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$899 MacBook Air taps Apple into massive $63B-per-year notebook market - Page 2

post #41 of 65

This sestewart guy MUST be a joke poster. It's scary those can be the actual, genuine thoughts of a sane human being. 

 

"Single-point of failure"? Are you fucking for real? I guess notebooks should have redundant motherboards, CPUS, SSDs. screens, bluetooth and wifi receivers, touchpads, keybaords, and ports- cause all those things can fail. Why stop at 2? Why not 3 of each? You never know, right? 

 

I can't fucking believe you're referring to "single point of failure" on mobile products. These are not spaceships or planes. You're not gonna have redundant systems and hardware. It makes absolutely no financial, manufacturing, or physical sense. I've owned multiple macs and I've never had a NIC die on me. Does not seem like a common enough situation to require "redundant" options. Your scenarios are absolutely laughable, as is your logic. 


Edited by Slurpy - 4/30/14 at 10:30am
post #42 of 65
Originally Posted by sestewart View Post

Who's really stuck in the past?

 

You.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #43 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by sestewart View Post

The price point for a plastic, bare bones mac should be 500-600$. Yet Apple still thinks they can be a PC competitor by having a high priced product, and then take everything out of it that people use daily. Currently, only ONE Macbook product comes with an ethernet port! IF everything's supposed to be cloud based, I would like to hard wire my Mac for streaming movies without the lag of wireless due to interference. Is it really that costly to include a gigabit ethernet port on a computer these days??

Except Apple doesn't seem to think that a plastic, bare bones mac needs to be offered. Not at $500 or anything else.

 

You assume that Apple intends to be a "PC competitor", which I suppose would predicate meeting typical hardware and software specs. Apple's more successful offering what they figure that users will want to use, and if it competes with PCs in general, that's cool. But it's not necessary.

 

Most users will have no use at all for an ethernet port, why should they pay for adding one to the design? Those who do want to add the ports can do it with a Thunderbolt adapter, if not a USB equivalent.

post #44 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post
 

No, MacBook Air = Netbook. Call it what you want, but its just a simple netbook. I know this pisses people off and I'm an idiot, but really thats all it is, especially the 11" MBA. 

With the subtle difference that it's actually a usable machine, without most of the disadvantages and compromises of netbooks (the which pretty much everyone else has quit making).

post #45 of 65
I hope we see Apple switch the MacBook Air and the Mac mini to ARM A7 CPUs.
I also hope we see Apple tap Intel to manufacture these ARM CPUs.
This would hopefully allow Apple to
1) lower the price of their consumer Macs
2) pave the way to eliminating Samsung as a CPU supplier
3) bring more manufacturing back to the USA.
post #46 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

This sestewart guy MUST be a joke poster. It's scary those can be the actual, genuine thoughts of a sane human being. 

"Single-point of failure"? Are you fucking for real? I guess notebooks should have redundant motherboards, CPUS, SSDs. screens, bluetooth and wifi receivers, touchpads, keybaords, and ports- cause all those things can fail. Why stop at 2? Why not 3 of each? You never know, right? 

I can't fucking believe you're referring to "single point of failure" on mobile products. These are not spaceships or planes. You're not gonna have redundant systems and hardware. It makes absolutely no financial, manufacturing, or physical sense. I've owned multiple macs and I've never had a NIC die on me. Does not seem like a common enough situation to require "redundant" options. Your scenarios are absolutely laughable, as is your logic. 

Of course, we do need backup solutions. But other than that, other than professionally, it generally not a problem.
post #47 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post

I hope we see Apple switch the MacBook Air and the Mac mini to ARM A7 CPUs.
I also hope we see Apple tap Intel to manufacture these ARM CPUs.
This would hopefully allow Apple to
1) lower the price of their consumer Macs
2) pave the way to eliminating Samsung as a CPU supplier
3) bring more manufacturing back to the USA.

Impossible!
post #48 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

Instead of Apple having 95% of PC sales above $1,000, they will now have 95% of PC sales above $900.

 

Just that little bit of creep downward will terrify everyone else, but it’s not a market destroyer.

15" tends to be a very popular notebook size. Apple's sales are presumably more concentrated around the 13" size. They now have a viable (not ideal given the 128GB ssd  but still viable) 13" option below $1000, which may have been the primary goal.

post #49 of 65
Quote:
Is it really that costly to include a gigabit ethernet port on a computer these days?

I always find comments that imply an exclusion is due to cost without considering any other factors amusing.

Quote:
The amount of trolling on AI amazes me. 

LOL Calling someone a troll for informing of a Mac that is sold in the price range you requested is ludicrous.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

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post #50 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post

I hope we see Apple switch the MacBook Air and the Mac mini to ARM A7 CPUs.

Why wouldn't you want this year's ARM chip?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #51 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phone-UI-Guy View Post

Um, wasn't the MacBook Air already in this segment at $999?

If anything, the real story is that they now have two models (11" and 13") in this segment. Not to mention that the price drop was on all models. So they brought down the 256GB SSD models to $1,099 and $1,199. It will be interesting to see how the price mix changes as people move up Market to the Mac.

The price is faily competitive considering a Sony with a much smaller SSD goes for around $700. Suspect that they will continue to drive sales upward with this price drop. It really looks like Apple is going after market share here.
post #52 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Why would it terrify anyone? Ten percent is a nice drop, but it's not so much that people are suddenly going to think that Airs are cheap.

Cheap no but much more competitive pricing. These machine could be a big draw for people looking at similar hardware from other manufactures.
post #53 of 65
Or you could just say WiFi doesn't work that well compared to wire Ethernet. Of course dozens will chime in telling you how well it works for them which may be true but if you are working with lots of data it is slow and unreliable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sestewart View Post

Suppose

Well, OK.. what happens with your single point of failure wireless NIC dies on you? You're left with a computer that can't talk to the internet, without using some USB dongle work around, instead of native hardware. 

Having alternate ways to connect to the internet isn't being stuck in the past.. it's called preparing for outages, and allowing longer life to a product.


As to the optical drives, perhaps you want to burn a DVD or video from your iPhone to a disk to give to a family member. What now? Oh.. I should have bought that 150$ super-drive that's slower than a PC counterpart. Superdrives and ZIP Drives were the hit rage of the 90's with 120MB storage floppy disks. I remember having one for the first blueberry iMac because Apple took away the floppy disk drive. 


Who's really stuck in the past?


 
post #54 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Or you could just say WiFi doesn't work that well compared to wire Ethernet. Of course dozens will chime in telling you how well it works for them which may be true but if you are working with lots of data it is slow and unreliable.

Or you could tell him to just use Ethernet which is still available for every Mac.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #55 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by sestewart View Post

for 600$, you can get a nice PC laptop that still has optical drives and twice the memory space.

No doubt. If you measure value by the gigabyte and gigahertz, I'm sure there are cheap laptops that will offer more specs for your money. Buy it, if that's what you want.

But news flash: some people--call them ordinary people who aren't geeks--choose a Mac laptop because its a really nice consumer product. Something that looks stylish, feels solid, and says something about the affluence of its user. But geeks don't get that. It's all about Crysis benchmarks per dollar.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sestewart View Post

Apple seems to be stuck in the idea that everything will remain server side with cloud services, and computing will stay in the dumb terminal phase in the long run wit these products.

Yes, Apple is "stuck".
But somehow, when Google and Microsoft pursue the same strategy, they're forward thinking and innovative, right?

Did you miss the fact that Microsoft wants to be a devices and services company, and bet their future on cloud connected devices like Surface?

Did you miss Intel's shameless plugging of legacy-free Ultrabooks that are clones of the MacBook Air?
Quote:
Originally Posted by sestewart View Post

The iPad is already slumping in sales, because people are not interested in buying a new tablet every 2 years like a phone. PCs should last a decent 5-6 years before needing replaced, even longer now that the wear on PCs is being shifted to tablets and phones.

So it's bad if iPads don't need to be replaced every 2 years, then you tout that PC laptops don't need to be replaced in 5-6 years?

Why is that bad for Apple ("slumping sales") but not equally bad PC laptop makers? Don't trip while you are moving the goalposts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sestewart View Post

The price point for a plastic, bare bones mac should be 500-600$. Yet Apple still thinks they can be a PC competitor by having a high priced product, and then take everything out of it that people use daily. Currently, only ONE Macbook product comes with an ethernet port! IF everything's supposed to be cloud based, I would like to hard wire my Mac for streaming movies without the lag of wireless due to interference. Is it really that costly to include a gigabit ethernet port on a computer these days??

Hilarious. I can hard wire my MacBook Air to Ethernet. You seem hung up about connectors not being internal to a laptop. It's just you.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #56 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post

I hope we see Apple switch the MacBook Air and the Mac mini to ARM A7 CPUs.
Well, I'd like to see what Apple does with A8 and have that plugged into a laptop machine, maybe even a desktop. However it needs to run today's Mac OS.
Quote:
I also hope we see Apple tap Intel to manufacture these ARM CPUs.
This would hopefully allow Apple to
However in the context of using Intel the reasoning below is somewhat bogus.
Quote:
1) lower the price of their consumer Macs
Not really, Intel has high overhead, I can't see them competeing with silicon foundries that well. I doubt that they could even be price competitive with global foundries in Saratoga.
Quote:
2) pave the way to eliminating Samsung as a CPU supplier
That isn't the big deal many make it out to be.
Quote:
3) bring more manufacturing back to the USA.
Samsungs factory making Apple chips is in Texas, I'm rather shocked to see that people still don't grasp that A7 is US made. Frankly if they went Intel the chip could end up being produced anywhere in the world.
post #57 of 65
I think the idea of hooking up wired ethernet to a sub-notebook computer is hilarious. Maybe necessary sometimes, but still hilarious.
post #58 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post

No, MacBook Air = Netbook. Call it what you want, but its just a simple netbook.

What is your definition of a netbook?
I'm surprised nobody has asked you before.
post #59 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I think the idea of hooking up wired ethernet to a sub-notebook computer is hilarious. Maybe necessary sometimes, but still hilarious.

 

I can't help but think the same. Wireless is so fast these days. And the cable and port are miniscule. ;-)

post #60 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Instead of Apple having 95% of PC sales above $1,000, they will now have 95% of PC sales above $900.

Just that little bit of creep downward will terrify everyone else, but it’s not a market destroyer.

Actually if you look over the graph with this article you will notice that 19% of all laptop sales lay in the +$1000 price range. By dropping their price as they did, Apple adds another 10% of the total market within their price range. So, it could be said that whatever volume Apple has been selling before this could increase by 50%.

While not a "market destroyer" it is a sizable increase for Apple.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #61 of 65
Yes but it's not just a price thing in the obvious sense, there's other things included in Mac purchase price:
Free software upgrades
Free productivity and entertainment apps
iTunes services
iCloud integration
And
Lack of malware.
Think how much that costs people to put together in the PC world -- OK, some of this is free, but not all. Ascribe a value of say $200 to that --- what a PC user might pay on top of the cost of their windows system when they buy it -- and suddenly Apple is competing with windows machines valued from c.$650. That's the real deal -- the software and services are attractive, cost something on Windows, and when you compare the specs of Windows machines in the c.$699 bracket these Macs look really attractive, with better features and design, and made by the people who may make the phone or tablet you already love using as well.
it's a win.
post #62 of 65
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
Apple's first-ever battery-powered portable computer was the short-lived Macintosh Portable, which carried a hefty $6,500 starting price when it launched in 1989.

 

Saw one of those back in the day.  All 16 pounds of it.

Lead-acid batteries, track ball, and a tiny black-and-white screen.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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post #63 of 65

Not true if you account for software, OS upgrades and malware protection. These things cost pC users money. Apple's price competes with systems of lower cost on account of this.

post #64 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by sestewart View Post
 

Suppose

 

Well, OK.. what happens with your single point of failure wireless NIC dies on you? You're left with a computer that can't talk to the internet, without using some USB dongle work around, instead of native hardware. 

 

Having alternate ways to connect to the internet isn't being stuck in the past.. it's called preparing for outages, and allowing longer life to a product.

As to the optical drives, perhaps you want to burn a DVD or video from your iPhone to a disk to give to a family member. What now? Oh.. I should have bought that 150$ super-drive that's slower than a PC counterpart. Superdrives and ZIP Drives were the hit rage of the 90's with 120MB storage floppy disks. I remember having one for the first blueberry iMac because Apple took away the floppy disk drive. 

Who's really stuck in the past?

 


Oh just stop it with your worst-case scenario antics.  Just stop.

You are the one stuck in the past.  Let it go.

Optical drives are - for the most part - obsolete.  Why include something that rarely gets use?  It's one extra mechanical thing that can go wrong.  You need it, go buy an external one for the 2 - 3 times you'll use it, then have it gather dust in some desk drawer.

For laptops, a dedicated ethernet port is obsolete as well.  I don't know a single person with all the laptops I've come across that still uses a hardline.  That being said, I have a Thunderbolt-Ethernet adapter for those time I need hardline-speeds.  To date, I've probably used it a total of five times.  The rest of the time it gathers dust in my bag.  There's also USB->Ethernet dongles too.  In my case, my TB-LED monitor is connected to an ethernet cable, not my Mac.

It makes ZERO sense to include obsolete components, no matter how "cheap" the costs are for them.  Give me a slimmer, lighter, less-complex setup any day. 


So just quit with the "Well, what if..." stuff.  It became old about 10 years ago, and (in Apple's case) the laptops are built so well, if it ever fails, the tech will be that much better so as to get a new, updated Macbook.  That's just the way it is.

So let me know how redundant you want to get.  Dual motherboards, redundant RAM, Power Supplies, Displays... don't forget to have spare routers, switches, and access points on tap too because.... you... just...never...know.... when you'll need them.  *rolls eyes*

post #65 of 65
Quote:

Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

 

Saw one of those [Mac Portable] back in the day.  All 16 pounds of it.

Lead-acid batteries, track ball, and a tiny black-and-white screen.

 

I've got one, it its original case no less, out in the garage. Once we've finished moving, I plan to replace the lead-acid battery pack and get it back in operation. Wonder if I could get more than $50 for it once it's working?

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