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Review follow-up: Gaming on Amazon's Fire TV and Fire Controller

post #1 of 62
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When Amazon launched its Fire TV earlier this month, the company positioned casual gaming as one of the set-top streamer's "bonus" features. In this review follow-up, AppleInsider picks up the controller to find out if mobile gaming is ready for the living room.



As mentioned in our initial Fire TV review, it comes as no surprise that Amazon wants to differentiate its set-top box from the competition. Apple TV and Roku already have a substantial lead in large installed user bases, while Google's latest Chromecast offering comes at a hard-to-beat price point.

Not marketed as a "killer feature," Fire TV's ability to throw made-for-mobile games up on the big screen promises to bring a new dynamic to the streaming media player space. And in spite of downplaying the feature -- it's shoehorned between "Easy to Use" and "Made for Music" on Fire TV's product page -- Amazon thinks so too.

The company built Amazon Game Studio which released its first-ever title alongside the box. With a quad-core 1.7GHz Qualcomm Krait 300 SoC with 2GB of RAM and an Adreno 320 GPU, Fire TV is a machine more than capable of playing casual, bite-sized games, including Amazon's ambitious Sev Zero project.



If that isn't enough to illustrate Amazon's new found zeal for gaming, Fire TV has only one first-party hardware accessory add-on: a game controller.

At $40, the Fire Game Controller comes in at nearly half the price of Fire TV. On the surface, it looks good, with a layout identical to that of Microsoft's Xbox controller (even down to the X, Y, B, A action buttons). Aside from components meant for pure gaming, Amazon borrowed buttons from the voice-activated remote that comes with the Fire TV, including Home, Return, Menu and video transport controls.


Microsoft's Xbox One game controller (top) and Amazon's Fire Controller.


Two AA batteries power the device, while Bluetooth is used for data transport. This makes setup easy and allows for expansion to other Fire-branded portables down the line (something hinted at in certain games with a "connect your device to..." message).

Basically, on paper the controller sounds good and we expected usability would be somewhat high considering the price tag.

Amazon appears to have put some thought into the design and materials used. Chassis build quality is good, with zero flex and a matte finish that feels robust. Ergonomics are fair, though the grips are not what we would consider comfortable. For users with small hands, the handles may be too thick to reach the right joystick with ease.



Inclusion of Fire TV's system buttons was also a good move and we found ourselves reaching for the controller more often than the included remote. It should be noted that Amazon has incorporated a dedicated button for GameCircle, the company's gaming hub where users can earn achievements, compete on leaderboards and connect with friends.

Setup is quick and painless, largely thanks to Bluetooth. Fire TV discovered our controller immediately and we were off and running within seconds. Around back near the left bumper is a bank of four LEDs for player number identification. The lights will cycle and blink as the controller searches for Fire TV and will glow steadily once connected.



Unfortunately, internal hardware like button actuators and joystick springs, failed to impress. As the only interface between user and game, a good controller needs to be comfortable, fast and intuitive. Amazon's take is adequate in some areas, but falls flat in those that count.

Our main gripe with the Fire Controller is that it constantly makes you aware of its presence. For example, in Amazon's third-person shooter Sev Zero we had to compensate for joysticks that lacked proper sensitivity (made more apparent by the fact that one side was much looser than the other). The shoulder bumpers were also difficult to actuate and trigger pull is far too shallow. We found the input buttons, as well as the D-pad, to be mushy and unresponsive.


From top: Controllers for Xbox One, Amazon Fire and PlayStation 4.


In short, the device is not designed well enough to be transparent in the gaming experience. To be fair, designing a gaming controller is an incredibly difficult task. Even console heavyweights Nintendo, Sony and Microsoft have been tweaking their products for years with each successive generation in search of controller nirvana.

Game selection is another shortcoming for Fire TV. Although a number of titles were ported at launch, it remains unclear how many mobile-first games can translate over to light console-like play. The games that are offered look great on a large HDTV, which at the very least proves Amazon has the technical know-how to get the job done right. Now it needs content.



As expected, Fire TV gaming is nowhere near console levels, but that was never the goal. Amazon wants to target casual gamers with pick-up-and-play mid-tier titles. And for that, Fire TV is fairly successful. The two things holding the company back from delivering a truly great quick-fix gaming experience are a gussied up "parts bin" controller and lack of enticing original titles.

Amazon has given itself a nice push out of the gate in the race to extend mobile into the living room, but solid game-centric peripherals would make Fire TV a far more compelling platform. Unfortunately, without a proper controller the games category feels more like a slick experiment than a full-blown feature; we can understand why Amazon is loath to market it more aggressively.

For those who don't mind mediocre hardware or are just looking to get in a few headshots between episodes of "Mad Men," the Amazon Fire Controller is available for $39.99. As of this writing, the device is backordered for an entire month, with shipments resuming in mid-May.
post #2 of 62

Can’t do anything but copy, can they…

post #3 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Can’t do anything but copy, can they…
I thought the same thing. How is this any different than samsung copying the iPhone? That thing is a mirror of the Xbox controller.

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post #4 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

I thought the same thing. How is this any different than samsung copying the iPhone? That thing is a mirror of the Xbox controller.

You do realize that Apple's guidelines for a controller are very Xbox-esque
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post #5 of 62
Great job burying the lead. Difficult article to read.

You write for a full seven paragraphs about the controller before you mention it's terrible at actually being a responsive game controller. For god's sake you talk about double-A batteries and the chassis before you mention you can't play a flagship game properly because the controller isn't responsive enough. Who cares about AA batteries and the chassis when the thing doesn't work?!?!

Lesson 0 in making a controller- it needs to be reliably responsive.
Lesson 0 in reviewing a controller- if it fails at being a controller, don't laud the easy setup before you mention it fails at being a controller.
post #6 of 62
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post #7 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Can’t do anything but copy, can they…
post #8 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by iObserve View Post

Great job burying the lead. Difficult article to read.

You write for a full seven paragraphs about the controller before you mention it's terrible at actually being a responsive game controller. For god's sake you talk about double-A batteries and the chassis before you mention you can't play a flagship game properly because the controller isn't responsive enough. Who cares about AA batteries and the chassis when the thing doesn't work?!?!

Lesson 0 in making a controller- it needs to be reliably responsive.
Lesson 0 in reviewing a controller- if it fails at being a controller, don't laud the easy setup before you mention it fails at being a controller.

First off, this isn't a review. Secondly, nowhere in the article does it say the controller is a failure. It is a so-so product compared to console counterparts and detracts from the gaming experience, but it works. You may not be in the market, but those who are may care about setup and design.
post #9 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Future Man View Post

[/quote

Copying seems to work for other tech firms maybe this is not Nobel but it seems to work for the likes of SAMSUNG
post #10 of 62
Some counterpoints.

1. Lots of people are bashing the controller as mediocre but comparing it to console controllers is unfair. Amazons controller is much better than the other mobile gaming type controllers, which are horrible. It is also about the same as PC controllers. What is most important is that Fire TV is compatible with any Bluetooth controller so there will be better controller options from third parties soon. The controller interoperability issue is why Amazon chose Bluetooth for its remotes and controllers over WI fi like Roku.

2. Amazon will have hundreds of games available in May. Some of them will not be mobile games but mini console games developed by their own game studio.

3. Fire TV is not a mature platform or product yet. It was redesigned several times because the execs did not like early versions and then released too early to get ahead of other product launches. The device doesn't even support Amazon cloud player yet but will in an is update next month. The USB port on the device will ultimately provide more storage space for games and media but the OS does not support it yet. It basically is the same OS that is on the Fire HDX with a few extra stuff.

The device will get better with more OS updates but unless you already are a prime customer or already have Kindle Fire HDX it would be better to wait for the second iteration of the device. I considered waiting but am already a prime member and plan to get a Kindle phone so I went ahead. I will upgrade to the next version of the device when it comes out.
post #11 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeycampbell81 View Post


First off, this isn't a review. Secondly, nowhere in the article does it say the controller is a failure. It is a so-so product compared to console counterparts and detracts from the gaming experience, but it works. You may not be in the market, but those who are may care about setup and design.

Um.  Doesn't this kind of indicate that it is?  "Review follow-up: Gaming on Amazon's Fire TV and Fire Controller"  It's the headline of the article.

post #12 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

You do realize that Apple's guidelines for a controller are very Xbox-esque

You're kidding, right? It's nowhere near the same. In what world is having a 4" touchscreen in the middle of your controls the same as an xbox controller?

Your posts have been so off target lately it's starting to get annoying.

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post #13 of 62

also undefined

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #14 of 62
Oh yes and what is with the mediocre hardware slam? Compared to what? An X Box, playstation or Wii U which are entirely other types of devices? By that standard the I Pod has inferior hardware to the I Pad which is itself inferior to the MacBook. But when comparing it to other similar systems it has the best hardware. Better than Roku. Better than Chromecast. Better than Apple TV. Not some theoretical Apple TV that may exist in the future but the one that exists today. Which makes bashing the Fire controller particularly ridiculous. As compared to what? The controller that currently does not exist for Apple TV or I Pod or I Phone or I Pad AT ALL?

The main issue with Fire TV right now is that the software is not fully ready yet. But it has by far the best hardware of any set box or of any mini gaming system. Comparing apples to oranges just to slam a competitor is unethical. Wait till the new Apple TV comes out to slam the hardware as inferior because that is when it will actually be true.

You want to know what is actually inferior gaming hardware for a set top box? The Roku 3. You have to play games with their slow difficult to use combo motion sensor WiFi remote. It stinks and has not caught on. Or Chromecast which hasn't even gotten mirroring games from android devices right. Ugh
post #15 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

You're kidding, right? It's nowhere near the same. In what world is having a 4" touchscreen in the middle of your controls the same as an xbox controller?

Your posts have been so off target lately it's starting to get annoying.

No I'm not kidding. Did you miss this? Have you not seen a plethora of controllers released in the last several months, and reviewed right here on AI?

http://toucharcade.com/2013/06/10/wwdc-2013-more-details-emerge-on-official-ios-game-controllers/
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post #16 of 62
The entire thing, completely half baked from start to finish....like all Amazon hardware & services.

Meant only for those who don't know any better. Hence Gary Busey as the spokesman.
post #17 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

No I'm not kidding. Did you miss this? Have you not seen a plethora of controllers released in the last several months, and reviewed right here on AI?

http://toucharcade.com/2013/06/10/wwdc-2013-more-details-emerge-on-official-ios-game-controllers/

None of the images in your linked article look remotely like an Xbox controller. Did you link the wrong thing?
post #18 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregInPrague View Post

None of the images in your linked article look remotely like an Xbox controller. Did you link the wrong thing?

The only difference is the left side joystick/D pad configuration and the L2/R2 buttons aren't triggers.



Take into account that the drawing is just a guideline. The actual controllers being made look a lot like the Xbox controller.

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/161477/signal-announces-rp-one-full-size-bluetooth-game-controller-for-apples-ios-devices

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/161638/review-steelseries-stratus-portable-wireless-gaming-controller-for-iphone-ipad
Edited by dasanman69 - 4/12/14 at 10:35am
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post #19 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregInPrague View Post

None of the images in your linked article look remotely like an Xbox controller. Did you link the wrong thing?

He may have been thinking of this one, certainly not a design pushed by Apple AFAIK.
http://www.idownloadblog.com/2014/02/23/madcatz-xbox-ios-7-controller/

EDIT: I see the Dasanman clarification now. I guess the basic array might be similar to Apple's suggestions.
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post #20 of 62
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post
The only difference is the left side joystick/D pad configuration and the L2/R2 buttons aren't triggers.

 

Which makes it completely different, both in usability and in form.

post #21 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Which makes it completely different, both in usability and in form.

Using that logic Samsung phones are 'completely' different. So then what's the problem? If small variations make a product completely different than it should be all the time not some of the time.
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post #22 of 62

Did anybody really think that Amazon's TV entry would have been groundbreaking and awe-inspiring? Nope.

 

I'm waiting for what Apple has coming up in the next few months. I rather wait for something game-changing than to settle for an also-ran. Basically this is an AppleTV for Android that runs games that are half-baked. I don't see the point.

post #23 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeycampbell81 View Post


First off, this isn't a review. Secondly, nowhere in the article does it say the controller is a failure. It is a so-so product compared to console counterparts and detracts from the gaming experience, but it works. You may not be in the market, but those who are may care about setup and design.

Mikey, Miss the point much? 

post #24 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

The entire thing, completely half baked from start to finish....like all Amazon hardware & services.

Meant only for those who don't know any better. Hence Gary Busey as the spokesman.

Yeah sure chief. Easy to say when

A) the company that you are a fan of doesn't offer comparable services.

B) your preferred company does not presently have competing hardware. 

 

Apple is the best at its very limited range of products precisely because those are the only products that they choose to focus on and market, and they market it at a very high price point. Knocking the offerings of companies who choose to offer a broader range of products and services and do so at price points that other people can afford is ignorant. If it weren't for the products and services that other companies offer, your own company wouldn't survive. That is what makes the knocking of other companies so foolish. Your company can't even manufacture its own I-Pads and I-Phones without Samsung's parts. And your company can't even offer its online streaming and storage services without Microsoft and Amazon's cloud. 

So wait until your own company is able to deliver its own products and services without help from the competition first, OK? Without Samsung and other hardware suppliers, there would be no Apple. Without Microsoft's software, Apple would have never gotten off the ground in the 1970s. Without Amazon and other online infrastructure companies, no I-Cloud and no I-Tunes. Meanwhile, Samsung, Microsoft, Google, Amazon and all of Apple's competitors would still exist without Apple. Why? Because they offer products and services that Apple doesn't and can't. Apple can't even run their own business without being one of the biggest customers of their competitors, which makes your own company "someone who doesn't know any better". Or more accurately, someone who can't do any better. 

 

It is funny ... the companies that Apple keeps suing over allegedly stealing their stuff need to just simply stop supplying Apple. It isn't as if they need Apple's business to stay in business. And without their suppliers providing products and services that Apple's narrow focus can't supply on their own or even upscale quickly or well enough to become competitive if they tried, in short order there would be no Apple. But they won't, because they make more money giving Apple what Apple needs to remain in business than they will ever pay out in any lawsuit judgment. Funny how that works isn't it?

 

For goodness sakes. I bought an Apple TV. I returned it when I saw that it A) didn't support Amazon and B) it didn't mirror my last generation I-Pod Touch. Yes, it works with I-Tunes, but I have bought much more stuff through Amazon than through I-Tunes (I had an Amazon account before I-Tunes even existed) so that didn't wasn't really a value to me. So basically, for me Apple TV was worthless, or at the very least worth LESS than my Roku and less than a Chromecast, which costs 1/3 as much. At this point, there are set top boxes that are better for everyone BUT those who have other Apple devices, and Fire TV is one of them. Right now, compared to the latest set top boxes, the Apple TV is half-baked for everyone but I-Pad and I-Phone owners. If that wasn't the case I wouldn't have returned the one that I bought.

 

And even when the new Apple TV comes and blows everyone away, big deal: Amazon, Samsung and the other companies that you will bash as inferior will still make money off it because Apple will need those companies to actually manufacture the thing and deliver content to it. That is the world that Apple exists in right now. Everyone knows it, which is why Apple doesn't get the glowing media attention or inflated media attention that is going to the companies that Apple needs to be able to do their business instead.

post #25 of 62
C'mon folks. AI is just trying to be as fair as possible with the review. But being a first gen system, the fire TV and its game controller will suffer its fair share of growth pains. As one poster noted, the device is not yet fully integrated with the Amazon ecosystem. They wanted out of the gate quick enough for some reason, even when the supporting products aren't all there yet,(Possibly an attempt to get ahead of the new AppleTV). Any other feature not currently in the selling product will be 'enhancements' via software or offered in a next gen hardware. Some folks will like this product and will buy into the Amazon family. I like Amazon. I buy from their store. I don't like the Kindle. My mother-in-law has one and by default I have to support that PoS device. Once in a while it fails to connect to my WiFi. A year and a half later, it's dead. But the in-law went ahead and bought the new model. I have 6 year old iPods that are still working. And my 2 first gen iPads are still entertaining my kids. Better products last and remain relevant for a very long time. I'm just hoping the next AppleTV offers just as much features as the Roku or FireTV, if not better.
post #26 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkichline View Post
 

Did anybody really think that Amazon's TV entry would have been groundbreaking and awe-inspiring? Nope.

 

I'm waiting for what Apple has coming up in the next few months. I rather wait for something game-changing than to settle for an also-ran. Basically this is an AppleTV for Android that runs games that are half-baked. I don't see the point.

0. Basically this is AppleTV for Android? Wrong. It is AppleTV for Kindle. Which is better because Kindle has a superior ecosystem to Android.

1. Even if it was groundbreaking and awe-inspiring, you would not admit it.

2. What makes you think that the Apple TV games are going to be any better? It is going to run the games from its app store just like Fire TV does. If anything, by starting their own game studio to create games specifically for the device, that gives Fire TV the potential to have the best games of any device of its type. Apple would have to follow suit, because game developers are not going to have a financial incentive to make superior games for Apple TV that no one is going to pay more than $5 for. 

3. Apple is going to need to incorporate things that are already in Fire TV (or that they knew would be in Fire TV), Roku 3 and Chromecast to be "groundbreaking and awe-inspiring." Which, of course, would make it less groundbreaking and awe-inspiring. Not that you would admit it. But the reality is that there is only so much that you can do with a set top box without making it A) too big or B) too expensive. They can do Fire TV with better software, or they can make a full-fledged competitor to the X-Box or Playstation (bigger and more expensive). Even merely adding the Comcast/Time Warner cable box functionality would drive up the price well past $99. Which, of course, will result in you guys calling everything else a cheap piece of junk. 

post #27 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


You do realize that Apple's guidelines for a controller are very Xbox-esque

 

You do realize that "Xbox-esque" is not the same as an outright copy, right?

 

Most gaming controllers are similar. The Fire TV controller is far more than just "similar".

post #28 of 62

0. Great use of zero-baed indexes.

1. Yes, Kindle is DEFINITELY better than Android.

2. No, I probably would. I have Google Glass, and that's groundbreaking, although I don't use it much in practice.

3. The reason I think Apple games are going to do better is this... they are going to announce AppleTV at WWDC and probably already have a number of games work with it. In addition, they will prepare developers to build apps specifically for the device. It will also have an A7 chip at least which has really great capability and already drives Retina displays so shouldn't have an issue driving a 1080p display, especially since they can increase the clock speed without worrying about battery life or thermal design as much. I also believe that developers can make great games that command more revenue, although it's hard to compete with free.

4. I think there is much more that Apple can do in the new AppleTV that the other companies have not done. But making a controller, or opening the SDK to developers isn't really all that innovative. I think Apple is looking to build out better frameworks, tools and ecosystem to allow for better interaction with end-users. Again, only time will tell.

 

So yes, if this was truly groundbreaking or awe-inspiring, I would say something. It's just not all that.

post #29 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


The only difference is the left side joystick/D pad configuration and the L2/R2 buttons aren't triggers.



Take into account that the drawing is just a guideline. The actual controllers being made look a lot like the Xbox controller.

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/161477/signal-announces-rp-one-full-size-bluetooth-game-controller-for-apples-ios-devices

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/161638/review-steelseries-stratus-portable-wireless-gaming-controller-for-iphone-ipad

Haha!! "The only difference is..." that it is a completely different controller layout. Only the YXBA button labels are consistent. Pattern recognition: fail.

post #30 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by xPad View Post

You do realize that "Xbox-esque" is not the same as an outright copy, right?

Most gaming controllers are similar. The Fire TV controller is far more than just "similar".

I'm well aware of that, and I'm not surprised that Amazon took that route. I am however surprised at Apple's guidelines. Surely there's another way to design a controller. I would expect more from Apple than just a slightly altered 'me too' design.
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post #31 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


I'm well aware of that, and I'm not surprised that Amazon took that route. I am however surprised at Apple's guidelines. Surely there's another way to design a controller. I would expect more from Apple than just a slightly altered 'me too' design.

 

In other words, you were "well aware" of a fact that completely undermined your post, but decided to post it anyway.

 

Got it.

post #32 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by aylk View Post

Haha!! "The only difference is..." that it is a completely different controller layout. Only the YXBA button labels are consistent. Pattern recognition: fail.

See the thing is would you be saying that if MS had made the Xbox controller after Apple had issued it's guidelines? The headline on AI read 'MS bases Xbox controller on Apple's design', and most here would pick out the similarities not the differences. That's called hypocrisy in my book. Surely the mighty Apple can reimagine the lowly gaming controller instead of following the lead of Sony and MS.
Edited by dasanman69 - 4/12/14 at 12:07pm
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post #33 of 62

The entire thread of "copying the controller" is silly.

 

The controllers for the Xbox, Playstation, iOS (guidelines) and Fire TV are all somewhat similar. The kind of have to be.  There are only so many ways you can design a controller.  More so, they're designing the controller based on what buttons the ported games are going to require.  The layouts aren't patented, and this is a good thing because it enables people to go from one platform to another without too much confusion.

 

The Fire TV remote has this similar layout in the sense of "let's not re-invent everything just for the sake of being different" while actually being a specific design for the device for what they needed.  Note that other controls on the device for video and other features.

 

All in all, I find it to work very well, and I was able to jump into game play quite easily thanks to the familiarity of the controls.

post #34 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by macslut View Post

The entire thread of "copying the controller" is silly.

The controllers for the Xbox, Playstation, iOS (guidelines) and Fire TV are all somewhat similar. The kind of have to be.  There are only so many ways you can design a controller.  More so, they're designing the controller based on what buttons the ported games are going to require.  The layouts aren't patented, and this is a good thing because it enables people to go from one platform to another without too much confusion.

The Fire TV remote has this similar layout in the sense of "let's not re-invent everything just for the sake of being different" while actually being a specific design for the device for what they needed.  Note that other controls on the device for video and other features.

All in all, I find it to work very well, and I was able to jump into game play quite easily thanks to the familiarity of the controls.

It's funny how many people have been attacked, and vilified on here by saying the same thing about touch screen phones. Apple didn't take into consideration for gaming controls when it designed the iPhone/iPod Touch. Devs adjusted their game play. There are now more games than have ever existed for all gaming consoles combined.

This was Apple's chance to redesign the gaming controller. Instead they went with a 20 yr old design, and left the building of it to 3rd parties.

Leaving the UX to another company is indicative that Apple is uncomfortable that it's devices are used so much for gaming. I'm sure SJ wasn't too happy that the breakthrough device that they worked so hard to develop has become for many a gaming device.
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post #35 of 62

Why would I want to pay $140, just to play a few Android games?:no:

 

If I was in the market for a standalone game system, I'd just pick up an Xbox or a Playstation.

post #36 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Why would I want to pay $140, just to play a few Android games?1oyvey.gif

If I was in the market for a standalone game system, I'd just pick up an Xbox or a Playstation.

Yet people pay a lot more than that to play a few iOS games.
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #37 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post
Yet people pay a lot more than that to play a few iOS games.

 

I think that most people also do a lot of other things with their iOS devices. I know that gaming is only a small percentage of what I do on my iOS devices. 

 

iOS is also a stronger gaming platform than Android, since it has better games, more exclusive games, and more games that are actually made for a tablet and not a phone, and iOS is what developers usually want to focus on first.

post #38 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by mensmovement View Post

Some counterpoints.

1. Lots of people are bashing the controller as mediocre but comparing it to console controllers is unfair...
 

 

It COSTS MORE than either the XBox 360 controller OR PS3 controller. It is built to play games that are run on a TV-connected box. Amazon has had YEARS to study and copy those controllers. Yes, comparing it to less-expensive console controllers is absolutely fair and completely to be expected. Not sure if you're just trolling on this one.

 

2. Amazon will have hundreds of games available in May...
 

 

May is 2 weeks away.  They better get busy. Why didn't they just wait a couple of weeks and release the Fire TV with all of those games?

 

3. Fire TV is not a mature platform or product yet. It was redesigned several times because the execs did not like early versions and then released too early to get ahead of other product launches...

 

Uh-huh, and a well-placed source inside notoriously secretive Amazon told you this, right? You have no idea if this is true or not. Please don't present speculation as fact.

post #39 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Which makes it completely different, both in usability and in form.

It makes it very much PlayStation-like... but after using both Xbox and PS controllers, I disagree with usability argument. I never had a problem moving from one to the other. Difference is in ergonomics, not in usability.

End of the day, controller shape is dictated by our hands anatomy. Beside some artificial changes, space for originality is quite limited.
post #40 of 62
So how does it stack up to mirroring games from an iPhone or iPad to an Apple TV?
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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