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Sprint prepping cash for T-Mobile buy, CEO John Legere frontrunner to lead company

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
Sprint is reportedly making behind the scenes moves toward the purchase of T-Mobile, with current "uncarrier" CEO John Legere said to be a top candidate to run the new company if and when a deal is reached.

Sprint-T-Mo


According to people familiar with the matter, Sprint CFO Joe Euteneuer and Treasurer Greg Block recently met with banks to secure the capital and financing plans needed for the T-Mobile buyout, reports Bloomberg.

Masayoshi Son's SoftBank, which owns an 80 percent stake in Sprint, is said to be preparing an official bid for June or July, though the figures attached to the supposed deal are not known. Deutsche Telekom, which owns 67 percent of T-Mobile, is reportedly interested in a mostly-cash deal, sources said.

While the arrangement is far from finalized, the two companies are already thinking about who will take the reigns as CEO if and when the buyout happens. People with knowledge of the companies' ongoing talks said outspoken T-Mobile CEO John Legere is one of the top choices. Legere is perhaps the most well-known chief executive of the four major U.S. carriers thanks to a strong social media presence. .

News that Sprint was first mulling a T-Mobile bid came in December. At the time, speculation put the deal at up to $20 billion, depending on how much stake Sprint was in for. That's more than $1.5 billion less than what Son paid for SoftBank's controlling interest of Sprint in July 2013, but T-Mobile has some $8.7 billion in debt that would be transferred as part of the deal.

If the sale goes through as planned, it would bring together the third- and fourth-largest U.S. telecoms, effectively creating a rival company to Verizon and AT&T. Separately, Sprint and T-Mobile's respective marketshares are dwarfed in comparison to either of the nation's top-two providers. A merger would make the new company a true contender in the battle for subscribers.

What remains to be seen, however, is how the Federal Communications Commission will react to Sprint's bid. In 2011, the body shot down AT&T's proposed merger with T-Mobile, which would have given it marketshare rivaling that of Verizon.

According to sources, Son believes AT&T was not adequately prepared to handle the FCC's questioning. To that end, by the time the deal comes up for regulation, Sprint will have a detailed prospectus describing how a T-Mobile buyout would be in the public's interest.
post #2 of 42

“Sprint T-Mobile” anagrams into “Problems in tit”.

 

Guess they’ll have to come up with another company name.

 

Ah, Snottier Blimp!

post #3 of 42
Can't see why they'd want T-Mobile. They're 2 totally different networks. I can see this ending up like the Sprint/Nextel merger which didn't end well.

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post #4 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post

Can't see why they'd want T-Mobile. They're 2 totally different networks. I can see this ending up like the Sprint/Nextel merger which didn't end well.

AT&T and Cingular had 2 different networks. That turned out pretty well.
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post #5 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


AT&T and Cingular had 2 different networks. That turned out pretty well.

 

Thats because they were both GSM networks so no, they were the same. T-Mobile is GSM and Sprint is CDMA.

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post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post

Thats because they were both GSM networks so no, they were the same. T-Mobile is GSM and Sprint is CDMA.

Wrong. AT&T was TDMA.
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post #7 of 42
It's a bad fit.. 1oyvey.gif Why would DoJ and FCC want a debt laden company to gobble up one thats actually not only making a comeback but kicking competitions butt and taking names.. T-Mobile is forcing some good changes to the industry..

T-Mobile is also the golden reason they Declined the ATT acquisition. All the FCC and DoJ need to do when they tell Sprint no, is point out how right they were and how well T-Mobile is doing..

Why risk dragging 2 down (Sprint and T-Mobile) with merger, when they could just let Sprint live or die and T-Mobile continue to thrive and grow separately? T-Mobile already has new 700Mhz block sale finalized.. and more spectrum to come.. They are not hurting right now and have room to grow..

ONLY way would be if they let John stay on from T-Mobile as CEO and practically scrapped the Sprint network.. It's got way to many issues, legacy problems, etc. T-Mobile would do what they did for MetroPCS, which was CDMA... As customers got new phones, they got ones that worked on the GSM/LTE network of T-Mobile.. migrating them over.. One issue I see is it would take years.. 2-3 year upgrade cycle on Sprint..
post #8 of 42
It shall be called "Sprintmobile".

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post #9 of 42
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
It shall be called "Sprintmobile".


Holy Telephony, Sprintman!

post #10 of 42

Edit because I screwed up.

post #11 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Wrong. AT&T was TDMA.

GSM is very similar to TDMA. The two are are much more closely linked than trying to get GSM and CDMA working together on the same network. AT&T wouldn't have bought them if they had wholly different standards. AT&T buying Cingular makes far more sense because the two technologies are very similar, having GSM and CDMA on the same network doesn't. Sprint seems to be wanting to buy someone that actually is a threat and one that they can afford.

post #12 of 42

Sprint sucks.  T-Mobile is way better than Sprint.  And now T-Mobile will sink down to Sprints level.  I guess The actual two giants will rule now.  AT&T and Verizon.  In my opinion they are the only two real networks.

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post #13 of 42
I was considering trying out T-Mobile with the next iPhone but I don't have any interest to use Sprin-T (pronounced Sprinty) so I'll try Verizon again.

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post #14 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by HKZ View Post
 

GSM is very similar to TDMA. The two are are much more closely linked than trying to get GSM and CDMA working together on the same network. AT&T wouldn't have bought them if they had wholly different standards. AT&T buying Cingular makes far more sense because the two technologies are very similar, having GSM and CDMA on the same network doesn't. Sprint seems to be wanting to buy someone that actually is a threat and one that they can afford.

 Cingular migrated from AMPS (analog cellular) to TDMA to GSM (AMPS and TDMA co-existed for some time in many areas). I'm not sure but I think the old AT&T (pre-merger) followed a similar, if not same path. It made it a good fit (technologically) for both companies to merge, since they were already going down the same migration path.

post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Holy Telephony, Sprintman!

Quick! To the Sprintphone... 'Do-Do-Dooo' "We're sorry. The number you have reached is unavailable. Please try your call again later. Good-bye."

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post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I was considering trying out T-Mobile with the next iPhone but I don't have any interest to use Sprin-T (pronounced Sprinty) so I'll try Verizon again.

That seems strange. I mean, the deal hasn't been announced or approved. Further, you are not stuck on a contract with T-Mobile. So, try it out now, if things go bad, you leave. 

post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by formosa View Post
 

 Cingular migrated from AMPS (analog cellular) to TDMA to GSM (AMPS and TDMA co-existed for some time in many areas). I'm not sure but I think the old AT&T (pre-merger) followed a similar, if not same path. It made it a good fit (technologically) for both companies to merge, since they were already going down the same migration path.

 

Correct. AT&T Wireless was already building out GSM side-by-side with TDMA when the merger with Cingular was announced. At the time, I believe Cingular was providing GSM services with an agreement with T-Mobile while its pre-GSM network was also TDMA.

 

As someone said earlier, the AT&T Wireless/Cingular merger made sense due to compatible technologies, and because post-merger each of the two companies would no longer incur separate costs investing in its own network equipment, cell site leases, etc; these efforts would be combined into a single network, saving a ton of money.

 

Sprint's CDMA network is aging rapidly and needs to be updated. T-Mobile is investing in upgrading its GSM network to LTE, so it makes sense for Sprint to merge with them to save the cost they would incur by building out a separate LTE network for the same reason it made sense for the AWS/Cingular merger. Sprint and T-Mobile may not have compatible networks today, but ultimately they will as Sprint will inevitably be forced to follow AT&T and T-Mobile to LTE.

post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

That seems strange. I mean, the deal hasn't been announced or approved. Further, you are not stuck on a contract with T-Mobile. So, try it out now, if things go bad, you leave. 

1) According to the rumour the official bid will happen in June or July which is 2-4 months before Apple releases the next iPhone.What's strange about that?

2) A contract is never a barrier because you can always pay the ETF.

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post #19 of 42
Not in the public interest.
post #20 of 42

I thought T-mobile improved their business recently?

 

Please keep Sprint away from my T-mobile :-(

 

What color does Magenta and yellow make? Some weird orange? I don't want ORANGE!!!

post #21 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



2) A contract is never a barrier because you can always pay the ETF.

Sounds logical.

1bugeye.gif
post #22 of 42
Blecch. Hope it never happens.

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post #23 of 42
Voice over LTE is coming, which is the migration path for both CDMA and GSM. So, in the next generation of cellular voice, there will be no incompatible technologies like CDMA vs GSM.

Creating a real competitor to AT&T and Verizon may be beneficial to consumers. Currently, both Sprint and T-Mobile coverages are limited compared to AT&T and Verizon. My Shared Value unlimited voice plan on AT&T with 10 GB of shared data costs me $130 (two phones) before my discount. In reality, my monthly bill is $115, including tax. I don't think T-Mobile can beat this. Sprint is so bad that I won't even consider it as an alternative.

Provided that T-Mobile coverage is dwarfed by AT&T's, I have no alternative to AT&T right now. Verizon is much more expensive and lacks simultaneous voice and data with iPhones.

I'm getting 68 Mbps download / 22 Mbps upload on AT&T LTE in my house. It's hard to complain - I'm pretty satisfied with AT&T.
Edited by sirozha - 5/1/14 at 4:05am
post #24 of 42
Don't see how this affects Apple in any substantive way.

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post #25 of 42
There are iPhones that can receive both CDMA and GSM/LTE. Let's see what iPhone 6 brings to the table to ease the merger, which I think might work with Legere at the helm.
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post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Don't see how this affects Apple in any substantive way.

It affects anyone with an iPhone on T-mobile or Sprint. How a merger would affect their plans or policies is anyone's guess.

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post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post

Sounds logical.

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iPhone purchase in full is $649
iPhone purchase with a contract is $199 + $350 ETF = $549.

I would save $100 money by simply paying the ETF (which drops by $10 per month with contractual usage) than simply buying outright. Ergo, the ETF is not a barrier when you have money to pay for the device in full.

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post #28 of 42
Quote:

...[T]he two companies are already thinking about who will take the reigns...

 

 

take the reins, as in steer the horse. Don't be a homophone-ophobe.

post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


iPhone purchase in full is $649
iPhone purchase with a contract is $199 + $350 ETF = $549.

I would save $100 money by simply paying the ETF (which drops by $10 per month with contractual usage) than simply buying outright. Ergo, the ETF is not a barrier when you have money to pay for the device in full.

 

And getting the carrier to unlock the phone for you so you can use it on another carrier, after you've terminated their service?

 

Good luck with that. 

post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post

And getting the carrier to unlock the phone for you so you can use it on another carrier, after you've terminated their service?

Good luck with that. 

1) This hasn't been an issue in the US for a couple years.

2) That has no barring to the cost barrier which is what you directly disagreed with.

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post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


1) This hasn't been an issue in the US for a couple years.

2) That has no barring to the cost barrier which is what you directly disagreed with.

I've known people that have had issues doing this. It was over a year ago so many things are better now? 

 

It wouldn't be a barrier, as long as the carrier unlocked the phone for you. 

I don't believe that ATT would just factory unlock the phone that you bought from them after using it less than one month, after paying the termination fees, and canceling the service, so you could use it on T-Mobile. If the retail cost is more than the subsidized cost of the phone + termination fees, then ATT would lose money and have to eat that cost. Have any proof you can give to me that this can be done? Because I think this is the way I want to get my next iPhone (I'm a T-Mobile customer currently)

post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post

I've known people that have had issues doing this. It was over a year ago so many things are better now? 

It wouldn't be a barrier, as long as the carrier unlocked the phone for you. 
I don't believe that ATT would just factory unlock the phone that you bought from them after using it less than one month, after paying the termination fees, and canceling the service, so you could use it on T-Mobile. If the retail cost is more than the subsidized cost of the phone + termination fees, then ATT would lose money and have to eat that cost. Have any proof you can give to me that this can be done? Because I think this is the way I want to get my next iPhone (I'm a T-Mobile customer currently)

This was big news just over 2 years ago. And, YES, in the US this is the cheapest way to buy an iPhone although there is something about having to wait 6(?) months before signing back up with the carrier so this isn't something you can reasonably do repeatedly to make $100, not to mention you're also paying at least a prorated month of fees and a $36 activation fee which eat in into any potential profits. Bottom line, it's something you do when you decide you no longer want to be on a carrier, not something you do to make money.

The CMDA iPhone are obviously still tied to those CDMA carriers but the GSM portion isn't locked.

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post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


This was big news just over 2 years ago. And, YES, in the US this is the cheapest way to buy an iPhone although there is something about having to wait 6(?) months before signing back up with the carrier so this isn't something you can reasonably do repeatedly to make $100, not to mention you're also paying at least a prorated month of fees and a $36 activation fee which eat in into any potential profits. Bottom line, it's something you do when you decide you no longer want to be on a carrier, not something you do to make money.
The CMDA iPhone are obviously still tied to those CDMA carriers but the GSM portion isn't locked.

 

Thanks, 

I wonder if T-Mobile will still pay the termination fees when the iPhone 6 comes out... thinking of buying $400 64GB iPhone (maybe this size will be cheaper when the 6 is released?) then going back to T-Mobile and having them pay the fees *wrings fists mischievously* 

post #34 of 42

It is pretty apparent from the comments that none so far at least understand how multi-mode base stations work. Sprint implemented multi-mode stations as a part of the network vision overhaul. It would be a very simple thing to include GSM along with CDMA, LTE, and even wimax on the same stations relatively easily and cheaply. That however is not the main issue. The bigger questions if this happened is the spectrum since they both operate on different bands though there is some overlap. It is possible some spectrum would need to be sold to Dish or others.  Also there is the questions of the plans. Would there be a unification around new plans entirely or would there be a timeframe for people to continue to grandfather on their current plans for a few more years. 

 

I am with Sprint and I am very happy with my coverage and service. I average about 20 up 8 down which may not be as fast as AT&T or Verizon but on a phone that is more than sufficient for anything I need to do. I wonder if all these "Sprint sucks" comments are based on actual and current customers or just people expressing their opinion of Sprint based from years ago or just from reading comments continually saying that over and over. I don't claim that Sprint has nearly the coverage of Verizon but I am very content. If done right this could be good for both companies. The Nextel purchase was really an example of what not to do. That fiasco was due to the former CEO of Sprint so you can't really blame Hesse who has begun to actually turn things around. I am not loyal to any cell company. I simply want the best bang for my buck and if I get good voice and data speeds I have no reason to look elsewhere. I only pay $50 a month for unlimited everything on Sprint so I would be a fool to look elsewhere right now especially since LTE is available everywhere I go now. You can even get cheaper than that at $45 on a family plan but with those plans there is no phone subsidy though you can pay it off interest free over 24 months I believe. 

 

Sprint may indeed suck where you live but please don't assume it sucks everywhere or Sprint wouldn't have close to 55 million customers when you include Boost, Virgin, and other MVNO's. They have around 225 million covered with LTE now which is not bad. The reason the rollout has been slower and more painful for current customers is they are doing an far more massive and extensive overhaul than the other carriers which should pay off in a few years once those other carriers will eventually also need to do the same changes. Since I just had a teeth cleaning yesterday I think a good analogy is you can compare what Sprint did to a full debridement as opposed to the others doing a prophylaxis. Their Network Vision updates are way behind schedule though apparently mostly due to Ericson who is contracted to do many of the upgrades. But the good news for Sprint is they should finally have their network upgraded completely by the end of this year. 

 

Even with unlimited LTE data and a bill of only $50 a month if my service ever became complete crap I would switch in a heartbeat. One other reason I am so excited about the iPhone 6 besides the larger screen is the addition of Sprint Spark on the next iPhone which could allow speeds up to 60Mbps.

post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post
 

That seems strange. I mean, the deal hasn't been announced or approved. Further, you are not stuck on a contract with T-Mobile. So, try it out now, if things go bad, you leave. 

Not to mention if Legere is the CEO of the merged company, it'll be run like T-Mobile was, not Sprint.

 

It's almost like Apple buying Next and getting Jobs back in the deal.

post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnAmazingThing View Post
 

I thought T-mobile improved their business recently?

 

Please keep Sprint away from my T-mobile :-(

 

What color does Magenta and yellow make? Some weird orange? I don't want ORANGE!!!

They'll switch to gold because they're sassy!

post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrayven View Post

It's a bad fit.. 1oyvey.gif Why would DoJ and FCC want a debt laden company to gobble up one thats actually not only making a comeback but kicking competitions butt and taking names.. T-Mobile is forcing some good changes to the industry..

T-Mobile is also the golden reason they Declined the ATT acquisition. All the FCC and DoJ need to do when they tell Sprint no, is point out how right they were and how well T-Mobile is doing..

Why risk dragging 2 down (Sprint and T-Mobile) with merger, when they could just let Sprint live or die and T-Mobile continue to thrive and grow separately? T-Mobile already has new 700Mhz block sale finalized.. and more spectrum to come.. They are not hurting right now and have room to grow..

ONLY way would be if they let John stay on from T-Mobile as CEO and practically scrapped the Sprint network.. It's got way to many issues, legacy problems, etc. T-Mobile would do what they did for MetroPCS, which was CDMA... As customers got new phones, they got ones that worked on the GSM/LTE network of T-Mobile.. migrating them over.. One issue I see is it would take years.. 2-3 year upgrade cycle on Sprint..

 

I 'd totally agree with you on this.  Except there may be some value in having a stronger company with LTE capability.  If Legere can manage the Sprint LTE rollout and the merger well, it may well hasten the highly needed revamping of the awful mobile situation in the US.  Still, it's  abig risk.  It could end up distracting T-Mobile and derailing all its momentum.  Legere doesn't seem to be publicly averse to it, so maybe he has a plan.

post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirozha View Post

Creating a real competitor to AT&T and Verizon may be beneficial to consumers. Currently, both Sprint and T-Mobile coverages are limited compared to AT&T and Verizon. My Shared Value unlimited voice plan on AT&T with 10 GB of shared data costs me $130 (two phones) before my discount. In reality, my monthly bill is $115, including tax. I don't think T-Mobile can beat this. Sprint is so bad that I won't even consider it as an alternative.

 

I think T-Mobile can already beat that.  My friend is paying $120 for 3 lines on T-Mobile.  At least 1 of them is 5GB and 1 is 2GB.  Another friend has 5 lines for ~$140.  The first 2 lines on T-Mobile are expensive.  But the 3rd, 4th and 5th lines are just $10 each with 1GB on each line.  Nobody is cheaper than that.  Not even MVNOs.  The problem though is that both of them are now complaining of poor service and dropped calls.  And that's in Atlanta so I'm sure in the boonies it may be worse.  Price wise, T-Mobile is heading the right way.  But they need to get their BYOD prices down a lot more.  At that point a Nexus 5, Moto X or PlusOne would make it a massive saving per month.

post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post
 

It is pretty apparent from the comments that none so far at least understand how multi-mode base stations work. Sprint implemented multi-mode stations as a part of the network vision overhaul. It would be a very simple thing to include GSM along with CDMA, LTE, and even wimax on the same stations relatively easily and cheaply. That however is not the main issue. The bigger questions if this happened is the spectrum since they both operate on different bands though there is some overlap. It is possible some spectrum would need to be sold to Dish or others.  Also there is the questions of the plans. Would there be a unification around new plans entirely or would there be a timeframe for people to continue to grandfather on their current plans for a few more years. 

 

I am with Sprint and I am very happy with my coverage and service. I average about 20 up 8 down which may not be as fast as AT&T or Verizon but on a phone that is more than sufficient for anything I need to do. I wonder if all these "Sprint sucks" comments are based on actual and current customers or just people expressing their opinion of Sprint based from years ago or just from reading comments continually saying that over and over. I don't claim that Sprint has nearly the coverage of Verizon but I am very content. If done right this could be good for both companies. The Nextel purchase was really an example of what not to do. That fiasco was due to the former CEO of Sprint so you can't really blame Hesse who has begun to actually turn things around. I am not loyal to any cell company. I simply want the best bang for my buck and if I get good voice and data speeds I have no reason to look elsewhere. I only pay $50 a month for unlimited everything on Sprint so I would be a fool to look elsewhere right now especially since LTE is available everywhere I go now. You can even get cheaper than that at $45 on a family plan but with those plans there is no phone subsidy though you can pay it off interest free over 24 months I believe. 

 

Sprint may indeed suck where you live but please don't assume it sucks everywhere or Sprint wouldn't have close to 55 million customers when you include Boost, Virgin, and other MVNO's. They have around 225 million covered with LTE now which is not bad. The reason the rollout has been slower and more painful for current customers is they are doing an far more massive and extensive overhaul than the other carriers which should pay off in a few years once those other carriers will eventually also need to do the same changes. Since I just had a teeth cleaning yesterday I think a good analogy is you can compare what Sprint did to a full debridement as opposed to the others doing a prophylaxis. Their Network Vision updates are way behind schedule though apparently mostly due to Ericson who is contracted to do many of the upgrades. But the good news for Sprint is they should finally have their network upgraded completely by the end of this year. 

 

Even with unlimited LTE data and a bill of only $50 a month if my service ever became complete crap I would switch in a heartbeat. One other reason I am so excited about the iPhone 6 besides the larger screen is the addition of Sprint Spark on the next iPhone which could allow speeds up to 60Mbps.

 

Sprint really does suck for me.  I'm in Atlanta which is supposed to have LTE.  I get LTE in some locations (like home where I don't need it), but a lot of 3G.  And Sprint's 3G speeds are like every one else's 2G speeds.  At home, where I get LTE, I typically get download speeds of 6Mbps.  On my son's T-Mobile connection, it's around 20Mbps.  On a friend's Verizon phone, it was 55Mbps.  I got Sprint Spark on my LG G2 a few months ago and the speeds didn't improve any.  I have been hearing about Sprint's Network Vision overhaul for years and it's always just around the corner. 

 

The reason I stick with Sprint is that I have a no-contract plan paying $45 per month for unlimited everything and I'm still hoping that they will actually deliver on their promise.  Customer Service has become really good.   I just wish their service would get as good as well.  Now that they all their flagship phones are world phones which I can use when I travel abroad, that's one less problem I have with Sprint now.

post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by os2baba View Post
 

 

Sprint really does suck for me.  I'm in Atlanta which is supposed to have LTE.  I get LTE in some locations (like home where I don't need it), but a lot of 3G.  And Sprint's 3G speeds are like every one else's 2G speeds.  At home, where I get LTE, I typically get download speeds of 6Mbps.  On my son's T-Mobile connection, it's around 20Mbps.  On a friend's Verizon phone, it was 55Mbps.  I got Sprint Spark on my LG G2 a few months ago and the speeds didn't improve any.  I have been hearing about Sprint's Network Vision overhaul for years and it's always just around the corner. 

 

The reason I stick with Sprint is that I have a no-contract plan paying $45 per month for unlimited everything and I'm still hoping that they will actually deliver on their promise.  Customer Service has become really good.   I just wish their service would get as good as well.  Now that they all their flagship phones are world phones which I can use when I travel abroad, that's one less problem I have with Sprint now.

 

I'm in Atlanta also but it is a huge city so your mileage may vary. I get LTE pretty consistently  all over metro Atlanta though on my 5s even at Stone mountain and Six Flag and even down to Henry county.  I work in Buckhead and also spend a lot of time in Lenox and midtown areas and live in Dunwoody. Atlanta seems to get great LTE with all the carriers and was also among the very first for all 4 carriers to have LTE so lots of options. All I can tell you is that my 5s gets good LTE in Atlanta wherever I go at least so not sure why you are having problems. What neighborhoods are you mostly in? 

 

There is no Sprint Spark in Atlanta yet so I assume you meant in a spark city like Miami. Spark cities are showing up to 77Mbps http://blogs.barrons.com/techtraderdaily/2014/04/29/sprint-shows-off-spark-download-speeds-of-77mbps/

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