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Microsoft hopes to counter Apple with AI-driven 'invisible user interfaces' on future devices - Page 2

post #41 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post
 

I wonder if they will ever give Siri a face?

 

Eventually they should. What better way to interact with the user than also with emotions? I think the best way Apple could do it is by using emoticons. It's so simple that it fits Apple perfectly. People use them a lot, and they are universal. :-)

 

Apple certainly needs to make their heuristics and data detecting systems much better.  At a glance information like in Google Now is the future. There is still a lot to do in this department, so I'm sure they'll be part of the innovators on that.

 

Cortana... I find her voice aggressive, I don't know if it's only the recordings in the videos that show it that do that.

post #42 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

My sentiments, too. For how many decades have nerds drooled over smart fridges?
On an iMore podcast once Rene Ritchie was talking about sensors and all the potentials (one example he gave was your TV automatically changing to a specific channel at a specific time on a certain night based on prior viewing habits) and it actually was freaking me out. Basically in his sensor driven universe you'd never be able to switch off or disconnect. It reminded me of a mother overly fussing with a sick child when the child just wants to be left alone to sleep. In the fridge example I gave, what if I'm emptying out my fridge because I'm going on vacation, or I stopped buying something because I got sick of it? Then I don't want my smart fridge to re-order and send me this item. At what point do people just say "enough!" and completely switch off?
post #43 of 84

Do it and release it!

post #44 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Oh dear… 

 

Cortana is just Clippy with breasts, isn’t it?


Nope. They are totally different

post #45 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

LOL. Is that you, Peter Bright? And did you touch yourself when you said that?

No it's me knowitall.
And now you mention it, this is an excellent piece on MS: http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/04/build-2014-a-very-different-microsoft-takes-aim-at-the-future/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+arstechnica%2Findex+(Ars+Technica+-+All+content)
Edited by knowitall - 4/8/14 at 11:59am
post #46 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emes View Post


Umm...it is true
I highly doubt it.
I expect it to be vaporware.
A real AI (one that truly passes the Turing test) isn't impossible of course but I don't expect it yet, certainly not from MS.
post #47 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by knowitall View Post


I highly doubt it.
I expect it to be vaporware.
A real AI (one that truly passes the Turing test) isn't impossible of course but I don't expect it yet, certainly not from MS.

It's not vaporware. Belfiore demonstrated it in the keynote.

post #48 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by CustomTB View Post

Anyone else thinks it's funny they chose "next"?

Hmmm, I'd say impertinent, rather than funny. Microsoft know 'Next' is the foundation of OSX.
post #49 of 84

va-por-ware

 

People seem to think that AI Winter had something to do with a lack of efforts, but AI Winter is not about results but about the amount of unfounded hype/belief in AI on digital computers. In terms of results, the situation has not substantially changed.

 

That the hype is returning marks the end of the winter-of-AI-hype, not the winter-of-AI.

 

Read a few years worth of New Scientist and you'll see the pattern. Articles with titles like 'seven major new technologies' these days mention 6 that are actually real and one (AI) that are made up with a lot of 'ifs'. AI is not back (it was never there in the first place) but the unfounded belief is back indeed.

 

If this is what Microsoft hopes (they already threw away a large amount of $ in the 80's and 90's) time to sell any stock you have left.

post #50 of 84

A UI that is 'not available for useful interaction' (invisible) is quite characteristic for Microsoft.

post #51 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Now you know how I always enjoy your prickly, provocative point of view, but I just can't let this one pass, not in this context.

HAL is the tragic figure in Clarke's and Kubrick's drama, a victim of bad programming by his duplicitous American handlers. On the one hand he's designed to sense and report on the absolute reality of everything going on around him. On the other hand, he's been told to keep the reason for the mission a secret from the crew.

Unsolvable dilemma! A human could just sweep it under the rug mentally, put it where he puts all his denials. An honest computer will go insane.

A lesson for us all. This is why the New York critics hated the movie. They didn't see the anti-technocratic, anti-American satire, because they lived in the nerve center of imperial America. But Clarke the ex-pat Brit and Kubrick the ex-pat Yank had a lot of fun with this satire throughout the movie, like when Dr. Floyd comments on how "real" the fake ham sandwiches are on the way to visit the monolith on the Moon.

I've often thought that HAL needs his own PR makeover campaign.

And didn't we love him all the more for it?

Who could forget his classic line 'I'm afraid I can't do that', when requested to open the pod bay doors, an issue I'm sure Cortana would have if ever asked to open the iPod bay doors...

(For those Arthur. C. Clarke fans who wish to be amused, ask Siri to open the pod bay doors)

Insanity appears to be the running theme here, with Cortana also having gone insane in the last Halo game. I don't know what positive spin the Microsoft PR department is going to put on THAT when she becomes available.

Privately, I've always found it amusing that, thanks to both the book and the film 2001, of all the years expected to represent the advancement of the human race you couldn't get one better than that one, yet the most notable thing that occurred that year was some idiot flying a bunch of planes into buildings in order to try and make a point.

History, it appears, is not without a sense of irony.
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post #52 of 84

Hmm... from useless to userless without ever quite getting sense in between. Tall order. What MS is actually saying is that they expect to make their interface more non-verbally perceptive than their Engineers and as such, also better than their Tech Support.

 

But MS products already speak for themselves, and in so doing have always demonstrated a significant lack of awareness of subtlety-perception: nor have they ever yet really been able to read the actual human needs of their cliental sufficiently, to be able to appropriately respond.

 

On top of that, do we really want to have machines constantly watching us to create device-shared and thus cloud-based, personal profiles: ones based on the algorithms of MS Programmers, in response to directives from MS consultants and committees, in turn responding to who-knows-what policy-guidelines? ...And if such profiles are acquired by a Govt agency—as they most certainly will—or another third-party, what then? There are negative implications whichever way you go.

 

Not only so, but I for one want to filter information for myself. The web is already becoming an interchange of closed loops based on previous choices: so that what I search doesn't necessarily turn up what you search, which is a real worry.

 

How can a democracy be real, if the information we rely on to be informed is filtered, diced and served by algorithms framed by corporate policies whose bottom-line is always corporate profit?

post #53 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"I speak to Cortana, Cortana responds. I speak back to it, and it understands that we're still in the same conversation. It knows from the first sentence I said what I'm referring to," she said. "That seems like such a small thing for human beings, but it's huge."

 

If someone thinks this is huge, is not

 

 

Reply

 

 

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post #54 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

And didn't we love him all the more for it?

Who could forget his classic line 'I'm afraid I can't do that', when requested to open the pod bay doors, an issue I'm sure Cortana would have if ever asked to open the iPod bay doors...

(For those Arthur. C. Clarke fans who wish to be amused, ask Siri to open the pod bay doors)

Insanity appears to be the running theme here, with Cortana also having gone insane in the last Halo game. I don't know what positive spin the Microsoft PR department is going to put on THAT when she becomes available.

Privately, I've always found it amusing that, thanks to both the book and the film 2001, of all the years expected to represent the advancement of the human race you couldn't get one better than that one, yet the most notable thing that occurred that year was some idiot flying a bunch of planes into buildings in order to try and make a point.

History, it appears, is not without a sense of irony.

Hmm, I should have known I was lecturing the professor. True about that irony. There's another good one I can't think of right now.

Anyway, I happened to find out the inventor of the paper clip today, none other than social Darwinist Herbert Spencer..

Clippy's godfather. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-26940646
post #55 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Anyway, I happened to find out the inventor of the paper clip today, none other than social Darwinist Herbert Spencer..

Clippy's godfather. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-26940646


A gentleman with facial hair like this is always going to be responsible for inventing some form or other of clip...
 

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post #56 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post
 

MS can talk all they like. 

 

Meanwhile their entire mobile strategy barely has any traction in the market. 

Maybe they will release Cortana as an iPhone app?

post #57 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

Insanity appears to be the running theme here, with Cortana also having gone insane in the last Halo game. I don't know what positive spin the Microsoft PR department is going to put on THAT when she becomes available.

Haha, gold.

post #58 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


On an iMore podcast once Rene Ritchie was talking about sensors and all the potentials (one example he gave was your TV automatically changing to a specific channel at a specific time on a certain night based on prior viewing habits) and it actually was freaking me out. Basically in his sensor driven universe you'd never be able to switch off or disconnect. It reminded me of a mother overly fussing with a sick child when the child just wants to be left alone to sleep. In the fridge example I gave, what if I'm emptying out my fridge because I'm going on vacation, or I stopped buying something because I got sick of it? Then I don't want my smart fridge to re-order and send me this item. At what point do people just say "enough!" and completely switch off?

Quite! It's the same with recommendations and personalised everything. Being given exactly what you want-how do you know what you want? You may want something else for a change! There's just too much bloody information. 

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post #59 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post


And didn't we love him all the more for it?

Who could forget his classic line 'I'm afraid I can't do that', when requested to open the pod bay doors, an issue I'm sure Cortana would have if ever asked to open the iPod bay doors...

(For those Arthur. C. Clarke fans who wish to be amused, ask Siri to open the pod bay doors)

Insanity appears to be the running theme here, with Cortana also having gone insane in the last Halo game. I don't know what positive spin the Microsoft PR department is going to put on THAT when she becomes available.

Privately, I've always found it amusing that, thanks to both the book and the film 2001, of all the years expected to represent the advancement of the human race you couldn't get one better than that one, yet the most notable thing that occurred that year was some idiot flying a bunch of planes into buildings in order to try and make a point.

History, it appears, is not without a sense of irony.

Yes. Most of us can't predict the future, save prophets and a hallowed few(see Steve Jobs). 

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post #60 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

OMG, are they nuts, again M$ thinks they know what is best again and will attempt to make product which seem to know what you want. Really, how many people you know, know what they want at any given time of the day. Most people walk around in a fog and ignorant bliss. Somehow M$ is going o make sense of a human and predict what they want to do and just make it happen before they type, talk or gesture.

I hope MS will be able to predict me telling them to F themselves as I give them the finger.
post #61 of 84
Microsoft have always been the King of Vaporware
post #62 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"I speak to Cortana, Cortana responds. I speak back to it, and it understands that we're still in the same conversation. It knows from the first sentence I said what I'm referring to," she said. "That seems like such a small thing for human beings, but it's huge."

 

Welcome to the iPhone 4S keynote circa 2011.

 

post #63 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

Yes. Most of us can't predict the future, save prophets and a hallowed few(see Steve Jobs). 

The best way to predict the future is to make it, and that's what SJ did.
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post #64 of 84
Wait, so Cortana is a 12 year old girl? I find the image of her a bit creepy. I'm with the other poster who suggested they leave it up to your imagination.
post #65 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emes View Post
 

It's not vaporware. Belfiore demonstrated it in the keynote.

Ah yes, and what did he demonstrate?

post #66 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Now you know how I always enjoy your prickly, provocative point of view, but I just can't let this one pass, not in this context.

HAL is the tragic figure in Clarke's and Kubrick's drama, a victim of bad programming by his duplicitous American handlers. On the one hand he's designed to sense and report on the absolute reality of everything going on around him. On the other hand, he's been told to keep the reason for the mission a secret from the crew.

Unsolvable dilemma! A human could just sweep it under the rug mentally, put it where he puts all his denials. An honest computer will go insane.

A lesson for us all. This is why the New York critics hated the movie. They didn't see the anti-technocratic, anti-American satire, because they lived in the nerve center of imperial America. But Clarke the ex-pat Brit and Kubrick the ex-pat Yank had a lot of fun with this satire throughout the movie, like when Dr. Floyd comments on how "real" the fake ham sandwiches are on the way to visit the monolith on the Moon.

I've often thought that HAL needs his own PR makeover campaign.

...and is that you John Gruber, because he's the only person in tech that I read that has a better understanding and obsession with Kubrick. 1smoking.gif
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post #67 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

...and is that you John Gruber, because he's the only person in tech that I read that has a better understanding and obsession with Kubrick. 1smoking.gif

All we need is a reference to the Yankees to know for sure lol.gif
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post #68 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


HAL is the tragic figure in Clarke's and Kubrick's drama, a victim of bad programming by his duplicitous American handlers. On the one hand he's designed to sense and report on the absolute reality of everything going on around him. On the other hand, he's been told to keep the reason for the mission a secret from the crew.

Unsolvable dilemma! A human could just sweep it under the rug mentally, put it where he puts all his denials. An honest computer will go insane

HAL had an entirely different problem to solve: how to eliminate uncertainty. He concluded that he had to remove Humans from the equation.
post #69 of 84
Originally Posted by buymymonkey View Post
Wait, so Cortana is a 12 year old girl? I find the image of her a bit creepy.

 

 

Is this what 12 year old girls look like these days? I guess I need to start looking at more 12 year old girls.

 

… 

 

Nope, not gonna correct that this time.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #70 of 84
I read this somewhere, seemed appropriate:

"Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity."
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post #71 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

This is rich, Microsoft, who held on to the command line interface while ridiculing Apple GUI, is lecturing us.
You do know that Microsoft was one of the first Macintosh software developers, right?
post #72 of 84
Let's see !!!!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ezhik View Post

You do know that Microsoft was one of the first Macintosh software developers, right?


Yeah, MSFT invented the Mac !

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post #73 of 84
Originally Posted by Ezhik View Post
You do know that Microsoft was one of the first Macintosh software developers, right?

 

I fail to see how your statement is relevant.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #74 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hydrogen View Post


Yeah, MSFT invented the Mac !

No need to twist my words. It's the truth.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

I fail to see how your statement is relevant.

I was merely correcting another user.

post #75 of 84
Originally Posted by Ezhik View Post

I was merely correcting another user.

 

In what way? He wasn’t wrong, and your post didn’t correct him.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #76 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

In what way? He wasn’t wrong, and your post didn’t correct him.

Well considering that they developed for the original Mac, and then soon released Windows 1.0 implies that they weren't the GUI haters the person I replied to made them out to be.

post #77 of 84
Originally Posted by Ezhik View Post
Well considering that they developed for the original Mac, and then soon released Windows 1.0 implies that they weren't the GUI haters the person I replied to made them out to be.

 

Uh… yeah, they were. It’s called hypocrisy. Like what Samsung is doing right now.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #78 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Uh… yeah, they were. It’s called hypocrisy. Like what Samsung is doing right now.

Erm... No? The world was different in 1984. Back at the start, in a world ruled by the command line people considered the Mac a toy. It wasn't until the 90s that it all finally took hold. Just because Microsoft didn't go all out with their Mac efforts and ditched their own software offerings doesn't mean that they hated the GUI idea.

 

Besides, why are we even arguing? I was just correcting a guy, didn't even state my own opinion on anything.

post #79 of 84
Originally Posted by Ezhik View Post
The world was different in 1984. Back at the start, in a world ruled by the command line people considered the Mac a toy.

 

Good for them. They were wrong. Just like everyone was wrong about the iPhone.

 

Microsoft simultaneously stealing Mac OS privately while insulting it publicly is still hypocrisy. It doesn’t matter that fluorescent colored clothing was popular at the time.

 
Besides, why are we even arguing? I was just correcting a guy,

 

Because you were wrong. How is that not evident to you when we’re five posts into this nonsense?!

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #80 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Good for them. They were wrong. Just like everyone was wrong about the iPhone.

 

Microsoft simultaneously stealing Mac OS privately while insulting it publicly is still hypocrisy. It doesn’t matter that fluorescent colored clothing was popular at the time.

 

Because you were wrong. How is that not evident to you when we’re five posts into this nonsense?!

If we take your iPhone comparison: Windows 1.0 was announced BEFORE the Macintosh (of course, they knew about it), while work on Windows Phone 7, Microsoft's answer to the iPhone, started only in 2009, 2 years after the iPhone came out.

 

They weren't wrong, they just played it safe. You are missing a big point here: Microsoft is a company. Why would they just ditch MS-DOS, which was bringing in a lot of cash. And why would they invoke the Osborne effect by outright stating that Macintosh's GUI is better than MS-DOS?

 

So yeah, I just don't see what I'm wrong in. I said that Microsoft didn't hate the GUI like the first guy I replied to said, and they really didn't, considering their GUI efforts and this little unknown OS called Windows.


Edited by Ezhik - 4/10/14 at 9:56am
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