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Apple's iOS 7 reaches 87% adoption, still growing faster than Android 4.4 KitKat - Page 2

post #41 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


That's a good argument¡ 1hmm.gif

 

I don't know what to say.  It is equivalent.  Apple adds new features and updates some parts of the system on integer updates while Google does those things to Android on point updates.  On Android, integer updates seem to come only with major overhauls of the system and/or major UI overhauls; I've never seen it defined explicitly.

 

Apple seems to use point updates for bug fixing or small tweaks while point-point updates are used for critical bugs that need to be patched before a more broad release can be fully tested.  On Android the point-point updates are equivalent to Apple's point updates where bugs are fixed and small tweaks are made.  Sometimes Android's point-point updates come with a very short changelog to fix a critical bug (4.0.1, 4.1.1, and 4.2.1) but other times they fix a long list of bugs (4.0.4, 4.2.2, and the rumored 4.4.3), so these updates are equivalent to both Apple's point and point-point updates.

 

Then there's the issue of Android's version naming, whose relation to update numbering I haven't been able to determine.  Jellybean covered 4.1 to 4.3 with each point update adding new features and updating core system components.  Looking back, all three versions of Jellybean were more similar to one another than to either Ice Cream Sandwich or KitKat, but there were substantial differences between them nonetheless.  I'm leaning toward UI design updates defining the naming scheme, but it doesn't quite work because 4.2 brought at least as many visual changes as 4.4.  Maybe someone else can shed some light on the naming convention.

post #42 of 82
The largest percentage of Android users accessing the Play Store are using a version of Android that came out in mid-2012

The next largest percentage are using a version of Android from late-2012.

But the next largest percentage are using a version from 2010-2011

What I'm seeing is it takes a looong time for a particular version of Android to reach critical mass.

So... if Google releases some great new feature in a version of Android... developers probably won't even bother implementing that feature because no one can really use for a couple of years.

Am I reading that correctly? That's got to be frustrating...
post #43 of 82
It's still a lousy GUI and I'm still staying with iOS 6 and not buying a new iOS device until Apple undoes it's GUI destruction disaster, if it ever does.
post #44 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Outside internet tech forums I don't know of anyone that complains about iOS 7 and wishes they could go back to iOS 6.

Then you need to go to other forums. The people at KVR Audio forums are equally disgusted with iOS 7.

My Facebook acquaintances who talk about their iOS devices also dislike iOS 7, agreeing with my analyses of the GUI changes. My close friend and Apple fan also has indicated her rejection of iOS 7, and a general disinterest in upgrades overall, thanks to seeing how they historically slow down her devices.

There are many people out there who dislike iOS 7. In fact, the only people I see talking positively about iOS 7 are here and on the Macrumors forum. In other words: fanboys, and those who like change for the sake of change.
post #45 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

It's still a lousy GUI and I'm still staying with iOS 6 and not buying a new iOS device until Apple undoes it's GUI destruction disaster, if it ever does.
Well then I guess you'll never be buying an iOS device again because Apple isn't going back to the Stone Age aka iOS 1-6. Oh and at WWDC Apple will be announcing a redesign of OS X so I guess no more Macs for you either (if you own any).
Edited by Rogifan - 4/8/14 at 5:54am
post #46 of 82
I call BS on all the "I don't like iOS 7 and everyone I talk to agrees with me" posts. There is no way that Apple could be selling as many iPhones and iPads as it has, or have 87% of devices accessing the App Store running iOS 7 if it was hated as much as some claim. People would either not be upgrading their device or buying something else. But some how Apple,was able to sell 51M iPhones and 26M iPads, even though everyone supposedly hates iOS 7 and it's the worst UI in the history of software. Right...
post #47 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post
 

 

I don't know what to say.  It is equivalent.  Apple adds new features and updates some parts of the system on integer updates while Google does those things to Android on point updates.  On Android, integer updates seem to come only with major overhauls of the system and/or major UI overhauls; I've never seen it defined explicitly.

 

Apple seems to use point updates for bug fixing or small tweaks while point-point updates are used for critical bugs that need to be patched before a more broad release can be fully tested.  On Android the point-point updates are equivalent to Apple's point updates where bugs are fixed and small tweaks are made.  Sometimes Android's point-point updates come with a very short changelog to fix a critical bug (4.0.1, 4.1.1, and 4.2.1) but other times they fix a long list of bugs (4.0.4, 4.2.2, and the rumored 4.4.3), so these updates are equivalent to both Apple's point and point-point updates.

One should also note that iOS relies more heavily on OS updates to upgrade its core services. For example, Android doesn't need a OS revision to get updates to Chrome or the calendar app, because those components are upgraded through Google Play just like with any other app. If you compare the percentages of Android and iOS users on the latest version of their browser, the numbers would be much closer than the OS version distribution figures would suggest.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 4/8/14 at 7:50am
post #48 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

It's still a lousy GUI and I'm still staying with iOS 6 and not buying a new iOS device until Apple undoes it's GUI destruction disaster, if it ever does.

Enjoy what you go to. Plenty of good options out there.
post #49 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Somebody needs to ban the use of pie charts. 1oyvey.gif

Is that because you're on a diet and they represent temptation?
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
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post #50 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

That's an amazing number for a mobile OS version that is worst thing to ever happen to humanity and proof Apple can't survive without Steve Jobs¡
I agree¡ We should replace pie charts with varying degrees of open Pac-Man mouthes.

Miss Pac-Man. 😊
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
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post #51 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post

Am I the only one who has the feeling that DED's repeat button is stuck on 'on'? 1smile.gif
It's well known that the adoption of Android updates is slower then that of iOS updates and the reasons for that are also well known, there is really no reason in repeating it to no end :s.

You're right; it must be disconcerting to constantly see bad news for Google when you're constantly trying to defend Google on an Apple website, come what may.
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post #52 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

Miss Pac-Man. 😊

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #53 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


😄
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
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post #54 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

In Android's version numbering system, a point update is equivalent to an entire integer update on iOS.

That's not true. There really isn't any really solid comparison between the two numbers, as Apple's consistently represents a years worth of development, while Android releases may increment several times in a few months.

Version numbers are arbitrary. Even googles desert names are meaningless. It's been selling Jelly Bean for two years, then came up with a new name for KitKat despite being essentially the same thing.

What is comparable is the length of time following a release that users have to wait to get it, or a comparison of what each vendor was offering in, say, 2010. A third of android users are still stuck with Android software released back in 2010 when Apple was selling iOS 4.
post #55 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

Actually percent change is the only way to compare growth rates. In other words you misused the word faster in your comparison of the growth. KitKat is changing more rapidly but controlling less market share. iOS 7 is adding more market share but changing more slowly.

That's false. KitKat was a minor bump that added support for slower, lower speced phones. It was not a big release.

iOS 7 was a major release. Both were unveiled around the same time. It's just that most android uses can't upgrade, while essentially all iOS users already have.

Apple achieved greater adoption much faster than KitKat, in large part because Apple simply makes its software releases available to all of its users at once.
post #56 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

One should also note that iOS relies more heavily on OS updates to upgrade its core services. For example, Android doesn't need a OS revision to get updates to Chrome or the calendar app, because those components are upgraded through Google Play just like with any other app. If you compare the percentages of Android and iOS users on the latest version of their browser, the numbers would be much closer than the OS version distribution figures would suggest.

Wrong. Google didn't release Chrome until 2012, and it requires a minimum of Android 4.0, which excludes a third of the active installed base on Google Play.

So no. How do you even come up with this stuff? Sounds like you're a temp worker reading off a talking points card and haven't even ever used Android.
post #57 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Wrong. Google didn't release Chrome until 2012, and it requires a minimum of Android 4.0, which excludes a third of the active installed base on Google Play.

So no. How do you even come up with this stuff? Sounds like you're a temp worker reading off a talking points card and haven't even ever used Android.

Actually just shy of a fifth of the installed base not a third but close enough.
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #58 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

That's false. KitKat was a minor bump that added support for slower, lower speced phones. It was not a big release.

iOS 7 was a major release. Both were unveiled around the same time. It's just that most android uses can't upgrade, while essentially all iOS users already have.

Apple achieved greater adoption much faster than KitKat, in large part because Apple simply makes its software releases available to all of its users at once.

No, KitKat was a major release that had an extensive changelog https://developer.android.com/about/versions/kitkat.html .

And yes, iOS 7 adoption was faster. Currently, though, it is not growing faster according to basic math.
post #59 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

That's not true. There really isn't any really solid comparison between the two numbers, as Apple's consistently represents a years worth of development, while Android releases may increment several times in a few months.

Version numbers are arbitrary. Even googles desert names are meaningless. It's been selling Jelly Bean for two years, then came up with a new name for KitKat despite being essentially the same thing.

What is comparable is the length of time following a release that users have to wait to get it, or a comparison of what each vendor was offering in, say, 2010. A third of android users are still stuck with Android software released back in 2010 when Apple was selling iOS 4.

I'll refer you to my post above where I explain why they're equivalent. Care to provide evidence to refute it?
post #60 of 82
Quote:
Wrong. Google didn't release Chrome until 2012, and it requires a minimum of Android 4.0, which excludes a third of the active installed base on Google Play.

So no. How do you even come up with this stuff? Sounds like you're a temp worker reading off a talking points card and haven't even ever used Android.

It's not just Chrome. The full list of Google apps updated through the Play Store is Gmail, Google+, Google Search, Maps, YouTube, Google Text-to-Speech, Street View, Chrome, Hangouts, Play Books, Play Newsstand, Play Games, Play Music, Play Movies & TV, Voice Search, Google Drive, Google Earth, Quickoffice, Google Translate, Google Keep, SoundSearch, TalkBack Accessibility, Cloud Print, Google Wallet, Google Voice, Google Keyboard, Google Offers, and many other niche apps.
post #61 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

No, KitKat was a major release that had an extensive changelog https://developer.android.com/about/versions/kitkat.html .

And yes, iOS 7 adoption was faster. Currently, though, it is not growing faster according to basic math.

Android 4.4 "features":
  1. Refreshed interface with white elements instead of blue
  2. Clock no longer shows bold hours, all digits are thin. The H, M, and S markings for the stopwatch and timer have been removed, leaving just the numbers.
  3. Ability for applications to trigger translucency in the navigation and status bars[127]
  4. Ability for applications to use "immersive mode" to keep the navigation and status bars hidden while maintaining user interaction[128]
  5. Action overflow menu buttons are always visible, even on devices with a hardware "Menu" key, which was officially deprecated by Android 4.0[129]
  6. Optimizations for performance on devices with lower specifications, including zRAM support and "low RAM" device API[123]
  7. Wireless printing capability[123]
  8. NFC host card emulation, enabling a device to replace smart cards[123]
  9. WebViews now based on Chromium engine (feature parity with Chrome for Android 30)
  10. Removal of unofficial Flash Player support
  11. Expanded functionality for notification listener services[123]
  12. Public API for developing and managing text messaging clients[130]
  13. New framework for UI transitions
  14. Storage access framework for retrieving content and documents from other sources
  15. Sensor batching, step detector and counter APIs[123]
  16. Settings application now makes it possible to select default text messaging and home (launcher) application
  17. Audio tunneling, audio monitoring and loudness enhancer[131]
  18. Built-in screen recording feature (primarily for developers, as usage of ADB is required)[132]
  19. Native infrared blaster API
  20. Expanded accessibility APIs and system-level closed captioning settings
  21. New experimental runtime virtual machine, ART (not enabled by default)[133]
  22. Bluetooth Message Access Profile (MAP) support[134]
  23. Disabled access to battery statistics by third-party applications[135]
  24. Settings application no longer uses a multi-pane layout on devices with larger screens
  25. Wi-Fi and mobile data activity (TX/RX) indicators are moved to quick settings[136]
  26. Applications' write access to secondary storage (memory cards on devices with internal primary storage) is made possible but restricted to their designated private directories only, while full access to internal primary storage is still allowed through a separate application-level permission.[67][68]


iOS 7[.0.0] changelog:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
  1. UI
  2. Flat design and move away from skeuomorphism in general (exceptions exist - for a move towards more skeuomorphism, see for example the Countdown with a new skeuomorphic 3D animation of a spinning wheel).
  3. System Helvetica Neue Regular font.
  4. Full Screen apps that make use of the system status bar and navigation bar.
  5. Translucent design in tab bar, navigation bar, status bar, system keyboard, Control Center, and Notification Center (some translucent layers not on iPhone 4, iPad 2 or iPad (3rd generation)).
  6. Opaque design in Alert view, Action Sheet and Share Sheet.
  7. Borderless buttons in general.
  8. Back navigation gesture by swiping from left edge of the screen.
  9. New UI for arranging tab-bar icons.
  10. System-wide dynamic font size, configurable in Settings.
  11. Enhance the viewing experience of non-iPad apps on Retina iPads, remove the 1x and 2x toggle, apps are opened in ’2x’ mode by default on non-Retina iPads.
  12. Home Screen
  13. Search dialog is now accessible on each screen by pulling it down.
  14. "New" banner on newly installed apps have been replaced with blue dots.
  15. Brand new icons for built-in apps.
  16. Newsstand is now a dedicated app instead of a folder.
  17. Control Center
  18. A unified screen to quickly access toggles and controls for system settings and services, and for using AirDrop and AirPlay.
  19. System wide, accessible by swiping upward from the bottom of the screen.
  20. Accessible in the lock screen.
  21. Flashlight (device-specific features that come with physical camera) toggle button.
  22. Landscape support.
  23. A grabber in full screen apps.
  24. Mute/silent toggle button in iPad.
  25. CarPlay
  26. Providing iOS control to in-car control systems on some car models by selected vendors from 2014.
  27. Includes Siri integration (eyes-free/hands-free modes), satellite navigation, telephony, music, and iMessage integration.
  28. AirDrop P5, P5C, P5S, T5, S4, M1
  29. Integrates Apple's ad-hoc Wi-Fi sharing feature AirDrop (iPhone 5 and later, iPad (4th generation) and later, and iPad Mini (1st generation) and later).
  30. Alert view, for receive invitation from other devices, option to accept/cancel.
  31. Options to set discoverable: Off/Contacts only/Everyone.
  32. Inter-app Audio
  33. Register audio streams to share with other apps.
  34. Provides for MIDI control of audio rendering, remotely launching other registered Inter-App Audio apps.
  35. Notification Center
  36. Accessible in the lock screen.
  37. Today tab, for previewing the events calendar, stocks, and tomorrows events; provides traffic info on frequently visited places.
  38. Missed filter: can filter list to see notifications that occurred when phone was not actively in use.
  39. Bounces when swiped down quickly.
  40. Folders
  41. Unlimited number of apps via folder subpages.
  42. Newsstand app can now be moved inside any folder.
  43. Transparent background.
  44. Folders change color when apps are downloading and clock-like animated progress graphic is superimposed over folders that have actively downloading apps.
  45. Alert
  46. A countdown for snooze.
  47. Calculator
  48. New feedback when pressing a key.
  49. Toggle landscape mode button.
  50. Spotlight
  51. Accessible on every page of the Home screen by swiping downward from anywhere.
  52. New animation.
  53. Multitasking
  54. Redesigned switcher, with horizontal scrolling for previewing all running apps, and swipe upward gesture to stop any running apps.
  55. Can close multiple apps simultaneously by swiping with multiple fingers.
  56. Landscape switcher.
  57. Smart background app running mode; fetches data based on network connectivity and user habits.
  58. Use apps while the app is updating.
  59. Wallpapers
  60. New wallpapers.
  61. Dynamic wallpapers.P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5, S2, S3, S4, M1
  62. Gyroscope-responsive parallax wallpaper effect, based on user's movement.P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5, S2, S3, S4, M1
  63. Weather
  64. Dynamic animation for different weathers (iPhone 4S and later and iPod Touch (5th generation)).P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5
  65. Shows sunrise/sunset humidity, chance of precipitation, and wind speed.
  66. Can see multiple locations simultaneously when the menu icon is selected.
  67. Can select GPS icon at bottom to immediately see weather for current location.
  68. Phone
  69. Block list.
  70. Contact pictures on Favorites.
  71. Transparency in the number pad button when pressing.
  72. Phone History and Voicemail Info options allow one to return the call in multiple ways including call back, FaceTime and Messaging.
  73. Contacts
  74. New fields in Contacts: "Add Social Profile", and "Add Instant Message".
  75. "Chat", "FaceTime", "Mail" buttons next to the contact information; no longer need to scroll down to the bottom.
  76. Send contacts through AirDrop.
  77. FaceTime
  78. FaceTime Audio.
  79. Block list.
  80. A dedicated app on the iPhone, like the previous version on iPod Touch and iPad.
  81. Messages
  82. Long SMS.
  83. Block list.
  84. No longer have to scroll to the top to access "Call", "FaceTime", and "Info".
  85. Contact pictures in group chats.
  86. Ability to see exact time of when each message was sent by dragging conversation bubbles to the left.
  87. Event and address detection in the message context, tap to open in Calendar and Maps.
  88. A contact with a nickname will appear in Messages under the nickname, rather than the full name.
  89. New animation when compressing video to be shared.
  90. Safari
  91. Full screen browsing, the previous version only support in iPhone landscape mode.
  92. Unified text field for both URL and search.
  93. Bookmarked website thumbnail icons appear when text field is activated.
  94. Top-hit, Google suggest, Bookmarks, and History appear on the unified text field while typing.
  95. Preview tabs on iPhone and iPod Touch are no longer limited to 8.
  96. Preview tabs use new 3D vertical animation for previewing the opened tabs; long press to edit positions, swipe to remove.
  97. Reading List shows website thumbnails on the right.
  98. Scrolls articles one-by-one vertically from Reading List, as per OS X Mavericks.
  99. Swipe gestures for back/previous history, as per OS X.
  100. Parental controls.
  101. Private button: enables "Do not track me." feature per website within the app. Previously, configuration appeared in Settings for every website.
  102. Recent links: a reading list of all user's friends on Facebook or Twitter post.
  103. Reading List button: new round glasses icon pays tribute to Steve Jobs.
  104. The .com button removed and replaced with a simple period button. The .com, .net, and .org domain extensions can be accessed by holding down on the button.
  105. Bookmarks/Reading List/Shared Links tabs re-ordered/slightly tweaked.
  106. New bolder loading bar, private browsing UI tweaks and tab/bookmark changes on the iPad .
  107. iCloud
  108. Photo Stream video support, and more than one contributor per photo stream.
  109. Notification Sync across different iCloud devices.
  110. Maps
  111. Automatic Day/Night Mode that responds to ambient light and current time to switch between day and night color schemes.
  112. Turn-by-turn walking directions, with estimated time.
  113. Maps bookmarks syncing.
  114. Receives notification data sent from the new Maps app in OS X Mavericks (version 10.9).
  115. A live compass at the right top corner.
  116. Clock
  117. App icon reflects the live time.
  118. Timer shows in the lock screen.
  119. City shows how many hours ahead/behind from your current location.
  120. Music
  121. New iTunes Radio service.
  122. Scrub along the song to get to a certain part directly from the lock screen.
  123. Download full albums from iCloud from iTunes Match.
  124. Tapping a song in the Now-Playing screen allows users to rate.
  125. Cover Flow: Instead of swiping though individual albums, one can now swipe through multiple albums.
  126. Reintroduced on-screen lyrics for iPads (this feature was absent in iOS 5 and iOS 6).
  127. iTunes Radio
  128. Slider/discovery feature.
  129. App Store
  130. Automatic app updates: switch to enable/disable in Settings, under iTunes, App Store.
  131. New catalogues for kids based on their age.
  132. Genius tab replaced with "Apps Near Me" tab for app recommendations based on user's location.
  133. Volume purchase.
  134. Search tab redesigned, the number of results appears on the right of the search field.
  135. Circular download progress animation during downloading/updating in Home Screen.
  136. Add to wish list.
  137. It is now possible to download older versions of apps (the last compatible version supported by the device legacy firmware).
  138. iTunes
  139. Smart download of TV episodes.
  140. Photos
  141. Albums are organized by Places, Moments, and Years, using the EXIF data as the base of the collection.
  142. Share Sheet shares photos to iCloud, social networks, and AirDrop (if available).
  143. New default album "Panorama Photos".
  144. Camera
  145. Control redesign: swipe horizontally to select the still images, videos, square photos, and Panorama modes (if available).
  146. Live image filters. P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5
  147. SDK for 60 FPS video recording.
  148. Pinch to zoom while video recording.
  149. Redeem iTunes gift card using front camera.
  150. Panorama reduces when battery is low.[clarification needed]
  151. Slow motion video recording at 120 frames per second.P5S
  152. Burst mode.P5S
  153. High-dynamic-range imaging (HDR) for iPad.
  154. Calendar
  155. New layout for Calendar list view on the iPhone.
  156. Years view.
  157. Week view.
  158. Integration with Mail.
  159. Integration with Maps, users are notified with transit information when entering places information.
  160. Can now hide or show declined events.
  161. Will support custom calendar colors.
  162. All Day toggle on the Add Event Screen instead of buried in the Select Time control.
  163. Can snooze or View Event when an Event Reminder appears.
  164. Can set up a second alert time for an event.
  165. Can change Busy/Free Status.
  166. Selecting the name of the calendar month shows the monthly calendar.
  167. Game Center
  168. Secure game scores.
  169. Authenticated players.
  170. Turn-based game modes.
  171. Ranking-style leader boards.
  172. Compass
  173. Inclinometer.
  174. Mail
  175. View PDF annotation.
  176. New smart mailboxes.
  177. Improved Mail search.
  178. Hotmail is now Outlook when adding an account, using new Outlook icon.
  179. Flagged, Unread, To or CC, Attachments, All drafts, All sent, All Trash smart mailboxes.
  180. Shake to Undo to un-archive something.
  181. When emailing a passbook pass, it appears as a pass.
  182. New animation when compressing video to be shared.
  183. New animation when moving mail into a folder.
  184. When selecting a target folder while moving an email, an iconic image of the email above the folder selector appears.
  185. Have the ability to move an email to Junk folder when flagging.
  186. New Print option available when Reply option is selected.
  187. Notes
  188. New design, mostly white.
  189. No longer change fonts in Notes.
  190. Can AirDrop notes.
  191. Settings
  192. Per app cellular data usage permission.
  193. Per app using microphone privacy permission.
  194. Per app using camera privacy permission.
  195. Password required to reset networking and contents.
  196. Accessibility
  197. Head movement detection for different gestures.
  198. China features
  199. Tencent Weibo social network integration.
  200. Chinese-English bilingual dictionary.
  201. Improved Chinese input including T9 keyboard for pinyin (Added in Beta 4), and handwriting recognition for multiple Chinese characters.
  202. Siri
  203. Updated voices, and a new male voice (in select regions/languages). English (US), French, and German will be available with the launch of iOS 7 (additional languages will be added over time).
  204. Controls certain system settings, such as turning on/off Bluetooth, and changing display brightness.
  205. Search from Wikipedia and Bing search engines.
  206. Post to Sina Weibo.
  207. Search tweets on Twitter.
  208. Option to open MLB scores in the MLB.com At Bat app.
  209. Navigation, access and voice are more natural.
  210. Reminders
  211. Geofencing.
  212. Ability to create repeating reminders has been removed.
  213. Passbook
  214. Scan and recognize barcodes/QR codes.
  215. Add gift cards as a folder.
  216. Find My iPhone
  217. Activation Lock: re-activation with iCloud account if the device have been wiped remotely using Find My iPhone service, to prevent unauthorized usage of the lost device.
  218. Password required to disable.
  219. Enterprise
  220. Enterprise single sign-on.
  221. Per app VPN.
  222. Managed app config, for more efficiently deploying and managing of iPhones and iPads.
  223. Accessories
  224. Unauthorized Lightning cables are blocked and can no longer be used.[93]
  225. Set up and configure Wi-Fi accessories, such as AirPlay speakers.
  226. iBeacons, a new class of Bluetooth LE low-powered, low-cost transmitters that can notify devices of other nearby devices/services.
  227. Bluetooth LE profiles; including time, notifications, keyboards, and stereo sound.
  228. MFi game controllers.
  229. Screenshot
  230. No longer included in the Assistive Touch, they appear on the layer of the image.
  231. Trusted Devices
  232. User is warned when plugging their iOS device into their Mac/PC, "Trust the currently connected computer? Trusting this computer will allow it to have full access to your device and all of its data."
  233. Voice Memo
  234. New design.
  235. Save to iCloud.
  236. Share using AirDrop.
  237. Status bar
  238. Translucent design.
  239. 1xRTT icon on CDMA iPhones changed from "o" icon to "1x" icon.
  240. GPRS icon on GSM iPhones changed from "o" icon to "GPRS" icon.
  241. Dots representations for cellular signal strength.
  242. Icon size slightly increased for better readability on the lock screen.
  243. Lock screen
  244. Charging the battery: rather than battery image on the lock screen, x% charged briefly appears under the clock, then reverts to the date.
  245. Access to Notification Center and Control Center.
  246. When playing music, the lock screen will now display the time.
  247. iPad has Camera control on the lock screen, like the previous version on iPhone and iPod Touch.
  248. Timer counting down is shown when the device is locked.
  249. Scrubbing bar is now displayed on the lock screen.
  250. Wi-Fi
  251. New Wi-Fi diagnostics mode.
  252. Wi-Fi Hotspot 2.0.
  253. Other
  254. New first-time setup menus.
  255. Add Passcode Lock during Setup Assistant.
  256. Vimeo and Flickr social network integrations.
  257. Italian, Korean, and Dutch dictionaries.
  258. New fade animation when pressing the power button.
  259. New Tamil keyboard.
  260. New ringtones and system sounds.



(You can remove 48 of these as they are category headings for changes. Yeah, they have that many changes.)

Also note that list isn't even close to exhaustive as it doesn't list developer features like frameworks and APIs that were added whereas the KitKat change log does list APIs and frameworks. Apple adds thousands of new APIs each year with excellent documentation to go along with it.


And here is 7.1, that measly point update we just had:

  1. CarPlayP5 P5C P5S
  2. iOS experience designed for the car (iPhone 5 and later).
  3. Works by connecting a Lightning enabled iPhone to a CarPlay enabled vehicle.
  4. Supports Phone, Messages, Maps, and audio apps (inc. Music and third-party).
  5. Siri (except P4 P4C S2 S2C)
  6. Manually control when Siri listens by holding down the Home button while you speak, then releasing it when you're finished.
  7. New, more natural sounding male and female voices for Chinese, UK English, Australian English, and Japanese.
  8. iTunes Radio
  9. Search field above Featured Stations to create stations based on Artist or Song.
  10. Buy albums directly from the Now Playing screen.
  11. Accessibility
  12. Bold font option now includes the keyboard, calculator, and many icon glyphs.
  13. Reduce Motion option now includes Weather, Messages, and multitasking UI animations.
  14. New options to display button shapes, darken app colors, and reduce white point.
  15. Calendar
  16. Option to display event list with the month view.
  17. Country specific holidays automatically added for many countries.
  18. List view has been redesigned.
  19. UI
  20. Camera app has a new "HDR Auto" feature.P5S
  21. Photos & Camera tab in iOS Settings has a new "Upload Burst Photos" option.
  22. You can disable Parallax effect independently of other animations when setting up wallpaper.
  23. Notification Center now displays "No Notifications" and "No Missed Notifications" for the "All" and "Missed" sections respectively when there are no notifications.
  24. Caller ID photos: no longer full screen, instead small circle portrait for incoming/outgoing calls.[94]
  25. New Yahoo logo, in both Notification Center and the Weather app.
  26. A new dialogue "Touch ID requires your passcode when iPhone restarts" when restarting.P5S
  27. New iPad wallpapers.
  28. "Touch ID and Passcode" has been moved-up to the main menu in Settings.
  29. Animations and transitions are noticeably faster.
  30. Keyboard has new Shift/Backspace key highlights.
  31. Control Center has a new "spring" animation upon opening.
  32. Control Center sliders — volume and brightness — have momentum.
  33. Wi-Fi toggle in Control Center now black when Wi-Fi not available (greyed-out in Settings)
  34. Icons for Phone, Messages and FaceTime apps have less vibrant colors.
  35. Music app: Albums now in descending order when browsing by Artist.
  36. Numerous changes that make iOS 7 whole, consistent.
  37. The Phone app has a new-look dialer.
  38. The slide-to-power-off UI has been redesigned.
  39. Bug Fixes/Improvements
  40. Touch ID fingerprint recognition is improved.
  41. Improved performance.P4
  42. Fixes a home screen crash bug.
  43. Fixes display of Mail unread badge for numbers greater than 10,000.
  44. iCloud Keychain support in additional countries.
  45. FaceTime call notifications, automatically clear when call answered on another device.
  46. iBeacon improvements.[95]
  47. Patches 41 security exploits, including those used by the Evasi0n 7 jailbreak.[96]

(And you can minus 7 of the items from this list for the previously stated reason.)

So even that piddly iOS 7.1 point update kills Android 4.4 which you claim is a major release. That just makes it sadder in my opinion.


PS: Thank you for having me look this up because I didn't realize the disparity between iOS and Android updates were as vast but you've inadvertently shown everyone here the truth.
Edited by SolipsismX - 4/8/14 at 10:11am

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #62 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

That's false. KitKat was a minor bump that added support for slower, lower speced phones. It was not a big release.

iOS 7 was a major release. Both were unveiled around the same time. It's just that most android uses can't upgrade, while essentially all iOS users already have.

Apple achieved greater adoption much faster than KitKat, in large part because Apple simply makes its software releases available to all of its users at once.

I wouldn't call an entirely new compiling method a 'bump'. That's a big change to the inner workings of the OS.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #63 of 82
To Solipsism re changelog comparison:

BAM!!!
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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post #64 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Android 4.4 "features": etc


iOS 7[.0.0] changelog: etc

So even that piddly iOS 7.1 point update kills Android 4.4 which you claim is a major release. That just makes it sadder in my opinion.


PS: Thank you for having me look this up because I didn't realize the disparity between iOS and Android updates were as vast but you've inadvertently shown everyone here the truth.
Really nice work Soli. One quibble tho and probably never entered your mind: Many feature and security updates are no longer delivered with an Android update. Google now uses Google Play Services to accomplish much of what Apple uses OS updates for.
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #65 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Really nice work Soli. One quibble tho and probably never entered your mind: Many feature and security updates are no longer delivered with an Android update. Google now uses Google Play Services to accomplish much of what Apple uses OS updates for.

I considered that, but since those are not a part of KitKat but some lateral update feature via GooglePlay it's not an Android update and therefore not included. If Apple decided to make all their default apps in iOS — like Mail, Safari, Messages, FaceTime, etc. — App Store apps that were no longer updated via iOS I wouldn't count them just as I don't count Pages, Numbers, Keynote, Find My Friends, Find My iPhone, iMovie and iPhoto as part of the iOS changelog (and I think those are all free or free with the purchase of an iOS-based device).

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #66 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I considered that, but since those are not a part of KitKat but some lateral update feature via GooglePlay it's not an Android update and therefore not included. If Apple decided to make all their default apps in iOS — like Mail, Safari, Messages, FaceTime, etc. — App Store apps that were no longer updated via iOS I wouldn't count them just as I don't count Pages, Numbers, Keynote, Find My Friends, Find My iPhone, iMovie and iPhoto as part of the iOS changelog (and I think those are all free or free with the purchase of an iOS-based device).

Then in some ways Google Play Services is a better or at least more timely update solution than what Apple offers. New mail, map, search, music etc, etc features get out to Google Android users without waiting for an update of the entire OS (that may never come 1rolleyes.gif )
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #67 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Then in some ways Google Play Services is a better or at least more timely update solution than what Apple offers.

I agree with that.

It's still a Band-Aid on a fragmentation problem they created with poor inital planning but I contend it's a good Band-Aid.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #68 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

To Solipsism re changelog comparison:

BAM!!!

More like.



My hat's off to Soli for a job well done.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #69 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I considered that, but since those are not a part of KitKat but some lateral update feature via GooglePlay it's not an Android update and therefore not included. If Apple decided to make all their default apps in iOS — like Mail, Safari, Messages, FaceTime, etc. — App Store apps that were no longer updated via iOS I wouldn't count them just as I don't count Pages, Numbers, Keynote, Find My Friends, Find My iPhone, iMovie and iPhoto as part of the iOS changelog (and I think those are all free or free with the purchase of an iOS-based device).

But if Apple decided to decouple their system apps from the base OS like Android now does, then the import of rapid adoption of iOS updates would be diminished and this issue probably would not make the news because many user-facing changes would happen independently of the OS version number. This is how updates have always worked for desktop OS's. People don't make a huge deal of the quarter of Mac users still using Snow Leopard, an OS from 2009 which according to some researchers actually lags Vista in some aspects of kernel security (http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9137992/Apple_missed_security_boat_with_Snow_Leopard_says_researcher). The reason is that although the base OS is dated, the system is modular and lets users substitute the outdated system apps, like Safari 5.1, with modern equivalents like Chrome that regularly receive security updates. Other components such as iTunes also receive patches independently of the OS version number. Security vulnerability in Flash Player? No problem, just update Flash Player. 

post #70 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Android 4.4 "features":
  1. Refreshed interface with white elements instead of blue
  2. Clock no longer shows bold hours, all digits are thin. The H, M, and S markings for the stopwatch and timer have been removed, leaving just the numbers.
  3. Ability for applications to trigger translucency in the navigation and status bars[127]
  4. Ability for applications to use "immersive mode" to keep the navigation and status bars hidden while maintaining user interaction[128]
  5. Action overflow menu buttons are always visible, even on devices with a hardware "Menu" key, which was officially deprecated by Android 4.0[129]
  6. Optimizations for performance on devices with lower specifications, including zRAM support and "low RAM" device API[123]
  7. Wireless printing capability[123]
  8. NFC host card emulation, enabling a device to replace smart cards[123]
  9. WebViews now based on Chromium engine (feature parity with Chrome for Android 30)
  10. Removal of unofficial Flash Player support
  11. Expanded functionality for notification listener services[123]
  12. Public API for developing and managing text messaging clients[130]
  13. New framework for UI transitions
  14. Storage access framework for retrieving content and documents from other sources
  15. Sensor batching, step detector and counter APIs[123]
  16. Settings application now makes it possible to select default text messaging and home (launcher) application
  17. Audio tunneling, audio monitoring and loudness enhancer[131]
  18. Built-in screen recording feature (primarily for developers, as usage of ADB is required)[132]
  19. Native infrared blaster API
  20. Expanded accessibility APIs and system-level closed captioning settings
  21. New experimental runtime virtual machine, ART (not enabled by default)[133]
  22. Bluetooth Message Access Profile (MAP) support[134]
  23. Disabled access to battery statistics by third-party applications[135]
  24. Settings application no longer uses a multi-pane layout on devices with larger screens
  25. Wi-Fi and mobile data activity (TX/RX) indicators are moved to quick settings[136]
  26. Applications' write access to secondary storage (memory cards on devices with internal primary storage) is made possible but restricted to their designated private directories only, while full access to internal primary storage is still allowed through a separate application-level permission.[67][68]


iOS 7[.0.0] changelog:
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
  1. UI
  2. Flat design and move away from skeuomorphism in general (exceptions exist - for a move towards more skeuomorphism, see for example the Countdown with a new skeuomorphic 3D animation of a spinning wheel).
  3. System Helvetica Neue Regular font.
  4. Full Screen apps that make use of the system status bar and navigation bar.
  5. Translucent design in tab bar, navigation bar, status bar, system keyboard, Control Center, and Notification Center (some translucent layers not on iPhone 4, iPad 2 or iPad (3rd generation)).
  6. Opaque design in Alert view, Action Sheet and Share Sheet.
  7. Borderless buttons in general.
  8. Back navigation gesture by swiping from left edge of the screen.
  9. New UI for arranging tab-bar icons.
  10. System-wide dynamic font size, configurable in Settings.
  11. Enhance the viewing experience of non-iPad apps on Retina iPads, remove the 1x and 2x toggle, apps are opened in ’2x’ mode by default on non-Retina iPads.
  12. Home Screen
  13. Search dialog is now accessible on each screen by pulling it down.
  14. "New" banner on newly installed apps have been replaced with blue dots.
  15. Brand new icons for built-in apps.
  16. Newsstand is now a dedicated app instead of a folder.
  17. Control Center
  18. A unified screen to quickly access toggles and controls for system settings and services, and for using AirDrop and AirPlay.
  19. System wide, accessible by swiping upward from the bottom of the screen.
  20. Accessible in the lock screen.
  21. Flashlight (device-specific features that come with physical camera) toggle button.
  22. Landscape support.
  23. A grabber in full screen apps.
  24. Mute/silent toggle button in iPad.
  25. CarPlay
  26. Providing iOS control to in-car control systems on some car models by selected vendors from 2014.
  27. Includes Siri integration (eyes-free/hands-free modes), satellite navigation, telephony, music, and iMessage integration.
  28. AirDrop P5, P5C, P5S, T5, S4, M1
  29. Integrates Apple's ad-hoc Wi-Fi sharing feature AirDrop (iPhone 5 and later, iPad (4th generation) and later, and iPad Mini (1st generation) and later).
  30. Alert view, for receive invitation from other devices, option to accept/cancel.
  31. Options to set discoverable: Off/Contacts only/Everyone.
  32. Inter-app Audio
  33. Register audio streams to share with other apps.
  34. Provides for MIDI control of audio rendering, remotely launching other registered Inter-App Audio apps.
  35. Notification Center
  36. Accessible in the lock screen.
  37. Today tab, for previewing the events calendar, stocks, and tomorrows events; provides traffic info on frequently visited places.
  38. Missed filter: can filter list to see notifications that occurred when phone was not actively in use.
  39. Bounces when swiped down quickly.
  40. Folders
  41. Unlimited number of apps via folder subpages.
  42. Newsstand app can now be moved inside any folder.
  43. Transparent background.
  44. Folders change color when apps are downloading and clock-like animated progress graphic is superimposed over folders that have actively downloading apps.
  45. Alert
  46. A countdown for snooze.
  47. Calculator
  48. New feedback when pressing a key.
  49. Toggle landscape mode button.
  50. Spotlight
  51. Accessible on every page of the Home screen by swiping downward from anywhere.
  52. New animation.
  53. Multitasking
  54. Redesigned switcher, with horizontal scrolling for previewing all running apps, and swipe upward gesture to stop any running apps.
  55. Can close multiple apps simultaneously by swiping with multiple fingers.
  56. Landscape switcher.
  57. Smart background app running mode; fetches data based on network connectivity and user habits.
  58. Use apps while the app is updating.
  59. Wallpapers
  60. New wallpapers.
  61. Dynamic wallpapers.P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5, S2, S3, S4, M1
  62. Gyroscope-responsive parallax wallpaper effect, based on user's movement.P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5, S2, S3, S4, M1
  63. Weather
  64. Dynamic animation for different weathers (iPhone 4S and later and iPod Touch (5th generation)).P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5
  65. Shows sunrise/sunset humidity, chance of precipitation, and wind speed.
  66. Can see multiple locations simultaneously when the menu icon is selected.
  67. Can select GPS icon at bottom to immediately see weather for current location.
  68. Phone
  69. Block list.
  70. Contact pictures on Favorites.
  71. Transparency in the number pad button when pressing.
  72. Phone History and Voicemail Info options allow one to return the call in multiple ways including call back, FaceTime and Messaging.
  73. Contacts
  74. New fields in Contacts: "Add Social Profile", and "Add Instant Message".
  75. "Chat", "FaceTime", "Mail" buttons next to the contact information; no longer need to scroll down to the bottom.
  76. Send contacts through AirDrop.
  77. FaceTime
  78. FaceTime Audio.
  79. Block list.
  80. A dedicated app on the iPhone, like the previous version on iPod Touch and iPad.
  81. Messages
  82. Long SMS.
  83. Block list.
  84. No longer have to scroll to the top to access "Call", "FaceTime", and "Info".
  85. Contact pictures in group chats.
  86. Ability to see exact time of when each message was sent by dragging conversation bubbles to the left.
  87. Event and address detection in the message context, tap to open in Calendar and Maps.
  88. A contact with a nickname will appear in Messages under the nickname, rather than the full name.
  89. New animation when compressing video to be shared.
  90. Safari
  91. Full screen browsing, the previous version only support in iPhone landscape mode.
  92. Unified text field for both URL and search.
  93. Bookmarked website thumbnail icons appear when text field is activated.
  94. Top-hit, Google suggest, Bookmarks, and History appear on the unified text field while typing.
  95. Preview tabs on iPhone and iPod Touch are no longer limited to 8.
  96. Preview tabs use new 3D vertical animation for previewing the opened tabs; long press to edit positions, swipe to remove.
  97. Reading List shows website thumbnails on the right.
  98. Scrolls articles one-by-one vertically from Reading List, as per OS X Mavericks.
  99. Swipe gestures for back/previous history, as per OS X.
  100. Parental controls.
  101. Private button: enables "Do not track me." feature per website within the app. Previously, configuration appeared in Settings for every website.
  102. Recent links: a reading list of all user's friends on Facebook or Twitter post.
  103. Reading List button: new round glasses icon pays tribute to Steve Jobs.
  104. The .com button removed and replaced with a simple period button. The .com, .net, and .org domain extensions can be accessed by holding down on the button.
  105. Bookmarks/Reading List/Shared Links tabs re-ordered/slightly tweaked.
  106. New bolder loading bar, private browsing UI tweaks and tab/bookmark changes on the iPad .
  107. iCloud
  108. Photo Stream video support, and more than one contributor per photo stream.
  109. Notification Sync across different iCloud devices.
  110. Maps
  111. Automatic Day/Night Mode that responds to ambient light and current time to switch between day and night color schemes.
  112. Turn-by-turn walking directions, with estimated time.
  113. Maps bookmarks syncing.
  114. Receives notification data sent from the new Maps app in OS X Mavericks (version 10.9).
  115. A live compass at the right top corner.
  116. Clock
  117. App icon reflects the live time.
  118. Timer shows in the lock screen.
  119. City shows how many hours ahead/behind from your current location.
  120. Music
  121. New iTunes Radio service.
  122. Scrub along the song to get to a certain part directly from the lock screen.
  123. Download full albums from iCloud from iTunes Match.
  124. Tapping a song in the Now-Playing screen allows users to rate.
  125. Cover Flow: Instead of swiping though individual albums, one can now swipe through multiple albums.
  126. Reintroduced on-screen lyrics for iPads (this feature was absent in iOS 5 and iOS 6).
  127. iTunes Radio
  128. Slider/discovery feature.
  129. App Store
  130. Automatic app updates: switch to enable/disable in Settings, under iTunes, App Store.
  131. New catalogues for kids based on their age.
  132. Genius tab replaced with "Apps Near Me" tab for app recommendations based on user's location.
  133. Volume purchase.
  134. Search tab redesigned, the number of results appears on the right of the search field.
  135. Circular download progress animation during downloading/updating in Home Screen.
  136. Add to wish list.
  137. It is now possible to download older versions of apps (the last compatible version supported by the device legacy firmware).
  138. iTunes
  139. Smart download of TV episodes.
  140. Photos
  141. Albums are organized by Places, Moments, and Years, using the EXIF data as the base of the collection.
  142. Share Sheet shares photos to iCloud, social networks, and AirDrop (if available).
  143. New default album "Panorama Photos".
  144. Camera
  145. Control redesign: swipe horizontally to select the still images, videos, square photos, and Panorama modes (if available).
  146. Live image filters. P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5
  147. SDK for 60 FPS video recording.
  148. Pinch to zoom while video recording.
  149. Redeem iTunes gift card using front camera.
  150. Panorama reduces when battery is low.[clarification needed]
  151. Slow motion video recording at 120 frames per second.P5S
  152. Burst mode.P5S
  153. High-dynamic-range imaging (HDR) for iPad.
  154. Calendar
  155. New layout for Calendar list view on the iPhone.
  156. Years view.
  157. Week view.
  158. Integration with Mail.
  159. Integration with Maps, users are notified with transit information when entering places information.
  160. Can now hide or show declined events.
  161. Will support custom calendar colors.
  162. All Day toggle on the Add Event Screen instead of buried in the Select Time control.
  163. Can snooze or View Event when an Event Reminder appears.
  164. Can set up a second alert time for an event.
  165. Can change Busy/Free Status.
  166. Selecting the name of the calendar month shows the monthly calendar.
  167. Game Center
  168. Secure game scores.
  169. Authenticated players.
  170. Turn-based game modes.
  171. Ranking-style leader boards.
  172. Compass
  173. Inclinometer.
  174. Mail
  175. View PDF annotation.
  176. New smart mailboxes.
  177. Improved Mail search.
  178. Hotmail is now Outlook when adding an account, using new Outlook icon.
  179. Flagged, Unread, To or CC, Attachments, All drafts, All sent, All Trash smart mailboxes.
  180. Shake to Undo to un-archive something.
  181. When emailing a passbook pass, it appears as a pass.
  182. New animation when compressing video to be shared.
  183. New animation when moving mail into a folder.
  184. When selecting a target folder while moving an email, an iconic image of the email above the folder selector appears.
  185. Have the ability to move an email to Junk folder when flagging.
  186. New Print option available when Reply option is selected.
  187. Notes
  188. New design, mostly white.
  189. No longer change fonts in Notes.
  190. Can AirDrop notes.
  191. Settings
  192. Per app cellular data usage permission.
  193. Per app using microphone privacy permission.
  194. Per app using camera privacy permission.
  195. Password required to reset networking and contents.
  196. Accessibility
  197. Head movement detection for different gestures.
  198. China features
  199. Tencent Weibo social network integration.
  200. Chinese-English bilingual dictionary.
  201. Improved Chinese input including T9 keyboard for pinyin (Added in Beta 4), and handwriting recognition for multiple Chinese characters.
  202. Siri
  203. Updated voices, and a new male voice (in select regions/languages). English (US), French, and German will be available with the launch of iOS 7 (additional languages will be added over time).
  204. Controls certain system settings, such as turning on/off Bluetooth, and changing display brightness.
  205. Search from Wikipedia and Bing search engines.
  206. Post to Sina Weibo.
  207. Search tweets on Twitter.
  208. Option to open MLB scores in the MLB.com At Bat app.
  209. Navigation, access and voice are more natural.
  210. Reminders
  211. Geofencing.
  212. Ability to create repeating reminders has been removed.
  213. Passbook
  214. Scan and recognize barcodes/QR codes.
  215. Add gift cards as a folder.
  216. Find My iPhone
  217. Activation Lock: re-activation with iCloud account if the device have been wiped remotely using Find My iPhone service, to prevent unauthorized usage of the lost device.
  218. Password required to disable.
  219. Enterprise
  220. Enterprise single sign-on.
  221. Per app VPN.
  222. Managed app config, for more efficiently deploying and managing of iPhones and iPads.
  223. Accessories
  224. Unauthorized Lightning cables are blocked and can no longer be used.[93]
  225. Set up and configure Wi-Fi accessories, such as AirPlay speakers.
  226. iBeacons, a new class of Bluetooth LE low-powered, low-cost transmitters that can notify devices of other nearby devices/services.
  227. Bluetooth LE profiles; including time, notifications, keyboards, and stereo sound.
  228. MFi game controllers.
  229. Screenshot
  230. No longer included in the Assistive Touch, they appear on the layer of the image.
  231. Trusted Devices
  232. User is warned when plugging their iOS device into their Mac/PC, "Trust the currently connected computer? Trusting this computer will allow it to have full access to your device and all of its data."
  233. Voice Memo
  234. New design.
  235. Save to iCloud.
  236. Share using AirDrop.
  237. Status bar
  238. Translucent design.
  239. 1xRTT icon on CDMA iPhones changed from "o" icon to "1x" icon.
  240. GPRS icon on GSM iPhones changed from "o" icon to "GPRS" icon.
  241. Dots representations for cellular signal strength.
  242. Icon size slightly increased for better readability on the lock screen.
  243. Lock screen
  244. Charging the battery: rather than battery image on the lock screen, x% charged briefly appears under the clock, then reverts to the date.
  245. Access to Notification Center and Control Center.
  246. When playing music, the lock screen will now display the time.
  247. iPad has Camera control on the lock screen, like the previous version on iPhone and iPod Touch.
  248. Timer counting down is shown when the device is locked.
  249. Scrubbing bar is now displayed on the lock screen.
  250. Wi-Fi
  251. New Wi-Fi diagnostics mode.
  252. Wi-Fi Hotspot 2.0.
  253. Other
  254. New first-time setup menus.
  255. Add Passcode Lock during Setup Assistant.
  256. Vimeo and Flickr social network integrations.
  257. Italian, Korean, and Dutch dictionaries.
  258. New fade animation when pressing the power button.
  259. New Tamil keyboard.
  260. New ringtones and system sounds.



(You can remove 48 of these as they are category headings for changes. Yeah, they have that many changes.)

Also note that list isn't even close to exhaustive as it doesn't list developer features like frameworks and APIs that were added whereas the KitKat change log does list APIs and frameworks. Apple adds thousands of new APIs each year with excellent documentation to go along with it.

 
And here is 7.1, that measly point update we just had:
 
  1. CarPlayP5 P5C P5S
  2. iOS experience designed for the car (iPhone 5 and later).
  3. Works by connecting a Lightning enabled iPhone to a CarPlay enabled vehicle.
  4. Supports Phone, Messages, Maps, and audio apps (inc. Music and third-party).
  5.  
  6.  
  7. Siri (except P4 P4C S2 S2C)
  8. Manually control when Siri listens by holding down the Home button while you speak, then releasing it when you're finished.
  9. New, more natural sounding male and female voices for Chinese, UK English, Australian English, and Japanese.
  10.  
  11.  
  12. iTunes Radio
  13. Search field above Featured Stations to create stations based on Artist or Song.
  14. Buy albums directly from the Now Playing screen.
  15. Accessibility
  16. Bold font option now includes the keyboard, calculator, and many icon glyphs.
  17. Reduce Motion option now includes Weather, Messages, and multitasking UI animations.
  18. New options to display button shapes, darken app colors, and reduce white point.
  19. Calendar
  20. Option to display event list with the month view.
  21. Country specific holidays automatically added for many countries.
  22. List view has been redesigned.
  23. UI
  24. Camera app has a new "HDR Auto" feature.P5S
  25. Photos & Camera tab in iOS Settings has a new "Upload Burst Photos" option.
  26. You can disable Parallax effect independently of other animations when setting up wallpaper.
  27. Notification Center now displays "No Notifications" and "No Missed Notifications" for the "All" and "Missed" sections respectively when there are no notifications.
  28. Caller ID photos: no longer full screen, instead small circle portrait for incoming/outgoing calls.[94]
  29. New Yahoo logo, in both Notification Center and the Weather app.
  30. A new dialogue "Touch ID requires your passcode when iPhone restarts" when restarting.P5S
  31. New iPad wallpapers.
  32. "Touch ID and Passcode" has been moved-up to the main menu in Settings.
  33. Animations and transitions are noticeably faster.
  34. Keyboard has new Shift/Backspace key highlights.
  35. Control Center has a new "spring" animation upon opening.
  36. Control Center sliders — volume and brightness — have momentum.
  37. Wi-Fi toggle in Control Center now black when Wi-Fi not available (greyed-out in Settings)
  38. Icons for Phone, Messages and FaceTime apps have less vibrant colors.
  39. Music app: Albums now in descending order when browsing by Artist.
  40. Numerous changes that make iOS 7 whole, consistent.
  41. The Phone app has a new-look dialer.
  42. The slide-to-power-off UI has been redesigned.
  43. Bug Fixes/Improvements
  44. Touch ID fingerprint recognition is improved.
  45. Improved performance.P4
  46. Fixes a home screen crash bug.
  47. Fixes display of Mail unread badge for numbers greater than 10,000.
  48. iCloud Keychain support in additional countries.
  49. FaceTime call notifications, automatically clear when call answered on another device.
  50. iBeacon improvements.[95]
  51. Patches 41 security exploits, including those used by the Evasi0n 7 jailbreak.[96]

(And you can minus 7 of the items from this list for the previously stated reason.)

So even that piddly iOS 7.1 point update kills Android 4.4 which you claim is a major release. That just makes it sadder in my opinion.


PS: Thank you for having me look this up because I didn't realize the disparity between iOS and Android updates were as vast but you've inadvertently shown everyone here the truth.

 

Thank you for posting the changelogs.

 

I went through the list of changes for iOS 7 in detail and marked all the bullets that were section headings (48 as you said before), non-functional design changes (18), duplications under separate headings (2), descriptions of functionality (14), and updates to system apps that would come through the Play Store on Android (103).  This left an actual changelog of 75 items, which I will reproduce here:

 

Full Screen apps that make use of the system status bar and navigation bar.
Back navigation gesture by swiping from left edge of the screen.
New UI for arranging tab-bar icons.
System-wide dynamic font size, configurable in Settings.
Enhance the viewing experience of non-iPad apps on Retina iPads, remove the 1x and 2x toggle, apps are opened in ’2x’ mode by default on non-Retina iPads.
Newsstand is now a dedicated app instead of a folder.
A unified screen to quickly access toggles and controls for system settings and services, and for using AirDrop and AirPlay.
Providing iOS control to in-car control systems on some car models by selected vendors from 2014.
Integrates Apple's ad-hoc Wi-Fi sharing feature AirDrop (iPhone 5 and later, iPad (4th generation) and later, and iPad Mini (1st generation) and later).
Register audio streams to share with other apps.
Provides for MIDI control of audio rendering, remotely launching other registered Inter-App Audio apps.
Notification Center accessible in the lock screen.
Today tab, for previewing the events calendar, stocks, and tomorrows events; provides traffic info on frequently visited places.
Missed filter: can filter list to see notifications that occurred when phone was not actively in use.
Unlimited number of apps via folder subpages.
Newsstand app can now be moved inside any folder.
Folders change color when apps are downloading and clock-like animated progress graphic is superimposed over folders that have actively downloading apps.
A countdown for snooze.
New feedback when pressing a key.
Toggle landscape mode button.
Redesigned switcher, with horizontal scrolling for previewing all running apps, and swipe upward gesture to stop any running apps.
Smart background app running mode; fetches data based on network connectivity and user habits.
Use apps while the app is updating.
Dynamic wallpapers.P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5, S2, S3, S4, M1
Gyroscope-responsive parallax wallpaper effect, based on user's movement.P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5, S2, S3, S4, M1
Weather shows sunrise/sunset humidity, chance of precipitation, and wind speed.
Block list.
Contact pictures on Favorites.
Phone History and Voicemail Info options allow one to return the call in multiple ways including call back, FaceTime and Messaging.
New fields in Contacts: "Add Social Profile", and "Add Instant Message".
"Chat", "FaceTime", "Mail" buttons next to the contact information; no longer need to scroll down to the bottom.
Send contacts through AirDrop.
App icon reflects the live time.
Timer shows in the lock screen.
City shows how many hours ahead/behind from your current location.
Control redesign: swipe horizontally to select the still images, videos, square photos, and Panorama modes (if available).
Live image filters. P4S, P5, P5C, P5S, T5
SDK for 60 FPS video recording.
Pinch to zoom while video recording.
Redeem iTunes gift card using front camera.
Panorama reduces when battery is low.[clarification needed]
Slow motion video recording at 120 frames per second.P5S
Burst mode.P5S
High-dynamic-range imaging (HDR) for iPad.
Inclinometer.
Per app cellular data usage permission.
Per app using microphone privacy permission.
Per app using camera privacy permission.
Password required to reset networking and contents.
Head movement detection for different gestures.
Tencent Weibo social network integration.
Enterprise single sign-on.
Per app VPN.
Managed app config, for more efficiently deploying and managing of iPhones and iPads.
Unauthorized Lightning cables are blocked and can no longer be used.[93]
Set up and configure Wi-Fi accessories, such as AirPlay speakers.
iBeacons, a new class of Bluetooth LE low-powered, low-cost transmitters that can notify devices of other nearby devices/services.
Bluetooth LE profiles; including time, notifications, keyboards, and stereo sound.
MFi game controllers.
Screenshots no longer included in the Assistive Touch, they appear on the layer of the image.
User is warned when plugging their iOS device into their Mac/PC, "Trust the currently connected computer? Trusting this computer will allow it to have full access to your device and all of its data."
Save to iCloud.
Share using AirDrop.
Charging the battery: rather than battery image on the lock screen, x% charged briefly appears under the clock, then reverts to the date.
When playing music, the lock screen will now display the time.
iPad has Camera control on the lock screen, like the previous version on iPhone and iPod Touch.
Timer counting down is shown when the device is locked.
Scrubbing bar is now displayed on the lock screen.
New Wi-Fi diagnostics mode.
Wi-Fi Hotspot 2.0.
New first-time setup menus.
Add Passcode Lock during Setup Assistant.
Vimeo and Flickr social network integrations.
New ringtones and system sounds.

 

The changelog you listed for KitKat can be reduced by 3 for non-functional design changes, but is also incomplete.  It lists none of the changes to the dialer, email client, lockscreen, download manager, location settings, camera, and emoji.  It also excludes a lot of the low level system updates, although I think that's fair from a comparison standpoint since the iOS changelog only lists a few of them as well.

 

The iOS 7 changelog would still be longer I suspect, but more like 1.5 times longer rather than 10 times as the "full" changelog implied.

post #71 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

Thank you for posting the changelogs.

I went through the list of changes for iOS 7 in detail and marked all the bullets that were section headings (48 as you said before), non-functional design changes (18), duplications under separate headings (2), descriptions of functionality (14), and updates to system apps that would come through the Play Store on Android (103).  This left an actual changelog of 75 items, which I will reproduce here:

[…]

The changelog you listed for KitKat can be reduced by 3 for non-functional design changes, but is also incomplete.  It lists none of the changes to the dialer, email client, lockscreen, download manager, location settings, camera, and emoji.  It also excludes a lot of the low level system updates, although I think that's fair from a comparison standpoint since the iOS changelog only lists a few of them as well.

The iOS 7 changelog would still be longer I suspect, but more like 1.5 times longer rather than 10 times as the "full" changelog implied.

Did you also exclude all the frameworks and Apis listed for KitKat -or- all the frameworks and APIs listed for iOS 7.0 to balance the results?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #72 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Did you also exclude all the frameworks and Apis listed for KitKat -or- all the frameworks and APIs listed for iOS 7.0 to balance the results?

 

No I didn't exclude those.  From the KitKat list I see 5 bullets that say API and 2 that say framework.  I'm not familiar with programming, so I'm not sure if any others fall into that category.  None of the remaining bullets on the iOS changelog use the terms API or framework.

post #73 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

No I didn't exclude those.  From the KitKat list I see 5 bullets that say API and 2 that say framework.  I'm not familiar with programming, so I'm not sure if any others fall into that category.  None of the remaining bullets on the iOS changelog use the terms API or framework.

Right, but I included a link in my original post to their developer link detailing some of the major ones. I think there are at least a dozen new frameworks and thousands of new APIs for iOS each year.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #74 of 82

When your phone doesn't get the new features in an OS update, who cares? Apple only gives the neat new features to the latest phones. So, if I still had my iPhone 4, I'd still not have the panoramic camera, the parallax screen effect, yada, yada, yada... The only thing I got upgrading from iOS 6 to 7 was an uglier UI.

post #75 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruel24 View Post

When your phone doesn't get the new features in an OS update, who cares? Apple only gives the neat new features to the latest phones. So, if I still had my iPhone 4, I'd still not have the panoramic camera, the parallax screen effect, yada, yada, yada... The only thing I got upgrading from iOS 6 to 7 was an uglier UI.

Features aren't the only thing you would miss out on. Developers will update their apps so that they only work with the new O, you wouldn't have access to a large number of apps.
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #76 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post


Actually percent change is the only way to compare growth rates. In other words you misused the word faster in your comparison of the growth. KitKat is changing more rapidly but controlling less market share. iOS 7 is adding more market share but changing more slowly.

 

 

But what matters, in terms of where the body of users resides, which is important to developers and to security, is the overall percentage using the latest OS version, not the relative growth of that percentage. Please tell me you comprehend this.

I don't care about what the ignorant masses perceive as truth. I'm concerned with the facts on the ground.
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I don't care about what the ignorant masses perceive as truth. I'm concerned with the facts on the ground.
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post #77 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruel24 View Post
 

When your phone doesn't get the new features in an OS update, who cares? Apple only gives the neat new features to the latest phones. So, if I still had my iPhone 4, I'd still not have the panoramic camera, the parallax screen effect, yada, yada, yada... The only thing I got upgrading from iOS 6 to 7 was an uglier UI.

The only thing we get from you is your whiny post.

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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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post #78 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Features aren't the only thing you would miss out on. Developers will update their apps so that they only work with the new O, you wouldn't have access to a large number of apps.

maybe apple should never update their products. Would that make the winers happy? Lets stay in 2010 forever!! better yet, lets stay in1995 and stick with MacOS7. That way nothing will ever change.:rolleyes:

post #79 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post


Anyone who tells me that they don't know people who hate iOS7 is lying. I'm just trying to find out what exactly it is that he's lying about.

yup, so many hate iOS7 that apple just can't sell any phones, right? It has really disrupted their position in the market, right?

post #80 of 82

My point is that's not a problem on Android. Developers make their products work on the most popular OS releases. The thing about Android is, that when the new OS comes to your phone, you get all of the features. Admittedly, if you buy a low end phone, you probably aren't going to see updates. But, then again, few Android updates are all that moving. Kit Kat is just a marginal improvement from 4.3 Jelly Bean, and its major change is moving from Dalvik to Art for runtime execution. However, since Art is in its infancy, it's not fully implemented in the software community. Other than that, there are only small improvements in many things here and there that are inconsequential to the user, who has no trouble getting apps for his older version of Jelly Bean. Many of the parts of the OS that relate to Google are now updated via the Play Store independent of the OS itself, nullifying, somewhat, the lag of carrier approval and OEM hardware support of upgrades. With Samsung's agreement with Google, things should improve further in future phones.

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