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Microsoft launches $70/year Office 365 Personal for Mac, iPad

post #1 of 55
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Pricing on Microsoft's Office 365 service became a little more affordable for individual users on Tuesday, as the company launched a new "Personal" subscription plan priced at $69.99 per year.




The new
Office 365 Personal subscription includes access to the service through one Mac or PC, as well as one tablet, including Apple's iPad. Previously, the cheapest option was Office 365 Home, which is priced at $99.99 per year with a one-year commitment.

While the Home plan, which still remains, includes access on 5 Macs or PCs and 5 tablets, the new Personal subscription is limited to one of each. Both plans come with smartphone access, and the ability to access the online versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote.

The new Office 365 Personal plan also comes with offline storage, 27 gigabytes of online storage for one user, and 60 world minutes of calling per month to 60+ countries with Skype.



For those who don't want to commit to a full year, Office 365 Personal access can also be purchased for $6.99 per month, while the Home plan runs $9.99 per month.

Microsoft's industry leading Office suite debuted on Apple's iPad late last month. Word, Excel and PowerPoint are all free-to-download applications that come with the ability to view documents, while editing and saving requires a subscription to the Office 365 service.

Users can even subscribe to Office 365 through the official iPad applications, granting Apple its traditional 30 percent cut of all in-app and App Store purchases.

Downloads of Office for iPad hit 12 million units in the suite's first week of availability. The applications go head-to-head with Apple's own Pages, Numbers and Keynote for iOS.

As for the Mac, Microsoft has signaled that it is planning to release a new version for Apple's OS X platform later this year. The suite was last updated on the Mac in 2010, and subsequent updates have not arrived because Microsoft disbanded its Mac business unit soon after it launched.
post #2 of 55
I’ve got Office 2011 on my Mac. I’ve got Office on my iPad. I’ve got a One Drive account with 7GB free storage. Now comes the hard part. Do I take the last step and pluck down my $70?
post #3 of 55

So if $100 per year, every year, forever, for 5 computers and 5 iPads is too much, then $70 per year, every year, forever, for just 1 computer and 1 iPad is is reasonable?

 

Right.

post #4 of 55

More agressive, very good move. Only $70 to go.

 

 

 

Is that $83.88 per year?

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post #5 of 55
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #6 of 55
Nope. Still not going to pay a subscription to use software. To anyone. Ever.
post #7 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

I’ve got Office 2011 on my Mac. I’ve got Office on my iPad. I’ve got a One Drive account with 7GB free storage. Now comes the hard part. Do I take the last step and pluck down my $70?

 

The answer is no.

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post #8 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Nope. Still not going to pay a subscription to use software. To anyone. Ever.

 

Same here. That business model is ridiculous.

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post #9 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post
 

 

Same here. That business model is ridiculous.

Ridiculous for the consumers, not so much for a company looks for tons of money. I agree though, will be keeping my Office 2010 for as long as possible.

post #10 of 55

Office 2010 for my Windows systems, and Office 2011 on my iMac.  Zero monthly subscription fee.

While this (arguably) makes sense for businesses to keep their software current, for the personal consumer, I think it is borderline extortion that Microsoft thinks it's okay to charge a subscription fee to use something so essential as an office productivity suite.

All they're going to do is lose customers to companies (like Apple) that offer a paid to own model.

Lame.

post #11 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seankill View Post
 

Ridiculous for the consumers, not so much for a company looks for tons of money. I agree though, will be keeping my Office 2010 for as long as possible.

 

Of course I mean consumers - unfortunately, there are loads of benighted people out there willing to pay big money for a time-limited subscription...

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post #12 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seankill View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post

 

Same here. That business model is ridiculous.
Ridiculous for the consumers, not so much for a company looks for tons of money. I agree though, will be keeping my Office 2010 for as long as possible.

I fully agree. This lower price won't suddenly make the offer more attractive, and business purchases will continue, at whatever price. Well, at least large ones. I cannot believe MS thinks this will entice any consumer. Haven't even read the article, but I presume there's a refund for those who already bought the subscription at $99(?)
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post #13 of 55

Subscription software will make it essentially impossible for archivists and librarians, in 30 years, to read the files and archives created today. Because access to the software will be gone. Possibly even the company that previously sold subscriptions to it will be gone. Does Microsoft even acknowledge today that it once made a CP/M card for the Apple ][e?  They did, because I bought and still own one.  But that's hardware.  Suppose Deneba Systems had only sold it's monumental, game-changing graphics software CANVAS as a subscription. Many of us would be stuck: the company is gone, the new owner of the IP refuses to even offer the program for the Mac platform (where it was born). This is one reason some of us keep our PowerPC Macs and sometimes even run System 9 (an OS X upgrade was available but is very buggy).  Had this been subscription software, I'd have no access to my legacy graphics files.

 

So, I will write as dysamoria wrote: "Nope. Still not going to pay a subscription to use software. To anyone. Ever."

post #14 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post
 

Subscription software will make it essentially impossible for archivists and librarians, in 30 years, to read the files and archives created today. Because access to the software will be gone. Possibly even the company that previously sold subscriptions to it will be gone. Does Microsoft even acknowledge today that it once made a CP/M card for the Apple ][e?  They did, because I bought and still own one.  But that's hardware.  Suppose Deneba Systems had only sold it's monumental, game-changing graphics software CANVAS as a subscription. Many of us would be stuck: the company is gone, the new owner of the IP refuses to even offer the program for the Mac platform (where it was born). This is one reason some of us keep our PowerPC Macs and sometimes even run System 9 (an OS X upgrade was available but is very buggy).  Had this been subscription software, I'd have no access to my legacy graphics files.

 

So, I will write as dysamoria wrote: "Nope. Still not going to pay a subscription to use software. To anyone. Ever."

 

Exactly right. The subscription-based model is absolutely useless considering that software is always licensed, not sold - and that editing/reading capabilities will no longer be there once the company is gone.

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post #15 of 55
I am still not interested. iWork is a good and free alternative which I am familiar with. The subscription model is still a very bad idea, I already have a lot of subscriptions and I don't need more.
post #16 of 55
I dumped office and switched to Apple iWork apps several years ago. I can't recall a single instance where I had to go back to Office 2011 to edit or create a document. Apple's apps are so much more intuitive and easier to use.

My problem with MS Office has been that it gives life to the term Bloatware. For many years, Microsoft needed justification to sell those hundred dollar software upgrades every year or two. Their justification was always to add more features. What started out as a nifty little sports car evolved into a passenger sedan, then a station wagon, then a van, then a bus, and finally a tandem-axle cross country truck.

Those apps are loaded with features I never used, didn't understand, and simply added confusion (Think arrays, macros, table of contents, etc.). I'm sure there are some folks who actually use some of that stuff but it wouldn't be me.

Now they've somehow managed to make what was already a very bad deal even worse by converting to a subscription plan. This means they'll have their hand in your pocket all the time rather than just some of the time. No thanks, I'll continue to opt out.

The sad thing is that many (most?) Windows users actually seem to think Office is somehow desirable. They send me documents in Office formats all the time. I simply drag and drop them onto the corresponding Apple App and they open fine. If I modify or create a document in one of Apple's apps, it is very easy to export to an Office format for sending to a Windows user.

My Mac apps already automatically sync to my iPad.

I don't see any value in Microsoft's offer here.
post #17 of 55
Excellent.
Vedy good for enterprise users.
 
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post #18 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post
 

Subscription software will make it essentially impossible for archivists and librarians, in 30 years, to read the files and archives created today. Because access to the software will be gone. Possibly even the company that previously sold subscriptions to it will be gone. Does Microsoft even acknowledge today that it once made a CP/M card for the Apple ][e?  They did, because I bought and still own one.  But that's hardware.  Suppose Deneba Systems had only sold it's monumental, game-changing graphics software CANVAS as a subscription. Many of us would be stuck: the company is gone, the new owner of the IP refuses to even offer the program for the Mac platform (where it was born). This is one reason some of us keep our PowerPC Macs and sometimes even run System 9 (an OS X upgrade was available but is very buggy).  Had this been subscription software, I'd have no access to my legacy graphics files.

 

So, I will write as dysamoria wrote: "Nope. Still not going to pay a subscription to use software. To anyone. Ever."

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post
 

Exactly right. The subscription-based model is absolutely useless considering that software is always licensed, not sold - and that editing/reading capabilities will no longer be there once the company is gone.

 

Not a big deal.

 

Microsoft sells Office 2013 suites, which are the traditional one-time, non-subscription purchases. If you have the system to run the applications, there is no requirement to connect to some sort of active licensing server.

 

As long as Microsoft continues to sell standalone office suites, your handwringing is pointless.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post

Excellent.
Vedy good for enterprise users.
 

No, it's pretty irrelevant to enterprise users. Corporations purchase multiple licenses for their employees. This new offering is geared to individual users as it only activates the software for one Mac and one iPad.


Edited by mpantone - 4/15/14 at 11:52am
post #19 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

As long as Microsoft continues to sell standalone office suites, your handwringing is pointless.

 

Not handwringing.  Experience.  With other companies & products.

 

 

Your tautological argument is pointless.

post #20 of 55
Throw in a $100 iTunes gift card every year and I'm in!
post #21 of 55

So how does MS determine the difference between a real personal use verse the BYOD to work and using it for actual corporate work. Today more people use a personal ipad at work than a work supplied device.

post #22 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

Not a big deal.

 

Microsoft sells Office 2013 suites, which are the traditional one-time, non-subscription purchases. If you have the system to run the applications, there is no requirement to connect to some sort of active licensing server.

 

As long as Microsoft continues to sell standalone office suites, your handwringing is pointless.

 

You missed his point entirely.  The issue is with one retail model versus another.  Subscription versus purchase.  Microsoft, like Adobe before it, would like to go exclusively to a subscription model.  We can accept that, but if we do, then we run into problems down the road with being able to access old files.  This isn't an issue now because there are non-subscription apps that read these files.  But when new file formats come out that are subscription only, then we run into a problem down the road.

 

The solution to that problem is to persuade companies not to go to subscription-only models.  This persuasion is most effective by everyone simply not subscribing.  Microsoft and Adobe aren't in the business of archive restoring.  They don't care about this.  If you do, then it may be in your interest not to support the subscription model.

post #23 of 55
Incredibly bs pricing.
post #24 of 55

The best part about this is the 30% that goes into Apple's bank.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #25 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by macslut View Post
 

You missed his point entirely.  The issue is with one retail model versus another.  Subscription versus purchase.  Microsoft, like Adobe before it, would like to go exclusively to a subscription model.  We can accept that, but if we do, then we run into problems down the road with being able to access old files.  This isn't an issue now because there are non-subscription apps that read these files.  But when new file formats come out that are subscription only, then we run into a problem down the road.

You know, I bet at least one  or two people at Microsoft and Adobe reached that conclusion and discussed the matter.

 

You guys make it sound like only the AppleInsider genius forum commenters have thought about this.

 

It's not really an issue unless the situation actually comes up. I'm not losing any sleep over it. It's not a problem today.

 

I'm laughing because I have several PhotoCDs from the Nineties that are getting increasingly difficult to find compatible software. Yeah, I still have the original negatives & slides somewhere. 

post #26 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

Subscription software will make it essentially impossible for archivists and librarians, in 30 years, to read the files and archives created today. Because access to the software will be gone. Possibly even the company that previously sold subscriptions to it will be gone. Does Microsoft even acknowledge today that it once made a CP/M card for the Apple ][e?  They did, because I bought and still own one.  But that's hardware.  Suppose Deneba Systems had only sold it's monumental, game-changing graphics software CANVAS as a subscription. Many of us would be stuck: the company is gone, the new owner of the IP refuses to even offer the program for the Mac platform (where it was born). This is one reason some of us keep our PowerPC Macs and sometimes even run System 9 (an OS X upgrade was available but is very buggy).  Had this been subscription software, I'd have no access to my legacy graphics files.

So, I will write as dysamoria wrote: "Nope. Still not going to pay a subscription to use software. To anyone. Ever."

Microsoft has free viewing apps for most if not all of the office formats....
post #27 of 55
The subscription model might work for small business that can write off the cost of the subscription entirely rather than depreciating the value of software.
post #28 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

 

Not a big deal.

 

Microsoft sells Office 2013 suites, which are the traditional one-time, non-subscription purchases. If you have the system to run the applications, there is no requirement to connect to some sort of active licensing server.

 

As long as Microsoft continues to sell standalone office suites, your handwringing is pointless.

 

No, it's pretty irrelevant to enterprise users. Corporations purchase multiple licenses for their employees. This new offering is geared to individual users as it only activates the software for one Mac and one iPad.

 

Your response is irrelevant; we are talking about subscription-based software, not the ordinary offline Office suites (which we'd obviously prefer to pay for).

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post #29 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wovel View Post


Microsoft has free viewing apps for most if not all of the office formats....

 

As if viewing were the only thing we do with our files...

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post #30 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Nope. Still not going to pay a subscription to use software. To anyone. Ever.

 

 

Totally agree, good enough to repeat... ~~Nope. Still not going to pay a subscription to use software. To anyone. Ever.

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post #31 of 55

Why in the world would i piss away $84 USD a year on this when i can use Google Docs for free?

post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 
I'm laughing because I have several PhotoCDs from the Nineties that are getting increasingly difficult to find compatible software. Yeah, I still have the original negatives & slides somewhere. 

I had someone bring me a CD made in the 90s. Back then it was fashionable in the Mac OS 7 graphic design community to name your finished projects with an ƒ in front of the file name. Those files are completely useless now. Not OS X, Linux nor Windows can even read the directory off the CD and even crashed my Mac. I also remember those 3.5" optical diskettes that claimed that the data was good for 100 years. You can't even find anyone who has a drive to read it and there are no software drivers for modern OS either. 

 

 As far as subscriptions go, I feel if you are using the software professionally, then it probably costs less in the long run and it is better from the perspective that you never need to pay for an emergency upgrade when a colleague sends you a file you can't open. 

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post #33 of 55

I have had Office 2011 for 4 years now.. so at $70/year it would have been $280.  Pretty sure I did not pay that much. 


Edited by snova - 4/15/14 at 5:21pm
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post #34 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by brlawyer View Post

As if viewing were the only thing we do with our files...

iOS always previewed Office files.
post #35 of 55
"Software Subscription"? Nope. Not now, not ever.

M$ has at last lost me completely as a paying customer. I don't use Office anymore. Or Windows. I use (the free) Silverlight for Netflix, and that's it. What a sad testament.

Adobe lost my future business as well. Because of their subscription model, instead of upgrading Creative Suite as I would usually do, I'm instead milking my current version until it's no longer viable, and seeking alternatives in the meantime. Plenty of options are surfacing these days. I expect I'll have what I need by the time my last "non subscription" version of Photoshop/Illustrator, etc. no longer works (5 years down the road? 3 or so OSX versions later?)... I'm sure I'll manage...
post #36 of 55

The subscription model makes sense for businesses but for personal users, it's offensive.

post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post

Excellent.
Vedy good for enterprise users.

Oh really? Until one fine morning, you try to run "Subscription Word" and get the message, "oops, sorry, this software has been updated and is no longer supported on Windows XP. Keep your Office Suite running smoothly... Upgrade to Windows 8 today!"

 

Go have a look. Is Windows XP still supported by Office 365?

 

If so, it won't stay that way for much longer. Mark my words. If an enterprise "subscribes" to software like Office 365, it will lose the ability to decide its own timing for upgrades to software & OS... those terms will be dictated by M$.

post #38 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post
 

The subscription model makes sense for businesses but for personal users, it's offensive.

 

People keep chanting that "it makes sense for business" meme, but I don't see how that's true at all. How does the subscription model make better sense for companies? In my view it partially (or completely, depending) takes over control of a company's upgrade cycles. Which means you're in a very real sense taking some control of a company's budgets and expenditures.

 

For example: In tough times, a company may want to wait a year longer than usual to upgrade systems enterprise-wide. This model doesn't allow for controlled expenditures like that at all. It converts all those expenses/options into an ongoing fixed cost which you MUST abide or lose the software altogether. How is that better for a company? I don't see it...

post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

A coronal mass ejection will make it essentially impossible for archivists and librarians, in 30 years, to read the files and archives created today. Because all electronic records will be toast.

Fixed that for you . . .
post #40 of 55
Thanks, but no thanks.
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