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Apple explains enhanced 4K monitor support built into OS X 10.9.3

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
In an update to a support document on Friday, Apple offers details on the changes and improvements -- including expanded display compatibility -- made to 4K monitor support under the company's latest OS X Mavericks 10.9.3 release.



According to Apple's "Using 4K displays and Ultra HD TVs with Mac computers" support page, the latest OS X 10.9.3 version can pump out a 30 Hz picture over single-stream transport (SST) to Dell's UP2414Q and UP3214Q displays, as well as Panasonic's TC-L65WT600. This function was previously limited to Sharp's PN-K321 and the ASUS PQ321Q.

Further, the late 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina display and late 2013 Mac Pro now support the above displays at 60 Hz refresh rates using multi-stream transport (MST). The support document offers instruction on how to get the 4K screens to function accordingly, since most ship with MST turned off by default to enhance compatibility with older computers.

In addition to the expanded display support, Apple also offers instruction on adjusting attached screens to best fit content to available real estate. As seen in the graphic above, which is a screenshot of OS X 10.9.3's Display Settings, Apple now uses an icon-based scaling selection user interface instead of just showing screen resolution numbers.

With the latest OS X Mavericks 10.9.3 release, Apple is quickly bringing its Mac operating system up to date with its latest hardware like the Retina MacBook Pro and redesigned Mac Pro.
post #2 of 18
Look at that screenshot of the settings window.. That monitor looks very appleish.. but never seen this type before...
post #3 of 18
It's probably the Dell or Panasonic which would be new but are definitely not Apple monitors
post #4 of 18

Since the Late 2013 MBP Retina now supports MST, will it be able to work with daisy chained DP monitors or MST hubs like this one?

 

http://www.accellcables.com/K088B-003B.html

post #5 of 18
"As seen in the graphic above, which is a screenshot of OS X 10.9.3's Display Settings, Apple now uses an icon-based scaling selection user interface instead of just showing screen resolution numbers."

The above was introduced when Mavericks was first released, AFAIK. It's definitely not new to 10.9.3
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by qo_ View Post

"As seen in the graphic above, which is a screenshot of OS X 10.9.3's Display Settings, Apple now uses an icon-based scaling selection user interface instead of just showing screen resolution numbers."

The above was introduced when Mavericks was first released, AFAIK. It's definitely not new to 10.9.3

It is for 4K.

post #7 of 18
I wonder how soon it will be till we see the IMac with these 4k upgrades, as well as MacBook Air and Mac mini in later modules.

Just wonder if they push all these software updates, then hardware should come out this year will this be apples retina 4k year or is it 2015?(as in IMac/cinema are 4k and MacBook Air is retina with descent 4k support.
post #8 of 18
It works great on my Dell UP2414Q (Superb monitor) and Samsung U28D590 (Ok monitor, but great value) with my Late 2013 15" rMBP.

I think the 24" panel in the UP2414Q would be perfectly suited to a retina iMac.
post #9 of 18
Apple, please, give us back exact screen dimensions. The Larger Text vs. More Space option is sometimes sufficient. But when working in screen or motion design it is crucial to know the pixel dimensions that are being represented on screen. This was possible for the last 20 years so please bring this back. And no, ctr- or alt-clicking doesn't seam to do the trick anymore. At least in my experience.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by glnf View Post

Apple, please, give us back exact screen dimensions. The Larger Text vs. More Space option is sometimes sufficient. But when working in screen or motion design it is crucial to know the pixel dimensions that are being represented on screen. This was possible for the last 20 years so please bring this back. And no, ctr- or alt-clicking doesn't seam to do the trick anymore. At least in my experience.

I agree. What would be the trouble in showing the numerical resolution in addition?
Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by hydr View Post

Look at that screenshot of the settings window.. That monitor looks very appleish.. but never seen this type before...

Its just a generic view, for my LG (non-4K) I have it displayed, but I still have the dimensions listed.

 

BTW I am wondering whether holding down the option key will show dimensions for 4K monitors. Also, they probably changed from dimension to visual samples, because the numbers are probably so big that they don't mean much to non-techies.

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by glnf View Post

Apple, please, give us back exact screen dimensions. The Larger Text vs. More Space option is sometimes sufficient. But when working in screen or motion design it is crucial to know the pixel dimensions that are being represented on screen. This was possible for the last 20 years so please bring this back. And no, ctr- or alt-clicking doesn't seam to do the trick anymore. At least in my experience.

 

On a Retina or 4K display if you move the mouse over one of those chiclets, it will display additional text under the monitor "Looks like X x Y".

 

http://anandtech.com/show/8023/apple-releases-osx-10-9-3-improved-4k-display

 

But I think it is annoying to have so many things hidden by default and exposed only when you hold the Option key:

In Finder, click Go and hold Option key to see your Library folder

In Finder copy file dialog, hold Option key to change between Skip and Keep Both

and many more mystery Option key shortcuts in Finder

In Displays preferences, hold Option key to show Detect Displays button

In Displays preferences, Option-click on Scaled to show more resolutions

 

It seems that with every new version of Mac OS more things are hidden, requiring the use of the Option key.  How are people supposed to know when the Option key will show something in a particular instance?  Few if any dialog boxes specifically display  a warning like "hold Option key for more choices".  Do people just have to hold Option every time they click on a menu, open a dialog box, or click on an item from now on, just to see if something will appear?

 

And people complain about things being hidden in Windows 8.


Edited by Haggar - 5/17/14 at 11:07am
post #13 of 18

Apple should release a 24-inch 4K display with Thunderbolt 2 and USB 3 as well as SDXC for flash memory cards.

post #14 of 18

I've been waiting for Apple to release a 4K 32" Apple Cinema Display with Thunderbolt 2. Maybe at WWDC next month?

post #15 of 18

Anybody try a late 2012 rMBP with one of these 4K monitors?  It supposedly can support 4K @ 30Hz, but can it do the scaling options?

post #16 of 18
Hold the option key when clicking "scaled." This is in the May revision of the document, which is not linked in this article.
Eph nMP, rMBP13&15, MBA, Minis, iPhone 3GS,4,4S,5,5S,6
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Eph nMP, rMBP13&15, MBA, Minis, iPhone 3GS,4,4S,5,5S,6
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post #17 of 18
Now if they would just modernize to the point of providing drivers for 10-bit color.
"Geeks of All Nations, Compile!" http://amusingfool.blogspot.com/
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"Geeks of All Nations, Compile!" http://amusingfool.blogspot.com/
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post #18 of 18
Do NOT get a 4K monitor if you have a Mac Mini Late 2012 or earlier!!! It will work on MacPros.

Also, if the Monitor is less than 36"...there is not point in getting this resolution for a "single monitor user" setup.
Multi-monitor...maybe...but 4K is not there yet!!

Enter the Discussion.

https://discussions.apple.com/thread/6361115
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