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Angela Ahrendts joins Apple, Inc., tasked with polishing flat retail operations - Page 2

post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post
 

You could look into her background before posting nonsense.

 

What is there to know?, I don't care about her past, while at Apple she had better, DO NO HARM! The last person (fellow Brit) from Dixon's failed. JACKASS.

post #42 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danox View Post
 

 

What is there to know?, I don't care about her past, while at Apple she had better, DO NO HARM! The last person (fellow Brit) from Dixon's failed. JACKASS.


Interestingly the Brits on here were not happy when they heard about Browett, claiming that he wasn't any better for Dixons. I suspect Cook and the rest of management was trying to pull more profit out of retail by cost cutting and only later decided it was a mistake. In this case you're talking about someone who has been fairly aggressive on growing awareness of what has always been a very conservatively styled luxury brand among younger people. It seems like a fairly good match. Just randomly posting in caps not to screw something up reeks of fanboy nonsense to me, even from otherwise rational posters. There wasn't any reasoning given, and in this case you clearly didn't bother to learn anything about the hire.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


Just no tartan pattern shirts on the geniuses, please.

 

Those predate her. One of their older markets is golf apparel.

post #43 of 53
Also, Angela Ahrendts is American.

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post #44 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Apple Retail needs to balance speed with user experience. 

If you have a problem with your Apple device a Genius Bar that is on time and effective is going to have a happy customer leaving. 

People walking in looking for products  want clarity.   Apple stores have improved over the years in this arena.  Gone are the stations with microphones and keyboards that few people knew how to operate. 

As devices get smaller (read wearables) Apple's stores will have to adapt.  How can they show me an iWatch without risking hundreds being stolen off a shelf or from a table a year?   

How can they make it easier for me to place an order from my phone and have it ready as I walk through the front door? 

How can they offer me training that I can get value from without me disturbing or being disturbed by others? 

I'm excited to see what she can do. 

Apple currently sells iPod shuffles and nanos with no problems and they are quite small.

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post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Also, Angela Ahrendts is American.

She is indeed. Just watched her TED presentation. She's not a bad presenter, truth be told. At her level there seems to be a similar type of presentation style among executives. I suppose presentation training for executives is de rigeur these days.

Also, her Wikipedia page has this interesting bit: "Ahrendts says she does not model her approach after any other fashion house, but looks to world class design as an influence including Apple Inc."

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post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

She's not a bad presenter, truth be told.

She doesn't look very good at presenting to me, especially in spontaneous conversation:



Here are some details about her:

http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/blogs/suzannah-ramsdale/543163/meet-the-richest-woman-in-fashion-just-how-did-burberry-s-boss-get-to-the-top.html

"Ahrendts has been credited with 'de-chavving' Burberry (who would have thought there was any way back from the infamous Burberry check sported by many a minor celeb) and turning it into one of the world's most powerful luxury fashion houses. It's now worth £6 billion.

1. Ahrendts is a devoted Christian and says she reads the bible every day.

2. She's thought to have a £25,000 clothing allowance, on top of her staff discount, and is rarely seen wearing anything but Burberry Prorsum. Although, that is probably about to change...

3. She makes it through her gruelling days by drinking Diet Coke by the bucket load. She was once quoted as saying: 'My blood runs brown.'

4. She has not taken a day off sick in twenty-five years.

5. She is university educated with a degree in merchandising and marketing from Ball State Univsersity.

6. She grew up in the small town of New Palestine in Indiana, as one of six children whose parents were a local businessman and a part-time model. The eight of them shared just four bedrooms so using her creative talents, Ahrendts made herself a little oasis in the understairs cupboard. She was famous for it in her neighbourhood.

7. She has two Bernese Mountain dogs called Sonny and Rocker.

8. She has three children: son Jennings, 17, and daughters Sommer, 16, and Angelina, 12.

9. She married her high school sweetheart, Gregg, who gave up his New York contracting business to move to London for Ahrendts' Burberry gig and become a stay-at-home dad.

10. The couple had a long-distance relationship for 17 years while Ahrendts lived and worked in Manhattan and Gregg stayed in Indianapolis.

11. She had always dreamed of a career in fashion and before joining Burberry in 2006, Ahrendts was executive vice-president at US brand Liz Claiborne and president of Donna Karan International for six years.

12. She and her family don't live in London, instead they bought a Georgian-style manor house in the suburbs west of the city, which husband Gregg is currently renovating. It's a 12,000-square-foot estate with an indoor pool and a tennis court.

13. Despite the path she's paving for women in the corporate world, Ahrendts is firmly against boardroom quotas for women. Last year, she said: 'I am not in favour of quotas. Just put the best person into the job. It is not about gender, it is about experience, leadership and vision. A man could do this job.'"

She seems like a very thoughtful person, not very creative herself by her own admission but hired people who were. She relied on her chief creative officer Chris Bailey for the creative direction and he's now Burberry's CEO.

One thing she talks about is Burberry's connection to the customer via social media and how they've launched products using Facebook. They've done similar things using Weibo and Youku in China. Apple took more to using twitter recently but it can be tacky if it's used wrongly. Social media is precarious when you try to promote a connection to a person while trying to sell them something.

Some people have this idea that she's being setup to take over from Tim Cook but she's the same age as him and will retire at the same time. Tim has proved many times over that he was a great choice for CEO. He said Angela was a good choice because she communicated the same values that are important to Apple.

The same was apparently true of Browett:

http://www.ibtimes.com/john-browett-why-apple-hired-dixons-ceo-steer-retail-403290

"Apple chose the 48-year-old Browett not only for his financial and customer service savvy, but because he's a great fit for the Apple brand. Browett is a fanatic about health and fitness, he loves music from Mozart and Madonna and he's a big fan of sailing, but more importantly, he hates the boardroom approach to business. In fact, much like Apple founder Steve Jobs did, Browett refuses to wear a suit and tie.

I am not particularly motivated by money, power, or celebrity, Browett said. I think that those things are frankly for the birds, I don't really care about them. What really drives me is if I can see I can make a difference"

As we know, he wasn't a good fit for Apple and you could see that a mile away. One of the strengths of being in executive positions responsible for hiring is being able to find good people. Steve Jobs failed at this with Sculley. Whoever hired Browett made the wrong choice - awarding $60m in stock for the role is going to bring in a lot of fakers. They could have offered $1 for the role and see who takes it on. Then talk about the big money later.

Hopefully Angela will be up to the task of running the operation. It's not like Apple's retail chain is struggling but they need to maintain an appeal with a younger audience. The idea that Apple products are for older people seems to be picking up in a few competitors' marketing - Microsoft/Nokia used it: 'aren't you a little young to have an iPhone' said to an older woman, Samsung used it in the line ad where the guy is saving a seat for his parents. Dealing with fashion might help out here in maintaining the connection to a younger audience.

One thing she might be able to help out with is Apple's mobile payments. If they can get a mobile payments solution that women would actually use when paying for clothes, that would be a breakthrough. It's all very well appealing to techy guys who want to use Paypal or something but if you can get casual buyers to adopt the payments system, that's where it takes off.

As always, the individuals in leadership roles are just that - individuals. Their influence is only seen if they make radical changes. A lot of the time, they get more credit than due (typically company value changes during tenure) and at times undue criticism. She'll be another cog in the machine.

It's good to have people who are thoughtful and kind. It wouldn't hurt if she stopped wearing outdoor coats indoors but I get the impression she'll be kinder to the staff than cost-cutting Browett was.
post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


She doesn't look very good at presenting to me, especially in spontaneous conversation:



Here are some details about her:

http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/blogs/suzannah-ramsdale/543163/meet-the-richest-woman-in-fashion-just-how-did-burberry-s-boss-get-to-the-top.html

"Ahrendts has been credited with 'de-chavving' Burberry (who would have thought there was any way back from the infamous Burberry check sported by many a minor celeb) and turning it into one of the world's most powerful luxury fashion houses. It's now worth £6 billion.

1. Ahrendts is a devoted Christian and says she reads the bible every day.

2. She's thought to have a £25,000 clothing allowance, on top of her staff discount, and is rarely seen wearing anything but Burberry Prorsum. Although, that is probably about to change...

3. She makes it through her gruelling days by drinking Diet Coke by the bucket load. She was once quoted as saying: 'My blood runs brown.'

4. She has not taken a day off sick in twenty-five years.

5. She is university educated with a degree in merchandising and marketing from Ball State Univsersity.

6. She grew up in the small town of New Palestine in Indiana, as one of six children whose parents were a local businessman and a part-time model. The eight of them shared just four bedrooms so using her creative talents, Ahrendts made herself a little oasis in the understairs cupboard. She was famous for it in her neighbourhood.

7. She has two Bernese Mountain dogs called Sonny and Rocker.

8. She has three children: son Jennings, 17, and daughters Sommer, 16, and Angelina, 12.

9. She married her high school sweetheart, Gregg, who gave up his New York contracting business to move to London for Ahrendts' Burberry gig and become a stay-at-home dad.

10. The couple had a long-distance relationship for 17 years while Ahrendts lived and worked in Manhattan and Gregg stayed in Indianapolis.

11. She had always dreamed of a career in fashion and before joining Burberry in 2006, Ahrendts was executive vice-president at US brand Liz Claiborne and president of Donna Karan International for six years.

12. She and her family don't live in London, instead they bought a Georgian-style manor house in the suburbs west of the city, which husband Gregg is currently renovating. It's a 12,000-square-foot estate with an indoor pool and a tennis court.

13. Despite the path she's paving for women in the corporate world, Ahrendts is firmly against boardroom quotas for women. Last year, she said: 'I am not in favour of quotas. Just put the best person into the job. It is not about gender, it is about experience, leadership and vision. A man could do this job.'"

She seems like a very thoughtful person, not very creative herself by her own admission but hired people who were. She relied on her chief creative officer Chris Bailey for the creative direction and he's now Burberry's CEO.

One thing she talks about is Burberry's connection to the customer via social media and how they've launched products using Facebook. They've done similar things using Weibo and Youku in China. Apple took more to using twitter recently but it can be tacky if it's used wrongly. Social media is precarious when you try to promote a connection to a person while trying to sell them something.

Some people have this idea that she's being setup to take over from Tim Cook but she's the same age as him and will retire at the same time. Tim has proved many times over that he was a great choice for CEO. He said Angela was a good choice because she communicated the same values that are important to Apple.

The same was apparently true of Browett:

http://www.ibtimes.com/john-browett-why-apple-hired-dixons-ceo-steer-retail-403290

"Apple chose the 48-year-old Browett not only for his financial and customer service savvy, but because he's a great fit for the Apple brand. Browett is a fanatic about health and fitness, he loves music from Mozart and Madonna and he's a big fan of sailing, but more importantly, he hates the boardroom approach to business. In fact, much like Apple founder Steve Jobs did, Browett refuses to wear a suit and tie.

I am not particularly motivated by money, power, or celebrity, Browett said. I think that those things are frankly for the birds, I don't really care about them. What really drives me is if I can see I can make a difference"

As we know, he wasn't a good fit for Apple and you could see that a mile away. One of the strengths of being in executive positions responsible for hiring is being able to find good people. Steve Jobs failed at this with Sculley. Whoever hired Browett made the wrong choice - awarding $60m in stock for the role is going to bring in a lot of fakers. They could have offered $1 for the role and see who takes it on. Then talk about the big money later.

Hopefully Angela will be up to the task of running the operation. It's not like Apple's retail chain is struggling but they need to maintain an appeal with a younger audience. The idea that Apple products are for older people seems to be picking up in a few competitors' marketing - Microsoft/Nokia used it: 'aren't you a little young to have an iPhone' said to an older woman, Samsung used it in the line ad where the guy is saving a seat for his parents. Dealing with fashion might help out here in maintaining the connection to a younger audience.

One thing she might be able to help out with is Apple's mobile payments. If they can get a mobile payments solution that women would actually use when paying for clothes, that would be a breakthrough. It's all very well appealing to techy guys who want to use Paypal or something but if you can get casual buyers to adopt the payments system, that's where it takes off.

As always, the individuals in leadership roles are just that - individuals. Their influence is only seen if they make radical changes. A lot of the time, they get more credit than due (typically company value changes during tenure) and at times undue criticism. She'll be another cog in the machine.

It's good to have people who are thoughtful and kind. It wouldn't hurt if she stopped wearing outdoor coats indoors but I get the impression she'll be kinder to the staff than cost-cutting Browett was.

Nice resume of AA. I'm not sure about your point with Apple being out of fashion with the young. I suspect that Android is much more popular amongst teenagers because teenagers are poor.

“I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.”
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post #48 of 53

 

 

There are some facial characteristics that are similar, I admit.


Edited by SpamSandwich - 5/3/14 at 3:50pm

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post #49 of 53
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

There are some facial characteristics that are similar, I admit.

 

Are glasses facial characteristics, or am I just bad at distinguishing faces?

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #50 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Are glasses facial characteristics, or am I just bad at distinguishing faces?

No and no!

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post #51 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

I'm not sure about your point with Apple being out of fashion with the young. I suspect that Android is much more popular amongst teenagers because teenagers are poor.

It's not in reality out of fashion with young people, it's pretty close with Android:

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2013/04/apples-iphone-still-reigns-supreme-in-key-demographic.html
http://www.marketingprofs.com/charts/2013/10957/how-iphone-and-android-ownership-varies-by-demographic

It's just one of the marketing angles that Apple's competitors picked up on. Apple just needs to make sure that perception doesn't start to take hold. This can happen with fashion, where items that were once fashionable become uncool.

Apple is an easy target for a few marketing tactics. Digital music took off with Napster and file sharing by young people. Apple locks down apps (no torrent apps, porn apps, bitcoin apps), the OS from too many changes. Apple's 'it's for your own good' approach can start to alienate young people. They just need to keep on top of it. Angela Ahrendts having experience in the fashion industry will have experience in how to deal with changing trends and adapt the sales approach so that experience might come in useful later on, the more that the smartphone market slows down.
post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

You'd be surprised. Retail is a dark art.

Agreed, I owned and ran several independent Apple retail centers for many years, so you are preaching to the converted. My point was they are pretty damn good now and the pause in sales from them is more likely due to most waiting for new product cycles. Don't know about you but I pretty much bought just about everything new from Apple this last Christmas period that Apple make, so no need of anything else ... yet ... 1biggrin.gif
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #53 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by pe8er8 View Post
 

If I was a sarcastic person I would point out they're the world's leading consumer tech company. However, it is a valid point, one that I don't agree with. I think a big part of the Apple "brand" is it's clean, high quality, tightly focused product line and consumer experience, something the stores deliver beautifully. What some might consider boring, most Apple customers consider a reflection of this Apple philosophy/approach.

 

I think they could keep that focused approach while making their stores even better.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post


On the contrary: the more intimidating the better. The fewer people there are when I visit, the more pleasant the experience. Maybe they should introduce a quiet hour, where for a fee, you get to browse the shop with just a few people. Problem is, the fee would be astronomical to make up for the lost profits.

 

Lol. That's an elitist way of seeing things, but funny :)

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