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Traffic from Apple's unannounced iOS 8, OS X 10.10 remains steady ahead of WWDC 2014

post #1 of 63
Thread Starter 
Testing of Apple's anticipated next-generation operating systems -- iOS 8 and OS X 10.10 -- continues along at a steady clip, new traffic data shows, ahead of the upcoming Worldwide Developers Conference, where both products are expected to be unveiled.




AppleInsider has been tracking traffic it sees from the next major versions of iOS and OS X, keeping an eye on trends as WWDC approaches its June 2 kickoff. While traffic from both Apple's mobile and desktop-class operating systems was steadily growing through late 2013, it's largely flattened out over the last month, traffic logs show.

In a somewhat interesting pattern, traffic from devices running iOS 8 was largely steady regardless of the day of the week, with only small drop-offs on weekends. Macs running OS X 10.10, however, saw a significant decline in visits on weekends, reflecting the fact that those machines are probably used mostly at work.

Traffic from Macs running OS X 10.10 was also higher than iOS 8 on peak days.




The data suggests that Apple is hard at work testing out the next-generation versions of its iOS and OS X platforms, both of which are expected to be announced at an anticipated June 2 WWDC keynote. Apple took the same stage in San Francisco last year to officially unveil iOS 7 and OS X 10.9 Mavericks to its developer community and the public at large.

In its WWDC 2014 announcement, Apple did reveal that the company plans to show off its "latest advances in iOS and OS X," stopping short of admitting that full-fledged point-zero releases will be shown off.
post #2 of 63
Always fun to see what is next.
post #3 of 63
@ tookieman2013

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post #4 of 63
Mavericks was quite an incremental update, except you count the addition of two apps (maps & iBooks) as real OS extensions. Some further OS expansion would in my opinion be tighter cloud integration. Another possibility is a more extensive UI overhaul and more similarities to iOS. I personally find it confusing that Contacts, Mail, Safari, etc. icons are different on OS X and iOS.
post #5 of 63

Hopefully they'll have some sort of variation or improvement on widgets or continuously letting apps run on a portion of the screen in iOS8.  Assuming they are releasing a bigger screen phone they need to take advantage of what you can actually do with more screen real estate.  Simply being able to cram 50 icons on the screen instead of 20 would just make for clutter.

post #6 of 63
Quote:
In a somewhat interesting pattern, traffic from devices running iOS 8 was largely steady regardless of the day of the week, with only small drop-offs on weekends. Macs running OS X 10.10, however, saw a significant decline in visits on weekends, reflecting the fact that those machines are probably used mostly at work.

Or one could say that the Mac OS guys have their OS fairly well debugged and the iOS guys are on a crash program to get the bugs out. I find it highly unlikely that they have that many iOS devices out in the wild right now.
post #7 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacApfel View Post

Mavericks was quite an incremental update, except you count the addition of two apps (maps & iBooks) as real OS extensions. Some further OS expansion would in my opinion be tighter cloud integration. Another possibility is a more extensive UI overhaul and more similarities to iOS. I personally find it confusing that Contacts, Mail, Safari, etc. icons are different on OS X and iOS.
Well if 9to5Mac is correct, the big feature of OSX this year will be the UI redesign. I don't expect OSX to look exactly like iOS but I won't be surprised to see icons looking more like their iOS counterparts and any last vestiges of faux leather, felt, etc. removed. Peter Cohen made a good observation on the last iMore podcast. He works for an Apple reseller and said a lot of people that are new to the Mac are coming from iOS, so making elements of the UI more similar just makes sense.
post #8 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


Well if 9to5Mac is correct, the big feature of OSX this year will be the UI redesign. I don't expect OSX to look exactly like iOS but I won't be surprised to see icons looking more like their iOS counterparts and any last vestiges of faux leather, felt, etc. removed. Peter Cohen made a good observation on the last iMore podcast. He works for an Apple reseller and said a lot of people that are new to the Mac are coming from iOS, so making elements of the UI more similar just makes sense.

I also don't expect OS X to look like iOS. Although, in principal it is almost possible with Launchpad and full screen apps. At the moment it would feel forced to unify OS X and iOS. If there is a point in the future, when a separation of OS X and iOS feels forced, a unification will come. But this day still appears quite far away.

post #9 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacApfel View Post

Mavericks was quite an incremental update,
What are you talking about here? Mavericks was a massive update and a great step forward for users. Beyond that what do you really expect from an operating system?
Quote:

except you count the addition of two apps (maps & iBooks) as real OS extensions.
Apps are not the operating system. The operating system was enhanced significantly, spend sometime with the developer tools and actually develop an understanding of what has happened with Mac OS over the years.
Quote:
Some further OS expansion would in my opinion be tighter cloud integration.
For the most part the could is a joke and anti user. I don't see excessive could integration as being a big help for most users. ICloud especially gets far to many things wrong, as such I don't see it ever being a huge success unless Apple can significantly overhaul the facility to make it more useful. In a more general sense there might be a few could based features worth adding but Mac OS needs a different approach than what is seen in some of the iOS solutions. The perfect example here is Siri which could be useful on the Mac if the IA was actually running on the Mac so that traffic to the web is minimized. However such a Mac Siri would not be seen as a could services so much as a Mac service that can intelligently talk to the cloud.
Quote:
Another possibility is a more extensive UI overhaul and more similarities to iOS. I personally find it confusing that Contacts, Mail, Safari, etc. icons are different on OS X and iOS.

I'm not saying it would not hurt but come on it isn't that confusing. I've never had trouble finding Safari, Mail, Contacts or anything else on both systems. I would expect some interface tweaking as honestly software is never done, however I don't expect a MS like abortion of an update.
post #10 of 63
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post #11 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


What are you talking about here? Mavericks was a massive update and a great step forward for users. Beyond that what do you really expect from an operating system?

I'm not saying it would not hurt but come on it isn't that confusing. I've never had trouble finding Safari, Mail, Contacts or anything else on both systems. I would expect some interface tweaking as honestly software is never done, however I don't expect a MS like abortion of an update.

 

You might be right from a developer perspective. So no argument here. I was talking from a user perspective. There I can't see a big difference to 10.8. It's not a complaint, more an observation. As such more UI consistency between iOS and OS X is desirable, e.g. icons.

post #12 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

Hopefully they'll have some sort of variation or improvement on widgets or continuously letting apps run on a portion of the screen in iOS8.  
I don't think Widgets are needed. I'd rather see something like picture in picture, where I could bounce between two apps relatively efficiently and at the very least get a summary display in the shrunken app. However you have a real problem with screen real estate and frankly I prefer the current app switching most of the time. Even on my iPad there really isn't enough room to have two apps on screen. This especially when the keyboard pops up.
Quote:
Assuming they are releasing a bigger screen phone they need to take advantage of what you can actually do with more screen real estate.  Simply being able to cram 50 icons on the screen instead of 20 would just make for clutter.
I think that is a matter of opinion. One thing that I'd like to see though is an always there search bar. I'd also want to see a more substantial status bar or at least give us the option. For the status bar I'm primarily interested in larger text for the clock and more display options for that clock. I wouldn't be surprised to see more icons but I think Apple can make better use of the display, probably in ways we haven't thought about yet.
post #13 of 63

I don't mind if OS X gets a flat look, the original Mac OS was flat. It's the transparency I don't like, they think it puts content first, but it just makes things hard to read and cluttered looking.

post #14 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post
 

I don't mind if OS X gets a flat look, the original Mac OS was flat. It's the transparency I don't like, they think it puts content first, but it just makes things hard to read and cluttered looking.

I couldn't agree more: transparency, especially on iOS, is nothing but a distraction. Windows had transparency in Vista and I thought that was one of the worst UI decisions.

post #15 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Or one could say that the Mac OS guys have their OS fairly well debugged and the iOS guys are on a crash program to get the bugs out. I find it highly unlikely that they have that many iOS devices out in the wild right now.

With less than a month and a half until WWDC, it is rather likely that there are many devices running iOS 8 in the wild. Naturally, most (if not all) of the devices would be existing hardware (iPhone 5s, iPhone 5, iPhone 5c, iPad Air, iPad mini Retina, etc.) right now rather than beta hardware since we're presumably still about five months away from a new handset release.

 

A casual passerby would not be able to tell that the Apple employee was running beta software on their device. If the Apple employee went to his/her kid's soccer game and shot some video with an iPhone or took a picture of their cappuccino, how would someone be able to tell?

 

Do you look over people's shoulders to see what OS their phone is running? I don't. The only time I can tell is if I'm standing next to someone at a bar or on public transit.

post #16 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


What are you talking about here? Mavericks was a massive update and a great step forward for users. Beyond that what do you really expect from an operating system?
Apps are not the operating system. The operating system was enhanced significantly, spend sometime with the developer tools and actually develop an understanding of what has happened with Mac OS over the years.
For the most part the could is a joke and anti user. I don't see excessive could integration as being a big help for most users. ICloud especially gets far to many things wrong, as such I don't see it ever being a huge success unless Apple can significantly overhaul the facility to make it more useful. In a more general sense there might be a few could based features worth adding but Mac OS needs a different approach than what is seen in some of the iOS solutions. The perfect example here is Siri which could be useful on the Mac if the IA was actually running on the Mac so that traffic to the web is minimized. However such a Mac Siri would not be seen as a could services so much as a Mac service that can intelligently talk to the cloud.
I'm not saying it would not hurt but come on it isn't that confusing. I've never had trouble finding Safari, Mail, Contacts or anything else on both systems. I would expect some interface tweaking as honestly software is never done, however I don't expect a MS like abortion of an update.

 

I agree with the first 1/2 of what you said. People forget about compressed memory, App Nap, coallesced timers,  adding a whole new mode of working with multiple monitors, tags, etc. 

 

iCloud already is a huge success. Bookmark and keychain sharing between Macs and iOS devices is awesome. The same is true for document sharing between devices. Granted, core data syncing was rough when first released, but it has improved dramatically since then. Apple still has some work left ahead of them. Their current implementation of file management iOS-style feels incomplete. In addition, they don't have a good handle on generic file types such as images. I don't think iCloud syncing is going anywhere anytime soon.

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post #17 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacApfel View Post

You might be right from a developer perspective. So no argument here. I was talking from a user perspective. There I can't see a big difference to 10.8. It's not a complaint, more an observation. As such more UI consistency between iOS and OS X is desirable, e.g. icons.

Remember these are yearly and now free updates. Getting changes isn't like changes in Windows where they take a couple years to do a point update.

They might be doing a tick/tock method where one year they concentrate more on the sub-system and the next on the UI. That gives each a couple years to be ironed out before the next set of big changes.

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post #18 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacApfel View Post

You might be right from a developer perspective. So no argument here.
I really like Mavericks so maybe I come off as a promoter but it go a lot of things right and has allowed me to keep an old MBP running another year.
Quote:
I was talking from a user perspective. There I can't see a big difference to 10.8. It's not a complaint, more an observation.
I think that is the whole point you aren't suppose to see a big difference. Significant parts of the operating system where upgraded or improved yet there was little app breakage, performance improved and so did stability.

Apps are a different story and a few new ones came with Mavericks, but Apps aren't really the operating system. Sure Apple ships Safari, Mail and a bunch of others but you aren't stuck with them and their particular gloss.

More importantly to me, I'd rather see Apple keep thing consistent across operating system releases rather than to suffer through a botched attempt to improve things like Windows 8 tried to do.
Quote:
As such more UI consistency between iOS and OS X is desirable, e.g. icons.
I don't consider iCons to be part of the OS either, they are part of the app as such Apple can do whatever it wants with app icons anytime it chooses. However they need to be careful here because I've had installed user apps upgrade their app icon during a modest don't release and frankly it sucks if the change is dramatic. The problem is once you get use to an icon it becomes muscle memory when accessing it. If I have to retrain myself to use common features of Mac OS then I have to ask is it worth it. Especially when some of Apples icons are damn near classics.

Some designs are classics, take for example the Hobart/Kitchen Aid mixers that have had the same basic mechanical design for years. Sometimes it just makes more sense to keep a familiar and reliable design around instead of screwing with it. This is how I feel about much of the Mac OS interface, nothing substantially better has come around so why screw with it. Sure tweak it here and there but let's not screw it up like MS did with Windows. The time to drop familiarity is when there is a substantial advancement to be had, I see this happening when Mac OS can be extended with AI technology.
post #19 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Beardsley View Post

I agree with the first 1/2 of what you said. People forget about compressed memory, App Nap, coallesced timers,  adding a whole new mode of working with multiple monitors, tags, etc. 
Yes a very significant update of what an OS is all about. The surprising thing to me is that they pulled all this off with little breakage.
Quote:
iCloud already is a huge success. Bookmark and keychain sharing between Macs and iOS devices is awesome. The same is true for document sharing between devices.
Book marks and Keychain works well but I really have a significant hate for the way document sharing or handling works with iCloud. In fact considering Apples uniquely skilled engineers I have to wonder how they managed to screw up documents so much, especially on the iOS side of things.
Quote:
Granted, core data syncing was rough when first released, but it has improved dramatically since then. Apple still has some work left ahead of them. Their current implementation of file management iOS-style feels incomplete.
In my mind it is completely broken. There is no file browser app, no common store for sharing data across apps, no standard file navigator for apps to call upon and I have no idea which files are significant storage users. It is in effect so incomplete that at times I just avoid using iOS apps. Hell I can't even save an MP3 file from Safari.
Quote:
In addition, they don't have a good handle on generic file types such as images.
Exactly! It truly sucks the way iOS works with what are common file types. Some things really boggle the mind, like the inability to save a spreadsheet from Safari.
Quote:
I don't think iCloud syncing is going anywhere anytime soon.

No it won't because that is about the only thing that works well in IOS and Mac OS. Beyond syncing though iOS is extremely frustrating to work with.
post #20 of 63

I hope that 3D dock will be GONE.

post #21 of 63
I think my high school and undergraduate math teachers taught wrong, especially regarding decimals. Can someone explain how 10.10 is a different version number than 10.1? I am really missing something.
post #22 of 63
It's probably android users. Aren't they supposedly always using Safari's user-agent strings? Like the apologists suggest? 1wink.gif

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post #23 of 63
Quote:
I think my high school and undergraduate math teachers taught wrong, especially regarding decimals. Can someone explain how 10.10 is a different version number than 10.1? I am really missing something. 

Just wait until 10.10.1 or 10.10.2 and your issue will be gone and your math teachers will still be right.

post #24 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

Just wait until 10.10.1 or 10.10.2 and your issue will be gone and your math teachers will still be right.

I'm still confused. Isn't 10.10.1 fundamentally the same as 10.1.1, and 10.10.2 the same as 10.1.2? Either I am really missing something, or someone is trying to pull the wool over my eyes. Would someone please explain how the numbers are different?
post #25 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I don't mind if OS X gets a flat look, the original Mac OS was flat. It's the transparency I don't like, they think it puts content first, but it just makes things hard to read and cluttered looking.

The following concept from last year has been posted in a few places:

http://www.ajambrosino.com/os-x-11-concept/

That guy currently works at Bertrand Serlet's company Up There as a design intern.

The concept shown there is far too squared off, not enough roundness but it gives an idea of the possible style. Microsoft does everything squared.

This is how Microsoft does flat:



and this is how Apple does flat:



You can see the sharp edges in the Microsoft one are much less friendly and approachable than the Apple one. The same extends to their hardware:



You can see right through the UI, Microsoft squares off keyboard keys, input boxes, panels:



http://www.folklore.org/StoryView.py?story=Round_Rects_Are_Everywhere.txt

The system font in OS X can be switched for either Helvetica Neue or Avenir. I'd hope for a 2D Dock again. The whole UI style can't translate over such as zooming in and out of icons because apps aren't all fullscreen but a lot of the same style can come over. I don't really like OS X's unevenly shaped app icons, the rounded rectangle icons are much more evenly spaced and cleaner looking. Dock icons get the same width anyway and it looks messy when icons with vastly different image widths are next to each other.

They already use the iOS 7 style transparency in the stacks panel. It blurs the content behind it. iOS 7 really took it from OS X.

More of a style unification should be expected:

http://bgr.com/2014/04/09/apple-ios-design-jony-ive/

"Greg Christie, a longtime Apple engineer who spearheaded the design of the iPhone’s slide-to-unlock feature, is apparently leaving Apple after repeated clashes with Apple senior vice president of design Jony Ive. 9to5Mac’s sources say that Christie’s departure as Apple’s human interface vice president means that Ive has now taken complete control over the design of iOS and that this represents a major shakeup to the iOS design team.

So what does this mean for the future of iOS design? Well, 9to5Mac’s sources say that Ive actually circumvented Christie during the iOS 7 design process, which means the changes that Apple made to its mobile operating system last year are definitely here to stay. 9to5Mac also says that this portends big changes for OS X, which “will be revamped with a flatter look that loses the textures that Christie utilized to make the iPhone the most popular gadget on the planet.”

So it looks like skeuomorphism is completely out at Apple and the flatness favored by Ive is in for the foreseeable future. It will certainly be interesting to see how this plays out in the coming months."

Losing the slide to unlock was a large change. I quite liked the original slide to unlock and could have been made flatter but the new implementation has its benefits too.

In some ways, I think the whole desktop functionality needs a modern redesign, not just style. I wish there was a way to get rid of overlapping windows and menus without sacrificing the efficiency. Column view in the Finder is great but cluttered and wastes a lot of space. It would be nice to have a single window where columns are new views and everything just goes vertically but then there's the issue of having active contexts for commands and space for list views.

I don't think it can be done overnight. I suspect we'll see gradual changes with each iteration so that people become accustomed to any functional changes. One thing that would be nice is a control panel like in iOS to be able to play music without opening iTunes. It can read the iTunes library and playlists separately from iTunes and iTunes wouldn't need a minimized UI any more and the control panel would take over.

I wonder if the App Stores will converge too so that it's possible to buy an app for all 3 devices at once and sync them easily.
post #26 of 63
I am expecting to hear that OS X is running on ARM in the redesigned MacBook using the A8 processor.
post #27 of 63
[quote name="wizard69" url="/t/178677/traffic-from-apples-unannounced-ios-8-os-x-10-10-remains-steady-ahead-of-wwdc-2014#post_[/quote]
I couldn't agree more with everything you posted. Spot on.
post #28 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital_Guy View Post


I'm still confused. Isn't 10.10.1 fundamentally the same as 10.1.1, and 10.10.2 the same as 10.1.2? Either I am really missing something, or someone is trying to pull the wool over my eyes. Would someone please explain how the numbers are different?

Numbers with 2 decimal points can be quite confusing.

post #29 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital_Guy View Post

I'm still confused. Isn't 10.10.1 fundamentally the same as 10.1.1, and 10.10.2 the same as 10.1.2? Either I am really missing something, or someone is trying to pull the wool over my eyes. Would someone please explain how the numbers are different?

Since when are you allowed to delete trailing digits in a whole number? I'd think it was clear that a system that can use two or more periods (as well as letters) are not using them as decimal points like in math but as simple separators; so I honestly don't understand why people have such a hard time with using a period as separator the way it's commonly used with phone numbers (800.555.1212) or dates (2014.04.18) but can't wrap their head around for it a version number. It boggles my mind even more that no one ever removes the trailing zero from the first ten but they want to remove it from the second ten.
Edited by SolipsismX - 4/18/14 at 4:17pm

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post #30 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital_Guy View Post


I'm still confused. Isn't 10.10.1 fundamentally the same as 10.1.1, and 10.10.2 the same as 10.1.2? Either I am really missing something, or someone is trying to pull the wool over my eyes. Would someone please explain how the numbers are different?

 

OK I'll take the bait. They aren't decimals, the dots are place separators. Always have been, always will be. OS number <dot> major version number <dot> minor update number.

 

We have spent some time here drilling this very obvious truth into people. So let's not revive this again. Please.

 

Edit : {Oops I see I was beaten to the annoyed response by Soli.)


Edited by Eluard - 4/18/14 at 4:44pm
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post #31 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by troberts View Post

I am expecting to hear that OS X is running on ARM in the redesigned MacBook using the A8 processor.

If that is true, I don't see that product coming out until the Fall.

post #32 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


They might be doing a tick/tock method where one year they concentrate more on the sub-system and the next on the UI. That gives each a couple years to be ironed out before the next set of big changes.

There's absolutely no indication of apple doing any sort of tick/tock cycle in OS X whatsoever, besides you are clearly misapplying the term here.
post #33 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

What are you talking about here? Mavericks was a massive update and a great step forward for users. Beyond that what do you really expect from an operating system?
Apps are not the operating system. The operating system was enhanced significantly, spend sometime with the developer tools and actually develop an understanding of what has happened with Mac OS over the years.
For the most part the could is a joke and anti user. I don't see excessive could integration as being a big help for most users. ICloud especially gets far to many things wrong, as such I don't see it ever being a huge success unless Apple can significantly overhaul the facility to make it more useful. In a more general sense there might be a few could based features worth adding but Mac OS needs a different approach than what is seen in some of the iOS solutions. The perfect example here is Siri which could be useful on the Mac if the IA was actually running on the Mac so that traffic to the web is minimized. However such a Mac Siri would not be seen as a could services so much as a Mac service that can intelligently talk to the cloud.
I'm not saying it would not hurt but come on it isn't that confusing. I've never had trouble finding Safari, Mail, Contacts or anything else on both systems. I would expect some interface tweaking as honestly software is never done, however I don't expect a MS like abortion of an update.

I appreciate that you may be talking from a developer's perspective, but I don't share your denigration of iCloud. My experience of it for the past year has been excellent. It certainly had its share of bugs in the early days, but I find it very reliable now.
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post #34 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

I appreciate that you may be talking from a developer's perspective, but I don't share your denigration of iCloud. My experience of it for the past year has been excellent. It certainly had its share of bugs in the early days, but I find it very reliable now.

I agree. I don't think @wizard69 knows just how much Mac OS X and iOS use iCloud for syncing and storage these days. I think it's quite impressive yet I still wish it did more.

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post #35 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Yes a very significant update of what an OS is all about. The surprising thing to me is that they pulled all this off with little breakage.
Book marks and Keychain works well but I really have a significant hate for the way document sharing or handling works with iCloud. In fact considering Apples uniquely skilled engineers I have to wonder how they managed to screw up documents so much, especially on the iOS side of things.
In my mind it is completely broken. There is no file browser app, no common store for sharing data across apps, no standard file navigator for apps to call upon and I have no idea which files are significant storage users. It is in effect so incomplete that at times I just avoid using iOS apps. Hell I can't even save an MP3 file from Safari.
Exactly! It truly sucks the way iOS works with what are common file types. Some things really boggle the mind, like the inability to save a spreadsheet from Safari.
No it won't because that is about the only thing that works well in IOS and Mac OS. Beyond syncing though iOS is extremely frustrating to work with.

I'm the exact opposite to you. If I see that an app has iCloud, then that is a selling point. In fact, I often will choose an app over similar ones because it has iCloud.

I have a finance app that uses iCloud, and it works flawlessly and quickly. No problem with core data sync there.

You seem to have a fundamental problem with the way iOS works. I get the feeling that you want to force the pc traditional layout onto it. Let it go.
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post #36 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital_Guy View Post

I'm still confused. Isn't 10.10.1 fundamentally the same as 10.1.1, and 10.10.2 the same as 10.1.2? Either I am really missing something, or someone is trying to pull the wool over my eyes. Would someone please explain how the numbers are different?

You're quite correct; it's just a quirk of version numbering used in software. And I agree that it's silly and confusing.

I wonder whether 10.10 is definite, or whether there's a possibility it might be 11 or 13.
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post #37 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

The following concept from last year has been posted in a few places:

http://www.ajambrosino.com/os-x-11-concept/

That guy currently works at Bertrand Serlet's company Up There as a design intern.

The concept shown there is far too squared off, not enough roundness but it gives an idea of the possible style. Microsoft does everything squared.

This is how Microsoft does flat:



and this is how Apple does flat:



You can see the sharp edges in the Microsoft one are much less friendly and approachable than the Apple one. The same extends to their hardware:



You can see right through the UI, Microsoft squares off keyboard keys, input boxes, panels:



http://www.folklore.org/StoryView.py?story=Round_Rects_Are_Everywhere.txt

The system font in OS X can be switched for either Helvetica Neue or Avenir. I'd hope for a 2D Dock again. The whole UI style can't translate over such as zooming in and out of icons because apps aren't all fullscreen but a lot of the same style can come over. I don't really like OS X's unevenly shaped app icons, the rounded rectangle icons are much more evenly spaced and cleaner looking. Dock icons get the same width anyway and it looks messy when icons with vastly different image widths are next to each other.

They already use the iOS 7 style transparency in the stacks panel. It blurs the content behind it. iOS 7 really took it from OS X.

More of a style unification should be expected:

http://bgr.com/2014/04/09/apple-ios-design-jony-ive/

"Greg Christie, a longtime Apple engineer who spearheaded the design of the iPhone’s slide-to-unlock feature, is apparently leaving Apple after repeated clashes with Apple senior vice president of design Jony Ive. 9to5Mac’s sources say that Christie’s departure as Apple’s human interface vice president means that Ive has now taken complete control over the design of iOS and that this represents a major shakeup to the iOS design team.

So what does this mean for the future of iOS design? Well, 9to5Mac’s sources say that Ive actually circumvented Christie during the iOS 7 design process, which means the changes that Apple made to its mobile operating system last year are definitely here to stay. 9to5Mac also says that this portends big changes for OS X, which “will be revamped with a flatter look that loses the textures that Christie utilized to make the iPhone the most popular gadget on the planet.”

So it looks like skeuomorphism is completely out at Apple and the flatness favored by Ive is in for the foreseeable future. It will certainly be interesting to see how this plays out in the coming months."

Losing the slide to unlock was a large change. I quite liked the original slide to unlock and could have been made flatter but the new implementation has its benefits too.

In some ways, I think the whole desktop functionality needs a modern redesign, not just style. I wish there was a way to get rid of overlapping windows and menus without sacrificing the efficiency. Column view in the Finder is great but cluttered and wastes a lot of space. It would be nice to have a single window where columns are new views and everything just goes vertically but then there's the issue of having active contexts for commands and space for list views.

I don't think it can be done overnight. I suspect we'll see gradual changes with each iteration so that people become accustomed to any functional changes. One thing that would be nice is a control panel like in iOS to be able to play music without opening iTunes. It can read the iTunes library and playlists separately from iTunes and iTunes wouldn't need a minimized UI any more and the control panel would take over.

I wonder if the App Stores will converge too so that it's possible to buy an app for all 3 devices at once and sync them easily.

Pretty good post. I share your views on overhauling the whole design. I would like to see things gliding much more. The use of the Dissolve transition in iPhoto could be transferred to many things with pleasing effect. Smoother transitions everywhere, like reading. When jumping pages in Safari, for instance, I would much prefer a gentle dissolve rather than a scroll.
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post #38 of 63
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Since when are you allowed to delete trailing digits in a whole number? I'd think it was clear that a system that can use two or more periods (as well as letters) are not using them as decimal points like in math but as simple separators; so I honestly don't understand why people have such a hard time with using a period as separator the way it's commonly used with phone numbers (800.555.1212) or dates (2014.04.18) but can't wrap their head around for it a version number. It boggles my mind even more that no one ever removes the trailing zero from the first ten but they want to remove it from the second ten.

I think both the examples you cite are unclear. Using full stops in phone numbers and dates is confusing. We don't use them in England.

And the thrust of digital guy's complaint is sound. In maths, 10.1 is the same as 10.10 or 10.1000000, so it's not intuitive to go from 10.9 to 10.10, as you would always round it to 10.1.

Edit: to use a more accurate maths example, to go from 10.09 to 10.1. Or 10.9 to 11. No need for 11.0!
Edited by Benjamin Frost - 4/19/14 at 7:51am
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post #39 of 63
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I agree. I don't think @wizard69 knows just how much Mac OS X and iOS use iCloud for syncing and storage these days. I think it's quite impressive yet I still wish it did more.

Looks as though they're finally bringing Preview to iOS. It's currently annoying that PDFs in iBooks don't sync via iCloud. Presumably, Preview will become the way to do it.
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post #40 of 63
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Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

I think both the examples you cite are unclear. Using full stops in phone numbers and dates is confusing. We don't use them in England.

And the thrust of digital guy's complaint is sound. In maths, 10.1 is the same as 10.10 or 10.1000000, so it's not intuitive to go from 10.9 to 10.10, as you would always round it to 10.1.

1) How are they unclear? If you saw those would you not recognize the one as a US phone number and the other as a date?

2) It's not sound because this is not math. There are always an infinite number of .0's at the end as noted by 10.9.2 having a .2 after 10.9. If this was math it would be impossible as there is a single period (or comma, depending on your country/culture) used to separate whole from fractional integers. Again, if this was math you couldn't have multiple periods — unless you reverse the period and comma usage which would then mean they are thousands separators — or use letters as oft seen in version numbers.

3) Can you honestly not tell why Adobe Flash's current version of 13.0.0.201 is not a legal value used in math or why the letters b for Beta or f for Final or simpy any incremental letter can't be used for software versioning.

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