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Apple sued over text messaging issues related to switching away from iPhone - Page 3

post #81 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Then this wouldn't be an issue as you are still receiving your messages.

Before you switch remove your device.

I'm not following.

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post #82 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grey Silvy View Post

She will use her winnings to buy a new iPhone....LMAO

I switched to an S4 last year and nothing happened. I think and would bet she didn't take the time to disassociate her iCloud account with her phone number and didn't reset/erase the phone before she traded it.

 

I regularly switch between an S4 and my 5s without issues either.

 

There are alternatives if you don't like Apple's free messaging service, whatsapp, viber etc.

 

Wait until you see the mess having several of those linked to your Android contacts can make.

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post #83 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I'm not following.

You specified a user who wants to continue using the phone number to receive iMessages on other Apple devices.

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post #84 of 178
The simple way to do this, if you no longer have the device, is to go to https://supportprofile.apple.com/ and log in with your Apple ID, then deactivate your old phone. Quite simple really, and quicker and cheaper than a court case.
post #85 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

You specified a user who wants to continue using the phone number to receive iMessages on other Apple devices.

So why isn't that a problem if you only had an iPhone and no other Apple device in which to receive an iMessage? The bottom line is there needs to be a system in place in which you remove a device or a device and phone number.


edit: The original reply was based on incorrectly readying your comment to say "on non Apple devices."

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post #86 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

So why isn't that a problem if you only had an iPhone and no other Apple device in which to receive an iMessage? The bottom line is there needs to be a system in place in which you remove a device or a device and phone number."

In case you didn't see the post above, there is a simple way. Use a computer that is connected to the internet to go to https://supportprofile.apple.com/ and log in with your Apple ID, then deactivate your old phone. Quite simple really, and quicker and cheaper than a court case
post #87 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by leighr View Post

In case you didn't see the post above, there is a simple way. Use a computer that is connected to the internet to go to https://supportprofile.apple.com/ and log in with your Apple ID, then deactivate your old phone. Quite simple really, and quicker and cheaper than a court case

I hadn't seen that. Thanks.

I also didn't know that existed or had forgotten about it which still leads me to the same conclusion that there should be a more obvious solution. But I agree the lawsuit is unnecessary, but I also feel that way about most of these lawsuits.


PS: I had a crap load of devices on there. My original iPhone, iPad and Apple TV were all on there as well over a dozen more devices.

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post #88 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by leighr View Post

In case you didn't see the post above, there is a simple way. Use a computer that is connected to the internet to go to https://supportprofile.apple.com/ and log in with your Apple ID, then deactivate your old phone. Quite simple really, and quicker and cheaper than a court case

That doesn't always work 100% of the time. People have done that and still don't receive texts.
post #89 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

Nevermine.. I see that you were talking about iCloud.com (Find my iPhone).

I am not sure this will work.

Go to iMessage in settings and then remove all your email addresses and deactivate your phone number.
post #90 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonX View Post

I'm glad to see that there are many intelligent posters who recognize that this is a real problem.  This is a big issue for the people affected, and it is entirely Apple's fault.  The many posters who automatically screamed "frivolous lawsuit!" or "PBKAC!" really sicken me.  

And I also agree that those same people would be screaming bloody murder if Samsung were doing this to iPhone switchers.

You should retread his post before trying to show you are clever.
post #91 of 178
In related news, Adrienne Moore is sued for being so stupid as to trade in an iPhone for a POS Samsung android phone.
post #92 of 178

just don't log on iMessage using Apple ID, but your phone # only.

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post #93 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by leighr View Post

The simple way to do this, if you no longer have the device, is to go to https://supportprofile.apple.com/ and log in with your Apple ID, then deactivate your old phone. Quite simple really, and quicker and cheaper than a court case.


Indeed, that is the way to do it:

Go to: https://supportprofile.apple.com/MySupportProfile.do
Log in if not already logged in.
Click on "edit products"
Click on the "x" to the right of the product.
Click "unregister"
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post #94 of 178
What? People trade in iPhones for Android phones? Why would you do that? Like "Hey, can I trade in my Mercedes for a Honda?"
post #95 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam_Apple View Post

What? People trade in iPhones for Android phones? Why would you do that? Like "Hey, can I trade in my Mercedes for a Honda?"

 

Better analogy is trading in a smart car for a regular car.

post #96 of 178

I don't think that's a better analogy at all, Smart cars suck.

post #97 of 178

The real reason that messages disappeared, this should be obvious, is that they were too embarrassed to be seen on a Scamsung device. Should be suing Giggle. :wow: 

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post #98 of 178
1. No one is automatically opted in to IMessage. If you have an IPhone, you can choose to leave IMessage off, and it will simply treat all text messages as normal SMS, so, it will not recognize other iOS Devices as sending an IMessage.

2. If you restore your phone and do not restore a backup, then you will no longer be signed in to IMessage.

3. You can go to www.icloud.com, remove your device, and deactivate that way.

Also, as previously stated, you also will want to go to supportprofile.apple.com and remove the device there.

Also, remember to turn off IMessage on any other devices that are using that same Apple ID.

4. If you change the password for your Apple ID, then the next time the server goes to validate your Apple ID for use with IMessage, it will prompt for the new password to be entered in order to continue to use IMessage. If you do not put in the new password, the server will delete your number as being an IMessage activated number.

5. If none of the above works, you can contact AppleCare to have them remove your phone number from IMessage.

6. Have both yourself AND the person sending you the message erase the existing message thread and begin a new one.
post #99 of 178
The irreparable harm was caused by switching from iOS to Android, just as you would expect.
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post #100 of 178
That will always be a feature of the walled garden Apple policy.
If you want to interact with the outside world then you should learn before quitting.

I guess with Apple interfering with SMS, it could be argued that Apple are intentionally undermining a feature of the more open world.
They could have made iMessage more world wide web compatible, but it is really there to compete against 'open'.
post #101 of 178
After 3 years do you really think Apple were even half interested in doing in a fix?
post #102 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

I think this lady actually thought she will will be able to receive iMessages after switching to Android.  This is like the smartphone kill mechanism many Android users want that they coerced lawmakers to force smartphone makers to implement it although I think Apple has a patent.  

She thought she could continue receiving text messages. There should be a end user handshake that ensures a message got through, if the handshake doesn’t happen then the message should be resent via SMS. It's not that hard.
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post #103 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I hadn't seen that. Thanks.

I also didn't know that existed or had forgotten about it which still leads me to the same conclusion that there should be a more obvious solution. But I agree the lawsuit is unnecessary, but I also feel that way about most of these lawsuits.


PS: I had a crap load of devices on there. My original iPhone, iPad and Apple TV were all on there as well over a dozen more devices.

There should be one single place to go and deactivate a phone. I've already read about 5 different "all you have to do" solutions.
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post #104 of 178

This is the most pathetic and desperate attempt I've seen to make a quick buck and grab some attention...

 

It is very simple.. Regardless of where her "sim card" came from whether it be that the sim card came with her iPhone or she placed it in the iPhone from another device; When she activated the iPhone, she created a iCloud account, she activated iMessage willingly and had communicated effectively with her contacts that also use the same features, iPhone, iPad, Mac. 

 

When this woman decided to just yank the sim card out and place it in a non-iPhone device, it seems to be that she never deactivated her iCloud account from being associated with iMessage and simply just place the sim card into the non-iPhone device which is fine and that won't interfere with her sending SMS to contacts that are using only SMS, furthermore it too won't interfere with her sending SMS to contacts that use iMessage if they have "SMS" activated along with "iMessage" but if she and the recipient held any previous conversation with iMessage and she sends them an SMS from the non-iPhone device and they reply in the same window using their iPhone or other Apple device that uses the same iMessage service, by default their device will attempt to send their message as iMessage and if this women's iPhone she formerly used is connected to wifi and her iCloud account is assigned to iMessage which is also still activated than those message will be sent to iMessage and ignore her SMS.

 

If this womann had half the brain it took to file this law suit (if this is the case) than she should undo the settings that she, herself took to activate iMessage so that she may use SMS without any possible inference!

 

 

This lawsuit will more than likely be dismissed and never reach "class status" 

 

Chase~

post #105 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

There should be one single place to go and deactivate a phone. I've already read about 5 different "all you have to do" solutions.

The problem with these "all you have to do" solutions is NOT the complexity (or rather, lack thereof) in the steps detailed but the fact that people simply don't know they exist. How many people that read this site immediately upon seeing the article thought to themselves, "Just go to supportprofile.apple.com"? I didn't even know it existed and I consider myself fairly well versed in Apple's products and services and have no qualms about doing a modicum of research to find a solution. How is it this site has escaped me for so long?

Since it's the same login as your iCloud ID I don't see why all this can't be organized under the same site. Even if it needs a portal put a Settings icon in iCloud that will allow you to access all your registered devices. And perhaps, at least, a modal view on the iPhone that warns you that if you're disabling iMessage for a phone number that you'll still receive iMessages to that number unless you deactivate your device, even though I'd rather it just be smart enough to know when you no longer have a device registered with iMessage that is accepting of a phone number as a valid address.
Edited by SolipsismX - 5/17/14 at 10:06am

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post #106 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by usarmyctr View Post

If this womann had half the brain it took to file this law suit (if this is the case) than she should undo the settings that she, herself took to activate iMessage so that she may use SMS without any possible inference!

I see nothing about switching SIM cards in a phone that indicates she doesn't have a brain. Isn't SIM card switch the method that telcos instruct you to switch devices for the same account?

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post #107 of 178

Okay-- 

 

 

Well, you suggest that resolving issues is a matter of "complexity" however, it wasn't so complex or perhaps it was when you or this women set up iMessage and the same steps you took to set it up are the same ones you take to deactivate the feature!

 

You say "complexity in the steps detailed but the fact that people simply don't know they exist."

 

To that I say... You and others had fair enough common sense to set up features and you and other should use the same common sense to turn the features off!

 

No need to read "support forums" 

 

Follow the steps you took to activate features and services in reverse... Very simple eh?!

 

Chase

post #108 of 178

The issue is not with her "sim card"

 

My post in this forum more than cover the issue. (read all) 

post #109 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by usarmyctr View Post

Okay-- 


Well, you suggest that resolving issues is a matter of "complexity" however, it wasn't so complex or perhaps it was when you or this women set up iMessage and the same steps you took to set it up are the same ones you take to deactivate the feature!

You say "complexity in the steps detailed but the fact that people simply don't know they exist."

To that I say... You and others had fair enough common sense to set up features and you and other should use the same common sense to turn the features off!

No need to read "support forums" 

Follow the steps you took to activate features and services in reverse... Very simple eh?!

Chase

Aren't these features activated by simply clicking a switch on the device? If activation was that simple why isn't deactivation just as simple?
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post #110 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by usarmyctr View Post

This is the most pathetic and desperate attempt I've seen to make a quick buck and grab some attention...

It is very simple.. Regardless of where her "sim card" came from whether it be that the sim card came with her iPhone or she placed it in the iPhone from another device; When she activated the iPhone, she created a iCloud account, she activated iMessage willingly and had communicated effectively with her contacts that also use the same features, iPhone, iPad, Mac. 

When this woman decided to just yank the sim card out and place it in a non-iPhone device, it seems to be that she never deactivated her iCloud account from being associated with iMessage and simply just place the sim card into the non-iPhone device which is fine and that won't interfere with her sending SMS to contacts that are using only SMS, furthermore it too won't interfere with her sending SMS to contacts that use iMessage if they have "SMS" activated along with "iMessage" but if she and the recipient held any previous conversation with iMessage and she sends them an SMS from the non-iPhone device and they reply in the same window using their iPhone or other Apple device that uses the same iMessage service, by default their device will attempt to send their message as iMessage and if this women's iPhone she formerly used is connected to wifi and her iCloud account is assigned to iMessage which is also still activated than those message will be sent to iMessage and ignore her SMS.

If this womann had half the brain it took to file this law suit (if this is the case) than she should undo the settings that she, herself took to activate iMessage so that she may use SMS without any possible inference!


This lawsuit will more than likely be dismissed and never reach "class status" 

Chase~

Quote:
Originally Posted by usarmyctr View Post

Okay-- 


Well, you suggest that resolving issues is a matter of "complexity" however, it wasn't so complex or perhaps it was when you or this women set up iMessage and the same steps you took to set it up are the same ones you take to deactivate the feature!

You say "complexity in the steps detailed but the fact that people simply don't know they exist."

To that I say... You and others had fair enough common sense to set up features and you and other should use the same common sense to turn the features off!

No need to read "support forums" 

Follow the steps you took to activate features and services in reverse... Very simple eh?!

Chase

And yet, even doing all that doesn't work all the time. People have done the correct steps and still can't receive text.
post #111 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


The problem with these "all you have to do" solutions is the complexity in the steps detailed but the fact that people simply don't know they exist. How many people that read this site immediately upon seeing the article thought to themselves, "Just do supportprofile.apple.com"? I didn't even know it existed and I consider myself fairly well versed in Apple's products and services and have no qualms about doing a modicum of research to find a solution. How is it this site has escaped me for so long?

Since it's the same login as your iCloud ID I don't see why all this can't be organized under the same site. Even if it needs a portal put a Settings icon in iCloud that will allow you to access all your registered devices. And perhaps, at least, a modal view on the iPhone that warns you that if you're disabling iMessage for a phone number that you'll still receive iMessages to that number unless you deactivate your device, even though I'd rather it just be smart enough to know when you no longer have a device registered with iMessage that is accepting of a phone number as a valid address.

Agree with this whole heartedly, and, since I've also just discovered this http://supportprofile.apple.com site, and a couple of sadly missed products registered to me on there, I'd also like for the portal to allow you to report a device as stolen.

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post #112 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

The irreparable harm was caused by switching from iOS to Android, just as you would expect.

Would've happened switching to any other mobile OS.  The fault was with the source, not the destination.  Nice try though.

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post #113 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by usarmyctr View Post

Well, you suggest that resolving issues is a matter of "complexity" however, it wasn't so complex or perhaps it was when you or this women set up iMessage and the same steps you took to set it up are the same ones you take to deactivate the feature!

She signed into iMessage on her iPhone to add the phone number. As noted simply signing out of iMessage on her iPhone doesn't remove that phone number from the iMessage server.

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post #114 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

I think suing is way over the top, but this is a problem for which Apple needs to develop a better solution. It's too easy to be ignorant of the fact that - or to forget that - you need to deactivate iMessage before moving to a different type of phone.

Similarly, it can be easy, when selling a device, to forget to deactivate it for iTunes purchases. Normally, you can only deactivate a device from that specific device, but if you've already sold it, it can be too late. In that case, Apple offers a mechanism that allows you to deactivate all devices, via a log-in to your iTunes account from any device, and the effect is immediate. They need some way that a user can deactivate iMessage without needing the actual device and without having to wait for 45 days.

I think that's a wise description of the situation. I'm an unapologetic Apple fan but I think this is very bad PR for the company. If another phone maker was doing this the howls of anguish on this forum would be unimaginable because people would suspect it was intentional. Fix is needed.
post #115 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post

That will always be a feature of the walled garden Apple policy.
If you want to interact with the outside world then you should learn before quitting.

I guess with Apple interfering with SMS, it could be argued that Apple are intentionally undermining a feature of the more open world.
They could have made iMessage more world wide web compatible, but it is really there to compete against 'open'.

That would be another way to resolve it, yes. Either release iMessage for all platforms (and keep it closed source) or just make it open source and allow others to make apps for their platforms. However, AFAIK, iMessage is powered by Apple's server farm, so unless they're willing to service everyone for free, or create some kind of payment system for other platforms, or open up the back-end to competitors is something that has to be addressed. It's not a peer-to-peer system. And the problem with opening up the protocol is that there would be nothing to stop mobile carriers from saying: ok, iMessage is the new SMS, so we can charge you per message (or per device).

(And of course as a non-Apple user you are forgiven for misunderstanding that iMessage does not interfere with SMS at all--as an iPhone user, I can force my iPhone to send SMS to another iPhone if I really wanted to, but I don't)

And contrary to what you might think, Apple has put technologies into open source, most notably WebKit and the Darwin kernel.

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post #116 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

She thought she could continue receiving text messages. There should be a end user handshake that ensures a message got through, if the handshake doesn’t happen then the message should be resent via SMS. It's not that hard.

What you are describing is what happens if you properly unregister your iPhone and other iMessage devices from your iCloud account. I know because I have a friend who did just that: switched to android, but cleanly unregistered. After that, when I send him a message, it tries to send via iMessage, fails the handshake (because iMessage tracks that) and then my iPhone will automatically resend the message as SMS a few seconds later. I have seen it work as design. And this feature has been there since at least the iMessage in iOS 6. So no, what you are describing is not that hard because that's how iMessage works already.

The issue is about people who don't properly unregister their device from iMessage before selling or disposing of it. I believe Apple hasn't done enough to make it easy for Apple users to unregister a device--I proposed that one should be able to login to iCloud and do it over the Web.

I don't believe, however, that lawsuits are the solution, unless Apple customer service flat out told these customers there was nothing Apple could/would do about it, or if the company promised and failed to deliver a fix. Then sue Apple.

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post #117 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post

I guess with Apple interfering with SMS, it could be argued that Apple are intentionally undermining a feature of the more open world.

There is no evidence to support Apple is intentionally interfering with SMS. If that were the case they could have not included it with iOS in the first place or removed it after iMessage was added. Are they intentionally undermining it? Well, creating an alternative system to SMS/MMS is evidence enough of that but you could also say that WebKit undermined IE and Firefox's marketshare and iOS undermined Symbian and WinMo's marketshare, but the notion that being a competitor is wrong isn't a reasonable argument anyone should take.

What we have here is iOS defaulting to the free and more versatile iMessage over the archaic and costly SMS service. That's it. Although Apple should change their system so it's more intelligent and easier for a customer to remove a device there is no proof of any skullduggery.

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post #118 of 178
It would be versatile if it worked cross platform.

If users were more slow to adopt iMessage would by now have adapted to the real world.
post #119 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post

It would be versatile if it worked cross platform.

It is. iOS and Mac OS X. Why does it need to work outside of Apple's OSes? If you want that there are plenty of options on the App Store that are universal, like AIM, or the Jabber-based IMs like GTalk.
Quote:
If users were more slow to adopt iMessage would by now have adapted to the real world.

No idea what this means, but iMessage adoption has been extremely fast. Perhaps even the fastest adopted messaging system in the world.

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post #120 of 178


The answer is easy. Just tell her friends to turn on send message as SMS when iMessage is not available.
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