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Microsoft's Office for iPad apps notch 27M downloads in 46 days

post #1 of 40
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After a highly anticipated launch in late March, Microsoft's Office for iPad suite of productivity apps is still going strong in the iOS App Store after having accumulated some 27 million downloads as of Monday.



In an announcement at the TechEd Conference on Monday, Microsoft's General Manager for Office Julia White said its iPad suite, which includes native Word, Excel and PowerPoint apps, has hit the 27 million download mark 46 days after its debut in March, reports Business Insider

The news comes after the Redmond, Wash.-based company announced another milestone for the software suite in early April, when it was learned that the collective iPad apps were downloaded 12 million times in one week.

The hotly-anticipated group of apps rocketed to the top of Apple's iOS App Store charts one day after launch and held their high ranking positions for some time. As of this writing, Word is still the fourth most-downloaded free iPad app, while Excel and PowerPoint have dropped to number 22 and 26 in the rankings, respectively.

Being so-called "freemium" apps, Microsoft requires users to purchase an in-app subscription to unlock full software capabilities. For Office, users can view documents for free, but need to have an Office 365 subscription to make edits.

Apple is taking the usual 30 percent cut of all subscription sign-ups, as is the company's policy for all in-app purchases. Office 365 subscriptions cost $99 per year or $9.99 per month.
post #2 of 40
27 million downloads. Ok good for both Apple and Microsoft.

Now let's get a report on how many ACTIVE/ users of these suites there are.
post #3 of 40

Meaningless without Office 365 subscriptions numbers to compare.

post #4 of 40

Its like test drive application. Its nothing with out Office 365.

post #5 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Amhran View Post

27 million downloads. Ok good for both Apple and Microsoft.

Now let's get a report on how many ACTIVE/ users of these suites there are.

That would be interesting number to see. My thinking would be that most already had alternative apps so 1 out of ten , at most, would end up being subscribers, still a big number.

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post #6 of 40

Just keep handing that 30% over to Apple.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #7 of 40
If 1 out of 10 signs up through App Store, apple stands to make 0.30$ per share just from that this quarter. If 33% then apple stands to make 1$ per share.
post #8 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Realistic View Post

That would be interesting number to see. My thinking would be that most already had alternative apps so 1 out of ten , at most, would end up being subscribers, still a big number.

Those who already have an Office 365 sub, purchased directly from MSFT, would be able to unlock these iPad apps with that sub. So the number of subs sold via in-app purchases could be very, very small. But that doesn't really matter. The big picture here is the further validation of the iPad in the enterprise and among MSFT Office customers. I doubt Apple cares much at all about the Office 365 in-app purchase revenue compared to this validation that confirms what we all knew; that the iPad is indeed a productivity tool as well as an information appliance.
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post #9 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

After a highly anticipated launch in late March, Microsoft's Office for iPad suite of productivity apps is still going strong in the iOS App Store after having accumulated some 27 million downloads as of Monday.

Apple is taking the usual 30 percent cut of all subscription sign-ups, as is the company's policy for all in-app purchases. Office 365 subscriptions cost $99 per year or $9.99 per month.

Love 'em or Hate 'em, these apps rule in business.

I thought I read somewhere the subscription price dropped twenty or thirty bucks a year from the above quote price.

Anyway, the ever-buggy "Word" apps leads the pack in downloads. Apple's Pages only needs about 20% more features than it has now to satisfy most of the users who are stuck on Word for College student paper needs, however, there will always be a place for some features Word offers.

Excel has it's place in some businesses too, where its features have unique applications. It may be harder for Apple to dislodge Excel in those places, but for a good swath of users, Numbers will get the job done.

Like many a power users I'm not interested in learning a new program when I don't need to do so, but if one is going to move to a touch interface, with a program really designed for that kind of interface, then Apple's iWork is best, albeit less full-featured.

Currently Microsoft is trying to shoehorn Office (which is highly dependent on a Mouse/Keyboard form of input) onto the "Touch" metaphor, and I'm not impressed with how messy they are doing that. Word was patched onto over and over for over 10 years, and now MS is patching a new interface on top of that pile of spaghetti code.

Apple, on the other hand, is adding back features as they can figure out how to add them most correctly for the "touch" interface. I'm not impressed with how leisurely they are going about doing that, although I see that route yielding the best results in the end for an easy app to learn and use.
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post #10 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post
 

Apple's Pages only needs about 20% more features than it has now to satisfy most of the users who are stuck on Word for College student paper needs...

Apparently, Apple really dropped the ball with respect to citations and bibliographies in the new Pages. It worked fine in Pages 2009 from what I have heard but now there are quite a few academics and researchers who are going back to Word for just those two features. Fortunately, my college paper writing days are long past. I still publish a lot of works but only in inDesign after the heavy lifting has been done by the doctors and engineers.

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post #11 of 40

But how much money have they made?

post #12 of 40
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Originally Posted by realcool View Post

If 1 out of 10 signs up through App Store, apple stands to make 0.30$ per share just from that this quarter. If 33% then apple stands to make 1$ per share.

27 million downloads - 10% of these is 2.7 million - $100/user is $270 million gross. Apple takes 30% or $81 million.  Share count is current 877 million so more like $.10 per share.

post #13 of 40

How many of those downloads were deleted, like mine, and never used after realizing it's a waste of money and no trial, in contrast to iWork?!

post #14 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by j1h15233 View Post
 

But how much money have they made?

App revenue is not a disclosed iTunes/App Store statistic. 

 

That said, MS Word is ranked #31 in the top grossing iPad apps, MS Excel is #71. Top grossing is a category that includes in-app purchases versus top paid which is the category that tracks apps that require a purchase initially.

 

Previous Microsoft Office 365 subscribers would not count in the top grossing category, because there would be no in-app purchase; the same would go for enterprise Office users.

 

The presence of these MS Office apps on the iPad top grossing list is solely due to people who downloaded the apps and purchased an Office 365 subscription from the app itself. 

 

It is worth noting that an Office 365 subscription key can be purchased from Amazon for about ~$65-70.


Edited by mpantone - 5/12/14 at 6:32pm
post #15 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianloftus View Post
 

27 million downloads - 10% of these is 2.7 million - $100/user is $270 million gross. Apple takes 30% or $81 million.  Share count is current 877 million so more like $.10 per share.

I can't argue with your arithmetic, but I enjoy the recollection that there was something of a Mexican standoff between Steve Balmer and Tim Cook.  Balmer said, "The iPad needs Office so we won't pay you the 30%.  You'll give us a better deal because we're special."  And Tim Cook responded with:  "Office needs the iPad and Microsoft is not special;  you're just another developer."  We didn't see Office on the iPad for a long time after that, but now Redmond blinked and Balmer's a Has Been.  

 

In other words, it doesn't matter how much money it is precisely.  It's enough that neither Redmond nor Cupertino wanted to give it up, and when the dust settled, the best company won!

post #16 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianloftus View Post

27 million downloads - 10% of these is 2.7 million - $100/user is $270 million gross. Apple takes 30% or $81 million.  Share count is current 877 million so more like $.10 per share.
My mistake - used 4.6 mil which was 46 days. You also made a mistake, you have to double that as it's only half quarter.
post #17 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Apparently, Apple really dropped the ball with respect to citations and bibliographies in the new Pages. It worked fine in Pages 2009 from what I have heard but now there are quite a few academics and researchers who are going back to Word for just those two features. Fortunately, my college paper writing days are long past. I still publish a lot of works but only in inDesign after the heavy lifting has been done by the doctors and engineers.

 

Apple dropped the ball with a lot of features, and has been bringing several back with each new release. I've been waiting for ages for them to restore linked text boxes. I think the challenge they are having is the web version of the app. Since they want feature parity across all platforms, then none of them get a feature that not all can support. I'm not sure how they would support flowing text across multiple boxes in a web app, that would be quite a trick!

 

I frequently let them know what I want from the app:

www.apple.com/feedback/

post #18 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Excel has it's place in some businesses too, where its features have unique applications. It may be harder for Apple to dislodge Excel in those places, but for a good swath of users, Numbers will get the job done.

 

Uh, no.

 

Numbers is completely inadequate as spreadsheet.  It's not even in the same league as Excel.

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

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post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Numbers is completely inadequate as spreadsheet.  It's not even in the same league as Excel.

I actually find Numbers to be quite useful for my spreadsheet needs. I haven't encountered anything that I wish it did that Excel does. But if there's applications that are missing that I am not aware of, then hey, always room for improvement, eh?
post #20 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Uh, no.
Numbers is completely inadequate as spreadsheet.  It's not even in the same league as Excel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlashFan207 View Post

I actually find Numbers to be quite useful for my spreadsheet needs. I haven't encountered anything that I wish it did that Excel does. But if there's applications that are missing that I am not aware of, then hey, always room for improvement, eh?

And this is why I made the comment I made. For many users Numbers will do all they need, but if a person needs and uses the more powerful features of Excel, then nothing can take its place. All that said, there are a good many problems where even Excel falls short.
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post #21 of 40

I downloaded Microsoft's Office for iPad just to take a look, but I didn't signup for it.

post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Apparently, Apple really dropped the ball with respect to citations and bibliographies in the new Pages. It worked fine in Pages 2009 from what I have heard but now there are quite a few academics and researchers who are going back to Word for just those two features. Fortunately, my college paper writing days are long past. I still publish a lot of works but only in inDesign after the heavy lifting has been done by the doctors and engineers.

 

In the old days (me) you had to spent a hell of lot of time writing citations and bibliographies for term papers using typewriters, in the computer age any text editor, word processor, will do the job quite easy.

post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Uh, no.

Numbers is completely inadequate as spreadsheet.  It's not even in the same league as Excel.
Uh no!, What an inadequate comment. In many aspects Excel is inferior to Numbers. In some aspects it's the just the other way around. In my case, I use them both. Depending my needs, I use one or the other. They are more complementary than most people assume.
post #24 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Currently Microsoft is trying to shoehorn Office (which is highly dependent on a Mouse/Keyboard form of input) onto the "Touch" metaphor, and I'm not impressed with how messy they are doing that. Word was patched onto over and over for over 10 years, and now MS is patching a new interface on top of that pile of spaghetti code.

Apple, on the other hand, is adding back features as they can figure out how to add them most correctly for the "touch" interface. I'm not impressed with how leisurely they are going about doing that, although I see that route yielding the best results in the end for an easy app to learn and use.

 

You do realise that Microsoft designed Office for iPad from scratch, don't you? Microsoft hasn't shoehorned existing desktop Office at all. Office for iPad has been designed for touch from the outset. That's why it gets excellent reviews.

post #25 of 40
I'm an Office 365 business subscriber, but I deleted these useless apps after trying them out because they are tied to using OneDrive. And OneDrive Business doesn't play well with other things I use (like OSX and iOS Apps) so I use Dropbox. Which Office for iPad doesn't support. At all.

What a way to completely cock up a good idea.
post #26 of 40
Will Microsoft have to add a rap spellchecker as part of its agreement with Apple?
 
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post #27 of 40

People, please. Stop making up numbers. Its not 1 in 10. More like 1 in 10000.

 

But without official numbers, its all meaningless. And the only reason to not boast the new subscription numbers, is because they suck. If they told you those numbers instead, this launch would look like an utter failure.

 

Instead they tell you how many Free downloads of a non functional app took place. Whoopty Doo.

post #28 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post
 

 

Uh, no.

 

Numbers is completely inadequate as spreadsheet.  It's not even in the same league as Excel.

I agree with you to a point.  There are a small number of power users that actually use Excel and its great features.  98% of users Numbers is overkill for their skill set.  I see it all the time in the corporate world where people use 1% of what Excel can do.

post #29 of 40
I already have an Office 365 subscription so when I downloaded it to both of my iPads (mine and my wife's) it was ready to go. The licensing allows me to have it on five desktop PC's PLUS five mobile devices. I suspect that there are many others like me as well as corporations that have licensing as well. Apple really isn't concerned about making money on the licensing and Microsoft has figured out that they aren't going to lose that much money through Apple based licensing. I suspect that this was a huge hurdle in the negotiations between the two companies and kept the apps from the AppStore for way too long.

These are well designed, feature-rich apps. They have gone through a mature development cycle so Microsoft has been working on them for a long time. Although I personally think Microsoft made a mistake in holding Office for iPad back, probably through Ballmer's arrogance, the result is a great set of apps.

My biggest complaint is that you are required to use Microsoft's OneDrive for cloud storage and aren't able to print to a Wi-Fi printer from the apps on the iPad.
post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


Love 'em or Hate 'em, these apps rule in business.

I thought I read somewhere the subscription price dropped twenty or thirty bucks a year from the above quote price.

Anyway, the ever-buggy "Word" apps leads the pack in downloads. Apple's Pages only needs about 20% more features than it has now to satisfy most of the users who are stuck on Word for College student paper needs, however, there will always be a place for some features Word offers.

Excel has it's place in some businesses too, where its features have unique applications. It may be harder for Apple to dislodge Excel in those places, but for a good swath of users, Numbers will get the job done.

Like many a power users I'm not interested in learning a new program when I don't need to do so, but if one is going to move to a touch interface, with a program really designed for that kind of interface, then Apple's iWork is best, albeit less full-featured.

Currently Microsoft is trying to shoehorn Office (which is highly dependent on a Mouse/Keyboard form of input) onto the "Touch" metaphor, and I'm not impressed with how messy they are doing that. Word was patched onto over and over for over 10 years, and now MS is patching a new interface on top of that pile of spaghetti code.

Apple, on the other hand, is adding back features as they can figure out how to add them most correctly for the "touch" interface. I'm not impressed with how leisurely they are going about doing that, although I see that route yielding the best results in the end for an easy app to learn and use.

 

Microsoft wrote the iPad Office apps from scratch with the touch interface in mind. These apps are designed to be more touch-centric and not rely on a mouse or external keyboard. The code for Office on iOS is completely rewritten since it's on a different operating system (iOS vs. Windows) a different processor (custom ARM vs. Intel) and a different developer environment. One of the complaints from the Windows community is that the touch enabled version of Office became available for the iPad before Windows. In my opinion this is probably due to (a) the ability to start fresh with new code (b) not be bogged down by the overhead of the Windows system (c) the efficiency of iOS and the tools that Apple provides.

 

I have been using the iPad Office products since they were released. I am amazed how well they are suited for the touch environment and how efficient they are.  There's no sign of "spaghetti code".

post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post
 
Apple dropped the ball with a lot of features, and has been bringing several back with each new release. I've been waiting for ages for them to restore linked text boxes. I think the challenge they are having is the web version of the app. Since they want feature parity across all platforms, then none of them get a feature that not all can support. I'm not sure how they would support flowing text across multiple boxes in a web app, that would be quite a trick!

Maybe not so difficult. There is a div property called overflow. You would need to use that to figure out how much of a text block needs to move to another div. That is just sudo-code but I can definitely see it working out. I have been using Google Mail and I am totally amazed what they have accomplished with Javascript.

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post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danox View Post
 
In the old days (me) you had to spent a hell of lot of time writing citations and bibliographies for term papers using typewriters, in the computer age any text editor, word processor, will do the job quite easy.

Sure you can write anything you want in Pages but before you could manage your citations as they were linked and automatically updated. I never used that feature but that is my partial understanding of the current issue. You can no longer manage the citations in the way you could before.

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post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Amhran View Post

27 million downloads. Ok good for both Apple and Microsoft.

Now let's get a report on how many ACTIVE/ users of these suites there are.

Exactly. Smoke and mirrors with out that information.
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post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnbob1 View Post
 

 

Microsoft wrote the iPad Office apps from scratch with the touch interface in mind. These apps are designed to be more touch-centric and not rely on a mouse or external keyboard. The code for Office on iOS is completely rewritten since it's on a different operating system (iOS vs. Windows) a different processor (custom ARM vs. Intel) and a different developer environment. One of the complaints from the Windows community is that the touch enabled version of Office became available for the iPad before Windows. In my opinion this is probably due to (a) the ability to start fresh with new code (b) not be bogged down by the overhead of the Windows system (c) the efficiency of iOS and the tools that Apple provides.

 

I have been using the iPad Office products since they were released. I am amazed how well they are suited for the touch environment and how efficient they are.  There's no sign of "spaghetti code".


Well then, let me apologize for speaking so critically of the dev group at MS for their hard work. Earlier I saw Office Excel running on the Surface RT and was shocked at what a kluge-job it was. Not touch friendly except in the most liberal sense of the word. I assume you are running the apps fully enabled so you can create and modify Word & Excel documents... if so, how intuitive did you find the programs to be? Did they follow Apple's design guidelines and act like other touch apps?

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post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post

Will Microsoft have to add a rap spellchecker as part of its agreement with Apple?

 

No, you will need to write one for your own use.  ;)

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post #36 of 40
You didn't read my reply very carefully. It referred to the iPad version of Office not the RT version. The RT version is a direct port of the Windows version laid on top of a kludged version of Windows. It has no touch modifications and actually runs in desktop mode. There is no comparison. The Windows community is unhappy that MS doesn't have the touch version ready yet.
post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnbob1 View Post

You didn't read my reply very carefully. It referred to the iPad version of Office not the RT version. The RT version is a direct port of the Windows version laid on top of a kludged version of Windows. It has no touch modifications and actually runs in desktop mode. There is no comparison. The Windows community is unhappy that MS doesn't have the touch version ready yet.

Including the desktop on Windows RT was a very stupid decision on Microsoft's part. 

post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ezhik View Post
 

Including the desktop on Windows RT was a very stupid decision on Microsoft's part. 

I completely agree. Unfortunately MS had to include it because their developers were unable to take care of some basic Windows tasks like control panel, explorer, and notepad. It also needs to be there to support legacy apps that don't run on the modern interface. I have no clue for the reason why MS hasn't updated their own utilities. It could be (a) they ran out of time. In which case they should have been able to catch up by now. (b) There's a technical issue related to the use of legacy Windows code. (c) Market testing shows low level of user acceptance (d)  They screwed up with the RT product and it's going to disappear in the very near future and development has been stopped.

 

My money is on D. I think I read that Microsoft is the only one still making hardware for RT. All the other OEM's have dropped out because it's a bad product, MS was charging too much for licensing, and nobody is buying it because it's not "real" Windows. MS should have branded it with another name because of the confusion in the mind of the consumer. Oh, and it's overpriced.

post #39 of 40

I think Microsoft, in its stupid internal wars, just did not do things fast enough. I doubt RT will disappear, as it now also powers Windows Phone, which, while not really that popular, isn't in danger of disappearing.

 

I guess RT will live on with Microsoft's own hardware, and if Microsoft keeps playing its cards right, and hurries up with updating its core apps to take advantage of the RT platform, perhaps they could achieve something.

 

But I think this was their wakeup call, they can see clearly that Office alone can't sell now.

post #40 of 40
27 million downloads, 27 million deletions. Who wants to pay $99/year when you can get for FREE(Evernote, iWork, etc..).
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