been 3 years since SJ announced he'd cracked the TV.
Expect a serious stock drop if otherwise.
We shall see.
 
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post #36 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

I'm trying to figure out what makes this such a big improvement.

oh it has voice control. doesn't work outside of searching Amazon. If you try to use it in something like Netflix you don't get Netflix hits but Amazon ones. So that's basically a fail of an interesting idea.

it's 802.11n despite ac being out so that's no better than everyone else.

it supports 7.1 sound in the hardware but what about the content. Something tells me that most of it is likely still 5.1 so is that a huge deal.

it doesn't need line of sight for the remote. Neither does an Apple TV if you are using a device like an iPhone which many folks are cause the silver remote is a pain in the ass.

it supports Amazon Prime/instant video rather than iTunes. Well that's a parallel issue not an improvement one. Folks highly invested in Amazon aren't likely using iTunes much if at all anyway. And vice versa probably

you can download games to it. Like six games and they either require an iffy experience via the remote or getting a bluetooth controller so that's a wash against using airplay off your device

so what exactly are these "iterative improvements" the headline speaks of

You don't need to buy a $500 phone to get it to work properly so that's a win for Amazon.
 
Where's the new Apple TV?
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Where's the new Apple TV?
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post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post

It's not relevant whose fault it is.  It's still a glaring omission.  

Not really when all things are considered. It's just a matter of time.
 
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post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrboba1 View Post
 

 

You do realize that HBO reports a 29% penetration rate of pay TV subscribers, right? So 70% of those who pay for TV do not have it at all?

 

http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/premium-tv-networks-say-npd-study-purporting-to-show-their-decline-is-hogwash-1201066121/

 

And I bet since HBO is reporting this, I'm sure it includes those who get the "special" 3 months free who are not actually paying for HBO.

 

So for a large majority, they don't care if it has HBO Go. Myself included.

 

I wonder what percentage of people with AppleTV/whatever have HBO.  That's really the number that matters.  If a high percentage of the 70% without HBO also don't have a STB, then that's a fairly irrelevant statistic.

 

HBO has consistently -- for decades now -- been the most high-level programmer, the most awarded programmer, the most innovative programmer.  And remember, it's not just HBO programming that HBO GO allows you to watch.  There are movies.  There's sports.

 

It's a pretty huge thing, HBO.

post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Cause that would be dumb.

Why would it be dumb. For £119 I can buy a Tesco Hudl with quad core processor , 16gb memory and HDMI out. I can connect it to a TV and do more than the Amazon Fire TV does and can connect Bluetooth keyboard, mouse and game controller. I could then take it with me wherever I go. Much more useful than Fire TV. I want my TV box to do everything a tablet can do on my TV.
post #40 of 49
Wall Wart is a deal killer to me. My Apple TVs are hidden behind the TV; many have a little indent that they squeeze into nicely without any tape or other mounting material. I can even still use the remote when I angle the AppleTV just right so the sensor is visible, and bounce the IR off the ceiling. A wall wart means you cannot hide it behind the TV, at least not without an extra cable running exposed.

Surprised Amazon couldn't do any better, given that the Apple TV hasn't really been updated in years.
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