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Beleaguered BlackBerry forced to dispel rumors about potential exit from handset business

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
Though BlackBerry was once a market leader, times have become so tough for the Canadian smartphone maker that the company's CEO was prompted on Thursday to publicly refute rumors that his company might exit the handset business entirely.

Q10
BlackBerry Q10. | Source: BlackBerry


BlackBerry apparently has no plans to sell its devices business, Chief Executive John Chen said in a statement posted to the company's official blog. Nor does it plan to abandon the smartphone market "any time soon."

"I know you still love your BlackBerry devices," Chen said to devotees. "I love them too and I know they created the foundation of this company. Our focus today is on finding a way to make this business profitable."

That means that smartphones may play a less important role going forward in BlackBerry, but a role nonetheless. Outside of its devices business, BlackBerry apparently plans to seek out other revenue streams from enterprise services, software, messaging and more.

Still, Chen said that his company plans to "continue to fight" against rivals such as Apple and Samsung, which are now the two most dominant forces in the smartphone hardware business.

BlackBerry


"We will do everything in our power to continue to rebuild this business and deliver devices with the iconic keyboard and other features that you have come to expect from this brand," he said.

Chen was forced to make the comments after Reuters ran a story stating that Chen would consider selling off BlackBerry's handset division. For his part, the BlackBerry CEO says he was misquoted, though the publication has not yet issued any kind of retraction.

The fact that people are not talking about new BlackBerry handsets, but rather whether the company will release any future devices at all, is yet another sign of how far the company has fallen.

Earlier this month, BlackBerry cut ties with T-Mobile, the fourth-largest wireless provider in the U.S. The move was apparently part of a new strategy reducing its reliance on carriers to sell their products. T-Mobile then dismissed the departure as a non-issue, as the CEO revealed that BlackBerry users represent just over 1 percent of its total customer base.

BlackBerry's current struggles were actually predicted by late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs in 2010, when the then-CEO made a surprise appearance on one of his company's quarterly earnings calls. At the time, Jobs noted that Apple had sold 14.1 million iPhones in the preceding quarter, "handily" beating BlackBerry's 12.1 million units sold in the same period.

"We've now passed (BlackBerry, then known as) RIM," Jobs said. "I don't see them catching up with us in the foreseeable future. It will be a challenge for them to create a mobile software platform and convince developers to support a third platform."
post #2 of 37

They’ll announce the discontinuation of their hardware lines by June.

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post #3 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

BlackBerry apparently has no plans to sell its devices business, Chief Executive John Chen said in a statement posted to the company's official blog. Nor does it plan to abandon the smartphone market "any time soon."

His statement would have had more impact had he not been checking the clock on the wall while he made it...
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post #4 of 37
What will they do with QNX -- imbedded in most automobiles? And much more?

http://www.qnx.com/company/customer_stories/

http://www.qnx.com/company/30ways/

RIMM acquired QNX for $200 Million in 2010.
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post #5 of 37
Spin off the hardware division to make really good add-on keyboards/cases/covers/sliders for other brands of touchscreen phones. People love their key style. (I'm a touchscreen man myself! But I know people who don't mind bulk and always get a physical keyboard.)
post #6 of 37
So it's really EOL.
post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

What will they do with QNX -- imbedded in most automobiles? And much more?

I assume that will depend on if they can create any synergies between the QNX stuff and whatever products and services they will decide to keep alive. The money generated by QNX will neither be enough to keep the company alive, nor to even pay their loans. And there are multiple free RTOSs out there that could be used instead, provided any of them comes up with some reliable and professional support for them. If you talk to car people, you will find that developer support was one of their main issues with e.g. VXWorks, leading to almost all of them jumping on QNX, it was not so much the product itself.

The problem for BB is really that none of their products and services is sufficient to keep them alive, and most do not make sense without the others. Why use BES if there are no more BB devices? There are plenty of competitors out there to manage iOS, Android, WP and BB, and especially MS's new management platform, which will address mobile and legacy devices including Macs and Windows PCs, will destroy BES over time; why treat mobile and conventional devices separately, when everything can be integrated? Without handhelds and MDM, what is left? Breadcrumbs from QNX and only cost from BBM...

If Chen does not find a way to keep the handheld business alive, the remaining business will not be worth keeping around. And with the Canadian government blocking potential buyers from Asia, his chances of selling the business are meager, too.
post #8 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

What will they do with QNX -- imbedded in most automobiles? And much more?

http://www.qnx.com/company/customer_stories/

http://www.qnx.com/company/30ways/

RIMM acquired QNX for $200 Million in 2010.

And they can spin it off just as easily.

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post #9 of 37
"Say you will, say you won't, make up your mind tonight
Say you will, say you won't be my guiding light
Say you will, say you won't, make up your mind this time
Say you do, say you do, you wanna be mine"

- Foreigner (Britsh American band, which by my alchemy is pretty much Canadian....;-) )
post #10 of 37
The way he killed the company CEO should stand for Chief Execution Officer.
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post #11 of 37
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Originally Posted by knowitall View Post

So it's really EOL.

Short term they've slowed the losses, but long term, what is their strategy for beating iOS and Android and Windows Phone? As far as I can tell, buying time for QNX won't lead to a bright future. It is heading for the same fate as PalmOS and webOS.

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post #12 of 37
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Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

The way he killed the company CEO should stand for Chief Execution Officer.

Somebody had to...

 

Edit: And don't forget he's working for free! (13 mil shares only)

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post #13 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

......beating iOS and Android and Windows Phone?.....

So I ask is that even possible at this point?
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post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

Somebody had to...

Edit: And don't forget he's working for free! (13 mil shares only)

I don't see why anyone had to. They had a large customer base, and if they had released the Z10 instead of the god awful Storm they probably wouldn't have lost all the customers that they did.
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post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

So I ask is that even possible at this point?

Not with the cards they have in play. They need the equivalent of a game changer. A "me too look I can do touchscreens and apps" strategy isn't enough.

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post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


His statement would have had more impact had he not been checking the clock on the wall while he made it...

You mean 'taking' the clock and pictures from the wall, and emptying his desk/cabinets.

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post #17 of 37
Reports of my death have been greatly [accurate].”

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post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by knowitall View Post

So it's really EOL.

Short term they've slowed the losses, but long term, what is their strategy for beating iOS and Android and Windows Phone? As far as I can tell, buying time for QNX won't lead to a bright future. It is heading for the same fate as PalmOS and webOS.

QNX for phones and tablets is dead! However QNX as an embedded OS for automotive, instrumentation, etc. has a bright future and little competition:
Quote:
30 Ways QNX Touches Your Life

People encounter QNX technology every day when they:
  1. Use Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube - QNX technology provides the software foundation for the world’s highest-capacity routers, which handle the data, voice, and video traffic for hundreds of millions of Internet users every day.
  2. Flip a light switch - QNX technology controls thousands of power-generation systems worldwide, from wind turbines to nuclear stations to hydroelectric plants.
  3. Call for help - By leveraging the unmatched reliability of QNX technology, 9 1 1 dispatch systems deliver emergency assistance 24/7, nonstop.
  4. Call for help on the road - The QNX-based OnStar system, deployed in dozens of car models, automatically calls for help in a crash and can even provide emergency responders with the car's exact location.
  5. Use green energy - QNX-based power-grid simulators help utilities integrate electricity from solar panels, wind farms, and other renewable energy sources.
  6. Save gas - QNX-based traffic control systems reduce fuel consumption by optimizing traffic flow, minimizing traffic jams, and reducing waits at intersections.
  7. Eat a jelly donut - QNX-based food inspection systems detect dangerous contaminants and can even spot items with missing ingredients, such as jelly donuts that have no jelly.
  8. Get a caffeine fix - Car navigation systems based on QNX technology not only provide automatic route selection and turn-by-turn directions, but can even track down the nearest coffee shop if you’re thirsting for a latté.
  9. Shop online - Online retailers like Amazon.com and Avnet rely on QNX-based warehouse automation systems to move massive amounts of merchandise every day.
  10. Watch TV - QNX technology keeps couch potatoes happy, controlling television stations, delivering cable signals, and even powering universal remotes.
  11. Watch an action flick - QNX technology powers motion-control systems that create some of Hollywood’s most spectacular special effects and stunts.
  12. Take a train - From high-speed trains to subway cars, QNX-based systems go the distance, controlling locomotives and coordinating railway traffic.
  13. Fly in a plane - QNX technology is at the core of pilot-training simulators and air-traffic control systems worldwide.
  14. Board a boat - QNX-based navigation and radar systems keep cruise ships on course by helping crews navigate through fog, bad weather, and narrow estuaries.
  15. Buy shoes - Footwear vendors like ASICS and Brown Shoe rely on QNX-based warehouse systems to move their products from the factory floor to the shoe store.
  16. Keep cool in the checkout line - QNX technology controls the HVAC systems in many of the biggest big-box stores in North America.
  17. Stay connected while driving - Using innovative QNX software, car infotainment systems connect seamlessly to Bluetooth phones, MP3 players, USB sticks, and a variety of other devices and services.
  18. Build a sundeck - Using QNX-based machine-vision systems, sawmill operators extract the maximum amount of lumber from every tree.
  19. Mail a letter - QNX technology helps mail-sorting machines push the performance envelope, processing up to 40,000 letters per hour.
  20. Visit the doctor - QNX technology brings reliability to a host of diagnostic devices, including ECG machines, angiography systems, cardiac monitors, and bone density analyzers.
  21. Take medicine - QNX-based vision systems scan for defects in a variety of manufactured products, from pharmaceutical blister packs to the lids of peanut butter jars.
  22. Get better - QNX-based cancer treatment devices use proton beams to target tumors precisely, without damaging nearby organs.
  23. Wash socks - A QNX-based system automatically configures control panels for washing machines and tests each panel to make sure it functions correctly.
  24. Breathe clean air - QNX-based building-automation systems help factories, universities, and other large facilities slash power consumption by up to 50%, reducing the amount of fossil fuels burned for electricity.
  25. Go to college - Students and professors worldwide use QNX technology to perform medical research, explore new forms of energy generation, and even discover new planets.
  26. See better - Using a QNX-based LASIK system, doctors perform bladeless laser surgery to help people reduce their dependency on glasses and contact lenses.
  27. Buy a book - Bookstores throughout North America rely on QNX-based point-of-sale systems to deliver highly personalized service to their customers.
  28. Play video poker - QNX technology powers intercasino gaming systems that can pay out multi-million-dollar winnings, with zero tolerance for error.
  29. Drive over a bridge - QNX technology helps reduce drawbridge congestion by controlling automated bridge raising systems.
  30. Go for a digital drive - QNX-based digital instrument clusters are changing the face of in-car computing, combining virtual speedometers with navigation displays, backup cameras, and other content to provide drivers with the most appropriate information for every drive mode or road condition.

http://www.qnx.com/company/30ways/
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post #19 of 37

"Beleaguered Blackberry"

 

I like it! Much better alliteration than the previous "beleaguered" catch-phrase...

post #20 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdq2 View Post

"Beleaguered Blackberry"

I like it! Much better alliteration than the previous "beleaguered" catch-phrase...

I wonder if Blackberry will become a verb like blackberried or blackburied much like the term Osborne Effect came from Obsorne's poor decision.

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post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Not with the cards they have in play. They need the equivalent of a game changer. A "me too look I can do touchscreens and apps" strategy isn't enough.

I was actually talking in general. I do however think that there was a window in time in which BB could've been a contender in the 'touchscreen and apps' game, and botched it with dreadful hardware.
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post #22 of 37
C'mon, this whole article was design to allow the author to bring the words RIM and Jobs next to each other. See last paragraph... Lol.

Back from the gutter, QNX may be cool but it is a small software company and offers no chance at supporting a relatively capital intensive smartphone business. QNX is to all its licensees as ARM is to smartphones. Small, cool but everyone else makes the big bucks.

BB cannot compete in smartphones. Apple and Samsung have destroyed handset economics by throwing billions at each launch (though very different spending patterns). Google and MS have destroyed OS economics by giving them away. Good, MS, etc. have destroyed MDM economics for BB who are already heavily discounting their once powerful service revenues.
Niche markets are not enough to keep BB afloat as iPhones and Galaxies eat up the remaining advantages that BB had but cannot actively defend.

PS Apologies to Dreyfus2 who already said most of this further up. #readothercomments1st
Edited by Capnbob - 4/10/14 at 3:17pm
post #23 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I wonder if Blackberry will become a verb like blackberried or blackburied much like the term Osborne Effect came from Obsorne's poor decision.

There are so many choices for the branding of epic collapse... To get "Nokia'd Out", to get "Motorol'led Over" are two bigger and more dominant player allusions who have ceased to be.

BB are a classic example of a small player in a smaller pool which made them look mighty in the early smartphone days (like HTC) but they really never stood a chance at scaling to become a real player given the size and ruthlessness of the sharks that entered when the pool opened up to the ocean. A transformation started in 2007, the massive investment of every penny of FCF in the attempt to grow scale and relevance to be able to take the commercial fight to Apple and Samsung would have been their only chance to maintain independence as a handset maker in the market of 1Bn phones per year.

If the trial revelations between Apple and Samsung have shown us anything, it is that beneath the calm, cocky exteriors, even the $200Bn behemoths were showing an uncharacteristic level of panic about the long game vs. Each other, dropping 10s of $Bns on marketing and supply chain each year. How does a relative pipsqueak like BB survive when it ignores this seismic shift for 3 years.
post #24 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capnbob View Post

If the trial revelations between Apple and Samsung have shown us anything, it is that beneath the calm, cocky exteriors, even the $200Bn behemoths were showing an uncharacteristic level of panic...

That's what I would expect from a good company. The ones that acted so cocky that Apple had no business making a phone are either now gone, nearly gone, or their handset division is just a shell of its former glory.

There is that old saying, "Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they're out to get you." Yet in business they are out to get you so being paranoid is healthy.

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post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

QNX for phones and tablets is dead! However QNX as an embedded OS for automotive, instrumentation, etc. has a bright future and little competition:

I wonder if BB owns QNX lock stock and barrel. They may not have rights to the embedded market, such as for the automobile as someone else did a lot of work with the interface to the sensors and getting the electronics to function over a wide dynamic temperature range.
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post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capnbob View Post

There are so many choices for the branding of epic collapse... To get "Nokia'd Out", to get "Motorol'led Over" are two bigger and more dominant player allusions who have ceased to be.

BB are a classic example of a small player in a smaller pool which made them look mighty in the early smartphone days (like HTC) but they really never stood a chance at scaling to become a real player given the size and ruthlessness of the sharks that entered when the pool opened up to the ocean. A transformation started in 2007, the massive investment of every penny of FCF in the attempt to grow scale and relevance to be able to take the commercial fight to Apple and Samsung would have been their only chance to maintain independence as a handset maker in the market of 1Bn phones per year.

Everyone from Palm and RIM to the Microsoft behemoth who had a good laugh when Apple entered the phone market with a cell phone without a keyboard in 2007 lost close to 4 years of market place as they chuckled and failed to adjust to the changing world of communications and access to information. Microsoft was the slowest to react, and even with all their resources and using Nokia to get to market, was the last to offer a product to counter Apple's dominance.

I'm sure it's cold comfort to Microsoft that after buying Nokia (a once world leader) that they barely rank ahead of BB in sales impact.
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post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


That's what I would expect from a good company. The ones that acted so cocky that Apple had no business making a phone are either now gone, nearly gone, or their handset division is just a shell of its former glory.

There is that old saying, "Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they're out to get you." Yet in business they are out to get you so being paranoid is healthy.

Actually, it's this: "“Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't after you” 
― Joseph HellerCatch-22

 

A wonderful book, as fresh and funny today as when it was published 52 years ago. Absolutely packed with the wisdom of the absurd - underpinning the book throughout:

 

“There was only one catch and that was Catch-22, which specified that a concern for one's safety in the face of dangers that were real and immediate was the process of a rational mind. Orr was crazy and could be grounded. All he had to do was ask; and as soon as he did, he would no longer be crazy and would have to fly more missions. Orr would be crazy to fly more missions and sane if he didn't, but if he was sane he had to fly them. If he flew them he was crazy and didn't have to; but if he didn't want to he was sane and had to. Yossarian was moved very deeply by the absolute simplicity of this clause of Catch-22 and let out a respectful whistle.

'That's some catch, that Catch-22,' he observed.

'It's the best there is,' Doc Daneeka agreed.” 
― Joseph HellerCatch-22

 

BlackBerry's co-CEOS when the iPhone was introduced - Jim Balsillie and Mike Lazaridis - belong in the pages of Catch-22. Here is a prime selection of their priceless observations:

 

http://www.businessinsider.com/rim-ceo-quotes-2011-9?op=1

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post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Everyone from Palm and RIM to the Microsoft behemoth who had a good laugh when Apple entered the phone market with a cell phone without a keyboard in 2007 lost close to 4 years of market place as they chuckled and failed to adjust to the changing world of communications and access to information. Microsoft was the slowest to react, and even with all their resources and using Nokia to get to market, was the last to offer a product to counter Apple's dominance.

I'm sure it's cold comfort to Microsoft that after buying Nokia (a once world leader) that they barely rank ahead of BB in sales impact.

Would it really have mattered when they adjusted? Moto and HTC adjusted rather quickly and it has benefitted them very little. The consultation prize is surviving rather than dying. Apple has most certainly earned it's way, and sadly Samsung has cheated and bought it's way.
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post #29 of 37

A cautionary tale.  Complete reversals of fortune are possible in the phone business in a relatively short amount of time.  I remember when RIM was the hot stock/company/phone that everyone was talking about.

 

Microsoft came back from the grave with their Windows phone.  I'm sure Blackberry could do it too.  Don't ask me how.

 

Blackberry is a world-famous brand.  That has to be worth something.

post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by 512ke View Post

A cautionary tale.  Complete reversals of fortune are possible in the phone business in a relatively short amount of time.  I remember when RIM was the hot stock/company/phone that everyone was talking about.

Microsoft came back from the grave with their Windows phone.  I'm sure Blackberry could do it too.  Don't ask me how.

Blackberry is a world-famous brand.  That has to be worth something.

Reversals of fortunes can happen in any type of business. It usually starts with the hiring of a non bonehead CEO.
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post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by 512ke View Post
 

A cautionary tale.  Complete reversals of fortune are possible in the phone business in a relatively short amount of time.  I remember when RIM was the hot stock/company/phone that everyone was talking about.

 

Microsoft came back from the grave with their Windows phone.  I'm sure Blackberry could do it too.  Don't ask me how.

 

Blackberry is a world-famous brand.  That has to be worth something.

More likely it will be a new entrant that totally disrupts an existing industry or industries. Apple is notable for having disrupted quite a few; personal music players, personal computing, music and visual content distribution, phones, etc. Two decades from now, it's almost certain that the leaders we know today - Apple, Google, Amazon, etc. - will be fundamentally challenged and perhaps disrupted entirely by advances that we can't even perceive at this time.

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post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

More likely it will be a new entrant that totally disrupts an existing industry or industries. Apple is notable for having disrupted quite a few; personal music players, personal computing, music and visual content distribution, phones, etc. Two decades from now, it's almost certain that the leaders we know today - Apple, Google, Amazon, etc. - will be fundamentally challenged and perhaps disrupted entirely by advances that we can't even perceive at this time.

Realising the next technology curve is key.
Like the classic Ice manufacturing industry.

It started out with a bunch of people harvesting ice blocks from the Antarctic and bring it to the rest of the world.

The next curve was making an Ice factory that made Ice and sold it to the people.

The next curve was making a refrigerator for the home.

Was it worth building technology for even the next curve like having super powers like the lady in frozen to create Ice from thin air ??

All of these technology shifts will render there predecessor tech obsolete. Every one out there is looking out for computations next curve. The search goes on.
post #33 of 37
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
I wonder if Blackberry will become a verb like blackberried or blackburied much like the term Osborne Effect came from Obsorne's poor decision.

 

Remember “Genesis does what Nintendon’t”?

 

It certainly seems that “Droid does” has gone the way of Sega.

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post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


His statement would have had more impact had he not been checking the clock on the wall while he made it...

 

...with his hands behind his back so you can't see that his fingers were crossed...

post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post


<<< Pardon the snip of a great post... wanted to concentrate on this though >>>

BlackBerry's co-CEOS when the iPhone was introduced - Jim Balsillie and Mike Lazaridis - belong in the pages of Catch-22. Here is a prime selection of their priceless observations:

http://www.businessinsider.com/rim-ceo-quotes-2011-9?op=1

From the link, this quote stands out:
Quote:
Jim Balsillie's first reaction to the iPhone on an earnings call was incomprehensible

This gem comes from hedge fund manager Eric Jackson on Forbes. Good luck figuring out what Balsillie's talking about here:

Yeah on the iPhone touch, I mean I don’t know, we do a lot of focused groups in what we do, there’s a lot of market research in what we do, we had a lot of market research from our customers in the markets on what the market expects from a solution. However, there has been some debate previous on graffiti and different touch and tactility things and [mechanical] vulnerability costs and battery kind of things and tactility things. I think the best thing will be that for these things to just get in to market and get going, and its just there’s just so many dimensions in our space happen sometimes people over define the category like its all about for so at last its all about the keyboard or its all about some input mechanism or its all about music play or something.

And I think it’s a bit of multi-dimensional, it is a lot of multi-dimensional conversion space that we play in and it tends to be iterative and evolutionary. My experience is one person may be make a baby in nine months, nine people can’t make a baby in one month. But who knows may be some natural constructs can be shifted and we’ll have to revive those views and they can shorten these realities. But I think the best thing, the good thing is this, there is a lot of attention to this space, its growing the space, its validating extensions to the space. On a leadership positions, we see the growth current — and really keep it up and meant some go in the future. And that’s really what I focus on. I am not really want to play a gamesmanship, my input mechanisms funkier than your input mechanism.

We’re really focused on compelling user experience the highly aligned relationships with the carriers and a tremendous amount of channel support and service support and care, and application extension, because our experience is there is a lot of heavy lifting there. And beyond that I can’t say as I really pay that much attention to all these little dynamics because it doesn’t help me, help my customers and help and channels more and so let it be what it will be.

In terms of pricing of (inaudible) Curve sometimes they do special promos for new products, sometime they are slightly lower cost structure for us to make them. A lot of good carriers special programs and positioning, they excited and see an opportunity and sometime cause things for us and you also can see it kind of service plan they bundle to it and that kind of ads they allow to it. So, and different piece of hardware priced differently in different markets for us so, but the 8800 is a little more expensive in the Curve but its delightful to see the carriers pricing the Curve so aggressively because, my experience is when they do this it should actually takes two or three months for the momentum to really sort of kick in the gear.

So if you start doing stuff like that in May, you generally start to really, the channel as we get bigger are kind of slow train are coming but comes sort of midish August, they really start gathering speed and then you can ride that through the back to school and the sort of Christmas kind of phase so, that’s we are pleased to see it and I don’t know if the 8800 that’ll shift that way maybe, maybe not, there’s just so many different programs and so many strategies. Its hard for me to sort of generalize it all.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/rim-ceo-quotes-2011-9?op=1#ixzz2yYw8bpB9

This is what happens when you try to take shortcuts to success.

1) read book on Steve Jobs;

2) note to self, "must take acid soon" ;

3) become addicted and do tabs like pop-tarts for breakfast before an important earnings call interview;

4) not only flummox your investors, but your own employees as to what they are doing and trying to accomplish;

5) no doubt sees a crazy hippy-looking dude in a pink t-shirt dropping him into a grave while cursing like a drunk sailor... but sees bliss in that.

Moral of the story:
Don't do drugs when you're already a CEO of a major tech company. Time and place for everything... 1smoking.gif
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


That's what I would expect from a good company. The ones that acted so cocky that Apple had no business making a phone are either now gone, nearly gone, or their handset division is just a shell of its former glory.

There is that old saying, "Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they're out to get you." Yet in business they are out to get you so being paranoid is healthy.

And so it is in life, too.

"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


I wonder if BB owns QNX lock stock and barrel. They may not have rights to the embedded market, such as for the automobile as someone else did a lot of work with the interface to the sensors and getting the electronics to function over a wide dynamic temperature range.

And if BB go under, will Apple buy QNX from them? Probably not, but wondering.

"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
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