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Apple 'likely' to launch low-cost iMac soon, Retina MacBook Air still on track for 2014 debut - Page 2

post #41 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

What hardware features? Apple can pick and choose what sort of hardware features to incorporate into their SoC. They can also leave out much that isn't relevant anymore. That frankly is Intels big problem, they spend a lot of transistors on backwards compatibility for features that don't mean much today.

I highly disagree. Compatabikity with all previous x86 software is a huge feature. I can currently run ANY OSX or Windows program on my MBA. If that changes, I'm moving back to Windows (no choice there). I'd love to stay with OSX but if the MBA goes ARM, I'm gone

From your perspective, Intel made a mistake, 'wasting those transistors' on backwards compatibility. Those transistors will keep me buying their product for many years to come (unless ARM can emulate x86 code faster, in real time, than an Intel chip can run in).

I use some software that is over 10 years old. It will never get recompiled.
Edited by iRun262 - 4/10/14 at 7:07pm
post #42 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by iRun262 View Post

I can currently run ANY OSX or Windows program on my MBA. If that changes, I'm moving back to Windows (no choice there). I'd love to stay with OSX but if the MBA goes ARM, I'm gone.

So your only options are an Intel-based MacBook Air or a WinPC? You wouldn't consider an Intel-based MBP?
Edited by SolipsismX - 4/10/14 at 9:29pm

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post #43 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

So your only options are an Intel-based MacBook Air or a WinPC? You wouldn't consider an Intel-based MBP?

Actually, you somehow quoted me yet attributed it to the other person.

I would if I wanted the 13" MBA model. I use the 11" MBA instead because it is so much more portable. That is why I am especially excited about the rumored new 12" (assuming it is Broadwell).
post #44 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Get over it.


Why?

 

Isn't the mini basically a laptop without a screen?

So why not an iMac without a screen?

post #45 of 121
Originally Posted by MacTac View Post

Isn't the mini basically a laptop without a screen?

So why not an iMac without a screen?

 

Because if you can’t comprehend after 18 years of Apple explicitly refusing to make the product you want that they will never make the product you want, you don’t deserve yet another explanation for why no one cares anymore.

post #46 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTac View Post
 


Why?

 

Isn't the mini basically a laptop without a screen?

So why not an iMac without a screen?

 

What is your point? The bottom imac ships with integrated graphics and a slower cpu than the quad minis. Calling it a notebook is pointless. You should be able to outline your desires in terms of performance/features/price. Otherwise you're merely arguing semantics.

post #47 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTac View Post


Why?

Isn't the mini basically a laptop without a screen?
So why not an iMac without a screen?

The Mac mini is your iMac without a screen. Remember that Apple used mostly notebook-grade components for most of the iMac's existence. If you want anything more powerful that is headless queue up for a Mac Pro. I doubt Apple is gong to build a 3rd low-volume, headless desktop PC.

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post #48 of 121
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
The Mac mini is your iMac without a screen.

 

iMac uses desktop chips now while the Mini still uses laptop ones.

 

Unless you mean ‘your’ as in actually his, in which case yes. :lol:

post #49 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by iRun262 View Post

I highly disagree. Compatabikity with all previous x86 software is a huge feature.
For you it is. At work it is important to me also. However at home I don't care. I fact I can think of nothing at the moment that would keep me on Intel. As long as the platform is open and I can run brew as a package manager I'm all set.
Quote:
I can currently run ANY OSX or Windows program on my MBA. If that changes, I'm moving back to Windows (no choice there). I'd love to stay with OSX but if the MBA goes ARM, I'm gone
Then the platform isn't for you. The fact is through smart phones and iPads people have discovered that they don't need i86 compatibility.
Quote:
From your perspective, Intel made a mistake, 'wasting those transistors' on backwards compatibility. Those transistors will keep me buying their product for many years to come (unless ARM can emulate x86 code faster, in real time, than an Intel chip can run in).
It puts Intel In a tough position when it comes to power management and design flexibility. Much of that old functionality could be emulated these days. Just consider all the addressing modes Intel has to support.
Quote:
I use some software that is over 10 years old. It will never get recompiled.

Believe me I understand this completely as I'm in a similar position at work. However you are mistaken to believe that Intel, along with MS can keep thing compatible forever. I've experienced more that a couple of cases where hardware or operating systems upgrades have madesoftware obsolete. That is the software becomes non functional due to upgrades. The reality is you are on borrowed time with this old software. In some cases we have had to replace entire systems because the manufacture refuses to upgrade software, doesn't exist anymore or specific hardware can no longer be purchased.

So don't misunderstand me I understand your issues completely but sometimes you need to bite the bullet. Further not every system Apple makes needs to be built for you and your needs. As it is I see Apple keeping Air and introducing an alternative platform loosely derived from iOS systems.
post #50 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Because if you can’t comprehend after 18 years of Apple explicitly refusing to make the product you want that they will never make the product you want, you don’t deserve yet another explanation for why no one cares anymore.

The problem is the desktop market is in a wreck as it is. As such Apple has two choices really, drop the Mini or try to revamp in a way that spurs sales.

As to caring I'm pretty sure Apple cares about all product sales even if they don't publicly pay attention to those sales. One way Apple can address sales is to merge some of the Minis functionality with an AppleTV like device. However to dismiss the idea of a more general overhaul of the Mini is unfortunate as the new chips release schedules enable all sorts of possibilities for an entirely different Mac platform to replace the Mini.
post #51 of 121

In my case, it is either a refreshed mini or a Windows 8 machine. Poor eyesight. I have no choice. I want OS X and its speech ability. Foolish to purchase an iMac and an extra monitor.

post #52 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

For you it is. At work it is important to me also. However at home I don't care. I fact I can think of nothing at the moment that would keep me on Intel. As long as the platform is open and I can run brew as a package manager I'm all set.

 

Lol...like your need for brew is more mainstream than the need for x86 apps.

post #53 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

Lol...like your need for brew is more mainstream than the need for x86 apps.

For some it might be. I like the ability to install apps like InkScape through home brew instead of using the packages at the InkScape homepage. Granted there aren't a lot of user apps on the HomeBrew site and even fewer GUI based ones but I find HomeBrew to be the most convient to way to keep my machine up to date.

This also highlights why I said the system needs to be open. These days it is easy for people to install alternative software on the Mac. In fact Apple encourages it via XCode and the very high compatibility CLang has with GCC. Without the current ease of installing and running software that we see on current Mac systems an ARM based laptop would be of little value to me. Further I would want to be able to run my own scripts and programs.

In any event I wanted to point out that I86 compatibility isn't the big draw for the consumer market it use to be. It really is a different world. In the commercial world sometimes stupidity still has its day. I still maintain systems supported with DOS based apps. It isn't something I like but I'm not the manager making the decisions in this facility. At home where I do make the decisions it really doesn't matter if a laptop has an ARM based processor or not. Ideally I will get better performance than is seen in my old MBP but that is almost a given these days.
post #54 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


For you it is. At work it is important to me also. However at home I don't care. I fact I can think of nothing at the moment that would keep me on Intel. As long as the platform is open and I can run brew as a package manager I'm all set.
 

I just really really like the nerd factor behind this part of the post.

post #55 of 121

I REALLY want to see a new mini soon, if Apple doesn't come out with a new XServe.  I've got some older servers that need to be replaced, the new Mac "Pro" is completely inappropriate (I don't need dual video cards in a server, I need redundant boot storage, and I don't like that being external.  And a server shaped like a trash can is just stupid.)  An iMac is a great workstation, and I'd love to see lower cost iMacs, spreadsheet jockeys, lawyers, legal secretaries, and medical assistants don't need a lot of power these days.  I really couldn't care less about a retina screen, and thin does diddly for me once you get as thin as the first flat panel iMacs.  But I need new servers, boxes I can stack up in racks in the equipment closet.  Low power consumption is GREAT for servers, it cuts cooling costs.  I'd prefer easier to replace hard drives, hot swappable would be even better.

 

It's getting to the point where I'm going to have to start building Hackintoshes just for the server room, and I really don't want to have to do that.  But Apple doesn't seem to want to give me a choice.

post #56 of 121
I really hate to say this but I see zero chance that XServe will come back. I'm not even sure the coming Mini or its replacement will be suitable for server duty.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkVader View Post

I REALLY want to see a new mini soon, if Apple doesn't come out with a new XServe.  I've got some older servers that need to be replaced, the new Mac "Pro" is completely inappropriate (I don't need dual video cards in a server, I need redundant boot storage, and I don't like that being external.  And a server shaped like a trash can is just stupid.)
I can't imagine the current Mac Pro passing for a server. However I can see a model being slightly revised to make a fairly decent server. You do that by deleting a video card and using that space for an SSD card or even several SSD cards. With an external RAIDed controller it ought to be very functional and low cost.
Quote:
  An iMac is a great workstation, and I'd love to see lower cost iMacs, spreadsheet jockeys, lawyers, legal secretaries, and medical assistants don't need a lot of power these days.  I really couldn't care less about a retina screen, and thin does diddly for me once you get as thin as the first flat panel iMacs.  But I need new servers, boxes I can stack up in racks in the equipment closet.  Low power consumption is GREAT for servers, it cuts cooling costs.  I'd prefer easier to replace hard drives, hot swappable would be even better.
I don't see that happening as an Apple product.
Quote:
It's getting to the point where I'm going to have to start building Hackintoshes just for the server room, and I really don't want to have to do that.  But Apple doesn't seem to want to give me a choice.

Where you can move to BSD or Linux. Write Tim Cook about the need for a more versatile server like product. For the most part I think you are out of luck running Mac OS server into the future. Is see the Mini as a server as a bit oF a joke
post #57 of 121
I wonder what's next for the iMac. It can't get much thinner. It can't get much bigger. They can throw a SSD drive in them to make them a little thinner, but then what?
post #58 of 121
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post
I wonder what's next for the iMac. It can't get much thinner. It can't get much bigger. They can throw a SSD drive in them to make them a little thinner, but then what?

 

Multitouch.

post #59 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I think there are now 5 or 6.

I gotta wonder who is paying whom for all this exposure.

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post #60 of 121
If priced right, I will pick up this lower cost iMac. I would prefer a mini though.
post #61 of 121

Mini bye bye soon.

post #62 of 121
It looks like the desktop Haswell refresh chips are coming May 11th:

http://vr-zone.com/articles/internal-intel-charts-confirm-may-11-release-date-haswell-refresh/76279.html

Those replace the chips currently in the iMacs e.g i7-4770 goes to i7-4790. 100MHz or so clock speed boost. If they intro a lower cost iMac, I'd expect it to have an i3 processor. To replace a mini bundle, it would have to hit $999 at most. That would be pushing it because the current entry is $1299 so dropping $300 would be difficult.

It also means that you can't get a quad-i7 anywhere near $799 but we always have to keep in mind that the mini affects very few people. 150k per quarter out of over 4 million buyers. Buyers have spoken and they want iMacs so adding a lower cost entry point would do more for Apple than keeping the mini going.

The same goes for laptops, they can use a <8W CPU and make a fanless $799 Macbook Air and boost unit sales.

The laptop chips look like they are due June 2nd. They can be shown off at WWDC if the Air is redesigned. OS X could be redesigned too.

I guess they'll be going for another California name:

Yosemite, Hollywood, Elysian, GoldenGate, Santa Monica, Thousand Oaks, Pasadena... lots of names to choose from. Given an aesthetic makeover, perhaps OS X Hollywood would be the most appropriate. Background images of just the Hollywood sign can be tacky but if they get a wide panorama or stylize it, it can look ok:



They used a picture of Marilyn Monroe in their iPad ad for Hollywood:



There are other options if they want to focus on people:

post #63 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

It also means that you can't get a quad-i7 anywhere near $799 but we always have to keep in mind that the mini affects very few people. 150k per quarter out of over 4 million buyers. Buyers have spoken and they want iMacs so adding a lower cost entry point would do more for Apple than keeping the mini going

 

Citation needed.  If this is true why does the mini consistently sell more on Amazon than the iMac?  150 strikes me as low.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Computers-Accessories-Desktop/zgbs/pc/565098

post #64 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

I guess they'll be going for another California name:

Yosemite, Hollywood, Elysian, GoldenGate, Santa Monica, Thousand Oaks, Pasadena... lots of names to choose from. Given an aesthetic makeover, perhaps OS X Hollywood would be the most appropriate. Background images of just the Hollywood sign can be tacky but if they get a wide panorama or stylize it, it can look ok:]

That's what they stated it would be last year: inspirational places in California. My guess is that it's unlikely to be any city or town name unless it's just a coincidence because the inspirational place name also shares the name with incorporated municipal. Mavericks isn't even a place on land so what could the next one be?

MR had a recent article on it. I like Yosemite and Mammoth. I think Pacific and California are too general. qnd Big Sur might be too close in location to Mavericks, meaning, if they are going to use this naming convention for awhile I'd think they'd want to spread it around CA a bit more. Perhaps even do something inland this next time.

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post #65 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


 qnd Big Sur might be too close in location to Mavericks, meaning, if they are going to use this naming convention for awhile I'd think they'd want to spread it around CA a bit more. Perhaps even do something inland this next time.

Big Sur is at least less cliche than some of those others, in the sense that fewer people from outside of California would immediately recognize it as something they've heard of many times in the past.

post #66 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

It looks like the desktop Haswell refresh chips are coming May 11th:

http://vr-zone.com/articles/internal-intel-charts-confirm-may-11-release-date-haswell-refresh/76279.html

Those replace the chips currently in the iMacs e.g i7-4770 goes to i7-4790. 100MHz or so clock speed boost. If they intro a lower cost iMac, I'd expect it to have an i3 processor. To replace a mini bundle, it would have to hit $999 at most. That would be pushing it because the current entry is $1299 so dropping $300 would be difficult.
This Haswell refresh is hardly worth the wait unless they have something they haven't let on about coming. That something would be DDR4. Since all indications are that DDR4 won't be supported in Intels Haswell refresh all I can say is ho hum. Let's face it 100MHz will hardly be noticeable.

As for the iMac, again I believe there is plenty of room for a low cost machine. All one has to do is look at the cost of LCD TVs.
Quote:
It also means that you can't get a quad-i7 anywhere near $799 but we always have to keep in mind that the mini affects very few people. 150k per quarter out of over 4 million buyers. Buyers have spoken and they want iMacs so adding a lower cost entry point would do more for Apple than keeping the mini going.
Actually a quad would be easy with an AMD processor and would perform nicely for a lot of users.

As to the 150K I'm thinking you are high there. At one time it was estimated that over 80% of Apples Mac sales where laptops. That doesn't leave much to split across the iMac, Mac Pro and the Mini.
Quote:

The same goes for laptops, they can use a <8W CPU and make a fanless $799 Macbook Air and boost unit sales.
Possibly but I don't see an 8 watt processor delivering acceptable performance until Broadwell.
Quote:
The laptop chips look like they are due June 2nd. They can be shown off at WWDC if the Air is redesigned. OS X could be redesigned too.
I would suspect that Apple will refresh as soon as possible but that WWDC will focus on new hardware devices. Developers will likely have much that is new to support.
Quote:
I guess they'll be going for another California name:

Yosemite, Hollywood, Elysian, GoldenGate, Santa Monica, Thousand Oaks, Pasadena... lots of names to choose from. Given an aesthetic makeover, perhaps OS X Hollywood would be the most appropriate. Background images of just the Hollywood sign can be tacky but if they get a wide panorama or stylize it, it can look ok:
I always liked Joshua Tree in this context. It could lead to some interesting graphics.
post #67 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


I always liked Joshua Tree in this context. It could lead to some interesting graphics.

And I thought you hated everything related to California:D. I couldn't resist that joke.

post #68 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

Citation needed.  If this is true why does the mini consistently sell more on Amazon than the iMac?  150 strikes me as low.

Apple split out the desktop and laptop numbers in 2012 in their SEC filing and it was 75% laptop, 25% desktop and every filing since, they say the numbers have moved more to portables and they stopped splitting them out. The desktop ASP was $1300, which points to a higher purchase price. Tim Cook reported that the ~2-2.5 month iMac delay in late 2012 caused a 700,000 unit shortfall:

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2013/01/tim-cook-on-the-imac-cannibalization-is-a-huge-opportunity-for-us/
http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2013/01/23Apple-Reports-Record-Results.html

That was when they sold 4.1m Macs vs 5.2m the previous year. This means they should have sold 4.8m Macs, at least 75% of those would be laptops and at least 700k iMacs. This leaves 1.2m - 0.7m = 0.5m to be split between Mac Pro and mini. But, that assumes that they didn't sell any iMacs, which wasn't the case and it assumes desktops still hold 25% but they've been noted to slip further. If you assume the iMac would be 3/2.5 x 700k = 840k, this leaves 360k between mini and Pro.

Computer ownership surveys have put the mini and Pro very close with the mini just out ahead. I would say the Pro is 50-150k and the mini is 150-250k, depending on when in the release schedule we're at. Right now, I'd expect the mini to be at a low level.

The higher sales on Amazon can be accounted for the fact that Amazon buyers would tend towards cheaper options where they can also buy a cheap display. Notice the model is the cheapest one and customers also bought $129 and $157 Asus displays, $109, $150, $170 and $240 Viewsonic, $128 Asus, $190 Dell displays. iMac buyers won't be any better off buying from Amazon and they have to rely on Amazon delivery. I'd buy a Mini from Amazon or even eBay, what's the worst that could happen? An iMac or laptop, I'd buy from Apple direct as I know I'm not going to get screwed on the display like I might with a 3rd party retailer.

The other thing to consider is revenue. Even if the mini is 250k units but selling at $599, that's $150m with 30% gross = $45m gross profit. A $999 iMac might manage to boost revenue as it pushes Mac buyers looking for a quad-i7 to a much higher price, it offers a lower entry price for PC buyers and it pushes mini bundle buyers towards giving Apple money for the display. Maybe a lot of mini buyers just won't buy a Mac but I doubt they'd lose many sales. If they come in with a $799 Macbook Air, that'll more than make up for any losses from the mini.

I don't want to see the mini go particularly but if it doesn't sell well enough, why keep offering it? The future is portable systems and desktops will continue to wind down until they're not worth selling. I'd quite like to see a 13" rMBP with a quad-i7 and Iris Pro around the $1499 mark. The CPU is only $120 more than the entry level $1299, that would be a better option for mini buyers than having to go to a $1999 MBP or $1699 iMac for a quad-i7 processor.
post #69 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post

And I thought you hated everything related to California:D . I couldn't resist that joke.

California is a very interesting place that is unfortunately inhabited by some really bad people. It attracts the worst of society like horse shit attracts flies. If it wasn't for that I'd wouldn't be so negative on the place. Of course that shouldn't dismiss what the good people in the state have done over the years but they really need to clean the place up. A lot of good could be accomplished there with a death penalty and a few judges not embarrassed to use it.

So no I don't hate California at all as a place, I hate what it has become as a state. As far as Apple goes there are plenty of places in California that they could choose from for names. Names that can inspire like Joshua Tree or put a bit of fright into to like Death Valley. Personally I'd rather see them stick with beaches as California has plenty. How about Rincon. Maybe we should start a thread on possible beach names for the next Mac OS rev.
post #70 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

So no I don't hate California at all as a place, I hate what it has become as a state. As far as Apple goes there are plenty of places in California that they could choose from for names. Names that can inspire like Joshua Tree or put a bit of fright into to like Death Valley. Personally I'd rather see them stick with beaches as California has plenty. How about Rincon. Maybe we should start a thread on possible beach names for the next Mac OS rev.

1) Not familiar with Rincon but is it inspirational?

2) If they were going to only do beaches (or beach adjacent places like Mavericks) wouldn't they have mentioned that instead of just saying inspirational places throughout California?

3) Joshua Tree is inspirational but 1) I think the name sounds wrong for a Mac OS X codename, and 2) it's very well known compared to Mavericks so I wonder if Apple will be focusing on less familiar places.

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post #71 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

So no I don't hate California at all as a place, I hate what it has become as a state. 

 

Agreed. The political system is "worst of all worlds" scenario and the massive public employee unions are bankrupting the state. They should never have been allowed to unionize. It's the fault of both Kennedy (Executive Order 10988) in 1962 and Congress in 1978 (Civil Service Reform Act).

 

Even Franklin Roosevelt was against it!

 

The emergence of powerful public-sector unions was by no means inevitable. Prior to the 1950s, as labor lawyer Ida Klaus remarked in 1965, "the subject of labor relations in public employment could not have meant less to more people, both in and out of government." To the extent that people thought about it, most politicians, labor leaders, economists, and judges opposed collective bargaining in the public sector. Even President Franklin Roosevelt, a friend of private-sector unionism, drew a line when it came to government workers: "Meticulous attention," the president insisted in 1937, "should be paid to the special relations and obligations of public servants to the public itself and to the Government....The process of collective bargaining, as usually understood, cannot be transplanted into the public service." The reason? F.D.R. believed that "[a] strike of public employees manifests nothing less than an intent on their part to obstruct the operations of government until their demands are satisfied. Such action looking toward the paralysis of government by those who have sworn to support it is unthinkable and intolerable." Roosevelt was hardly alone in holding these views, even among the champions of organized labor. Indeed, the first president of the AFL-CIO, George Meany, believed it was "impossible to bargain collectively with the government."

 

Source: http://www.nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-trouble-with-public-sector-unions

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post #72 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

A lot of good could be accomplished there with a death penalty and a few judges not embarrassed to use it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

They should never have been allowed to unionize. 

 

 

Wow!

post #73 of 121
Quote:
I don't want to see the mini go particularly but if it doesn't sell well enough, why keep offering it? The future is portable systems and desktops will continue to wind down until they're not worth selling. I'd quite like to see a 13" rMBP with a quad-i7 and Iris Pro around the $1499 mark. The CPU is only $120 more than the entry level $1299, that would be a better option for mini buyers than having to go to a $1999 MBP or $1699 iMac for a quad-i7 processor.

I don't disagree with much of what you have said in your entire message but I'm not certain I agree with this entirely. First off if anybody really thinks that desktops are doing well sales wise they have to be nuts. The demand for desktops has fallen substantially. In Apples world they likely have gone past 80% laptops though I'm kinda hoping for reinvigorated Mac Pro sales shifting that some. All one has to do is to walk into any store selling computers and see that desktops, if they even exist are relegated to a corner in the store. This is a fact in Apples stores too.

Now all of that being said why do I have an issue with what you have said above? The thing here is that I don't see desktops going away completely but rather see them morphing into something different. In this regards I still have this idea that AppleTV might very well be the desktop in Apples future. Of course a vastly more capable machine than the current AppleTV and maybe not easily recognizable as an Apple TV. The idea here is a low cost box that can do double triple or even more duty in a persons home.

Some of the rumors about the next AppleTV containing new features including things like an integrated Ethernet hub might be indicating that Apple is thinking the same way. The big problem here is iOS which sucks as a replacement OS for a Mac. In any event what I'm trying to express here is the idea that the Mini will be replaced with something different. Maybe it won't derive from the iOS family but I can see Apple trying to find ways to incorporate more value into the box to help users justify the purchase.

The other side of the coin here is that Apple needs a low cost box to run Mac OS server on. The Mac Pro certainly isn't suitable and neither is the iMac.

The other possibility is that Apple is simply waiting for a Broadwell based SoC to make the Mini even smaller, possibly passively cooled. For some uses a Mini can't be too small. I follow a lot of the developments in the ARM world where things like Raspberry PI are now very low end but complete computer systems. I can see a whole Mini replacement coming that isn't much bigger. Small and low power could actually be a factor in stimulating sales as some could actually pay for the new machine just by savings gained from reduced electricity use.

Now people may laugh at the idea of Apple reducing the size of the Mini significantly but one only needs to look at where the industry is going? Intel is planning on SoC Broadwell variants, memory modules are going 3D and flash based SSDs are good enough for many these days. I can see a Mini the size of an iPhone 6, maybe an inch and a half thick.
post #74 of 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

I don't disagree with much of what you have said in your entire message but I'm not certain I agree with this entirely. First off if anybody really thinks that desktops are doing well sales wise they have to be nuts. The demand for desktops has fallen substantially. In Apples world they likely have gone past 80% laptops though I'm kinda hoping for reinvigorated Mac Pro sales shifting that some. All one has to do is to walk into any store selling computers and see that desktops, if they even exist are relegated to a corner in the store. This is a fact in Apples stores too.

Nothing wrong with being in a corner as long as you're being. If we assume this 80% notebook share that leaves nearly a million desktop Macs this past quarter which is probably more than 4 million desktop Macs in a year. I think we get numb to how many that really is when we see iPad and iPhone numbers. How long ago was it when Apple sold less than 4 million total Macs in an entire year? The link below shows that the same quarter that just pasted exactly a decade ago had less than 750k Mac unit sales. I think the Mac is doing exquisitely in a Post-PC era as Post-PC buyers are highly considering the Mac if and when they do feel they need to get a new traditional PC truck. If the desktops were really that pointless would Apple had put so much effort into the new Mac Pro? I don't think they would have.

I also don't think the Mac mini is heavy on R&D and some of those efforts could have lead to making other products (like the Apple TV, iMac and Mac Pro) smaller and more power efficient. If not, I think it's clear it offers advantages for certain buyers like me who want a headless iTunes Server (waiting for update before retiring my tired old flatscreen iMac from 2004) or who are switching. I even know a couple people that went the Mac mini route because the price was reasonable just to say month later they were getting an iMac or MacBook Air/Pro.

I will be annoyed if the Mac mini dies (assuming it's not being replaced with an equivalent product in that category).

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post #75 of 121
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) Not familiar with Rincon but is it inspirational?
A couple of decades ago (literally) I spent some time working with a vendor just outside of the Santa Barbara area. Of course being from the East coast I knew little about that area and more so no idea what all the beach names related to. I'm not sure if the name referred to a specific beach or a geological feature only. However Rincon apparently means Horn in Spanish and there is a horn feature along the coast.

As it was I went to several beaches along the coast there. Very inspirational for a young man I might say. In Santa Barbara itself the beach is most interesting in that Oil and tar oooze right out of the ground, you have to keep an eye out for clumps of sand and tar else you will be trying to wash gritty tar off your feet. That idea of tar and oil oozing out of the ground has stayed with me all these years. I'm not sure if that is inspirational or not but it does cause you to stop and think a bit.
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2) If they were going to only do beaches (or beach adjacent places like Mavericks) wouldn't they have mentioned that instead of just saying inspirational places throughout California?
They might have but California has more beaches than there are big cats, they won't run out of names anytime soon. Personally I would prefer more focused naming conventions instead of leaving it open for any site in the state.
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3) Joshua Tree is inspirational but 1) I think the name sounds wrong for a Mac OS X codename, and 2) it's very well known compared to Mavericks so I wonder if Apple will be focusing on less familiar places.

You would be surprised at the number of people that haven't heard of these great places. I've mentioned Joshua Tree and have received blank stares in return. This isn't a California problem, there are great places all over the YS that many people have never heard of.

As for the sound, well you do realize that people still complain about Mavericks. No matter what Apple does some will have objections to a name. I like Joshua Tree due to spending some time there taking a lot of Photographs with an RZ I owned at the time. Other than the really bad sunburn (needed a cowboy hat) it was one of my better adventures. It certainly can inspire one to think different.
post #76 of 121
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Originally Posted by Mode 5 View Post



Wow!

Why wow? You can't honestly believe that public sector employees need a union. Many a community has been bankrupted because of union holding hostage communities for ever increasing wages. Not to mention is the fact that most of these unionized positions are a relative cake walk compare to working in the real world.
post #77 of 121
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Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

A couple of decades ago (literally) I spent some time working with a vendor just outside of the Santa Barbara area. Of course being from the East coast I knew little about that area and more so no idea what all the beach names related to. I'm not sure if the name referred to a specific beach or a geological feature only. However Rincon apparently means Horn in Spanish and there is a horn feature along the coast.

As it was I went to several beaches along the coast there. Very inspirational for a young man I might say. In Santa Barbara itself the beach is most interesting in that Oil and tar oooze right out of the ground, you have to keep an eye out for clumps of sand and tar else you will be trying to wash gritty tar off your feet. That idea of tar and oil oozing out of the ground has stayed with me all these years. I'm not sure if that is inspirational or not but it does cause you to stop and think a bit.

1) I didn't know the word rincón — my Spanish lessons are going great¡ — so I looked it up. It means corner or nook which does sound like a great description for a nice quite beach.

2) Are you sure it bubbles out of a beach(!) and doesn't just wash up as there are a lot of oil rigs off the SB coast? Although, that's how Jed Clampett discovered he had oil on his land.
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They might have but California has more beaches than there are big cats, they won't run out of names anytime soon. Personally I would prefer more focused naming conventions instead of leaving it open for any site in the state.

1) They do have a lot of beaches but that just seems boring to me. And note that Mavericks isn't a beach. There is a Maverick's Beach (note that it's Maverick — no 's' — with a possessive) but the name Apple choose was of the surf location, as in, the wave break. That's inspirational. In fact, I saw it this past weekend as I was fairly close to it for the Big Sur Marathon in Monterey. I brought my surf board and wetsuit but there is no way I'm surfing that wave… at least not until after the '24' miniseries and WWDC… then I can kill myself trying to ride a wave.

2) I think inspirational things in California is focused sufficiently. I'd really like to learn more about the inspirational or awe inspiring things in this state that I haven't heard of and will be disappointed if it's just another surf location or a beach.

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post #78 of 121
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) I didn't know the word rincón — my Spanish lessons are going great¡ — so I looked it up. It means corner or nook which does sound like a great description for a nice quite beach.

There's also a Rincón in Puerto Rico that known for its surfing. There's a large white (non hispanic) population that has taken up residence there.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rinc%C3%B3n,_Puerto_Rico
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
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post #79 of 121
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Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


California is a very interesting place that is unfortunately inhabited by some really bad people. It attracts the worst of society like horse shit attracts flies. If it wasn't for that I'd wouldn't be so negative on the place. Of course that shouldn't dismiss what the good people in the state have done over the years but they really need to clean the place up. A lot of good could be accomplished there with a death penalty and a few judges not embarrassed to use it.

So no I don't hate California at all as a place, I hate what it has become as a state. As far as Apple goes there are plenty of places in California that they could choose from for names. Names that can inspire like Joshua Tree or put a bit of fright into to like Death Valley. Personally I'd rather see them stick with beaches as California has plenty. How about Rincon. Maybe we should start a thread on possible beach names for the next Mac OS rev.

 

I didn't mean to drag it that far off topic. It was meant as more light hearted humor, but I would be interested in being made aware of any point in history where publicly sanctioned executions actually fixed anything. California has faced years of budget problems for quite a few reasons. As you may know property tax assessment increases are limited so as to avoid anyone being forced out of their homes in areas of high inflation. It has been significant in the coastal areas, but we should have cut back on services long ago. California is also one of the states that does pay out more in federal taxes than the state receives back, which doesn't really help as the spread is covered by higher taxes at the state level and to a lesser degree in the form of the state portion of sales tax.

 

Anyway I do like interesting spots like Joshua Tree. I'm being a little presumptuous on that, as I've never been there. The photos of it look very cool though, and places like that, Ansa Borrego, and Mono Lake are less well known than Santa Barbara, Yosemite, possibly Sequoia National Park, etc. With some of those they may as well reference Santa Monica for the cliche factor.

post #80 of 121
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Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


I don't disagree with much of what you have said in your entire message but I'm not certain I agree with this entirely. First off if anybody really thinks that desktops are doing well sales wise they have to be nuts. The demand for desktops has fallen substantially. In Apples world they likely have gone past 80% laptops though I'm kinda hoping for reinvigorated Mac Pro sales shifting that some. All one has to do is to walk into any store selling computers and see that desktops, if they even exist are relegated to a corner in the store. This is a fact in Apples stores too.

And yet here is an article today saying PC gaming now exceeds console gaming (by dollar amount): http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2014/04/analyst-pc-gaming-now-brings-in-more-money-than-console-gaming/

 

I think it's like Steve Jobs said, desktops are just becoming the "trucks" of computers. But that doesn't have to mean work only, high end gaming needs a truck, and gaming is increasing.

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