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Verizon's new XLTE network doubles bandwidth for users of Apple's latest iPhones & iPads

post #1 of 66
Thread Starter 
Verizon, America's largest wireless provider, announced on Monday the launch of its new XLTE network, an enhanced version of its 4G wireless data that offers double the previous speed available on the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c, as well as the LTE-compatible iPad Air and iPad mini with Retina display.




Verizon said its new XLTE network has launched in neighborhoods or areas where demand is high, covering markets in 44 out of 50 U.S. states. It's expected to help during especially busy periods like rush hour, lunch time, or in crowded areas.

The full list of XLTE markets includes New York City, Miami, Los Angeles, Seattle, Chicago and virtually every other major city in the country, along with dozens of smaller markets.

"The industry and tech world recognize this is a big deal, and we want consumers to know, too," said Ken Dixon, chief marketing officer of Verizon Wireless. "We continue to offer the very best network, bar none. Now, XLTE provides an even greater advantage to customers by doubling the 4G LTE bandwidth and providing faster peak speeds in cities coast to coast."



Verizon says its new XLTE network, which is available in markets where the AWS spectrum has been activated, will deliver double the bandwidth to customers with compatible devices, along with faster peak data speeds.

Customers with legacy LTE devices, such as Apple's iPhone 5, will also benefit from the extra capacity crated by XLTE capable devices moving to the AWS spectrum.
post #2 of 66

Yay! Now I can reach my usage cap twice as fast!

post #3 of 66
Well actually it's more than just for the Apple devices. It's for a wide range of devices on the Verizon network.

Phones

Moto X
DROID ULTRA
DROID MAXX
DROID MINI
HTC One (M8)
HTC One Max
LG G2
LG Lucid 3
Samsung Galaxy Note 3
Samsung Galaxy Galaxy S5
Samsung Galaxy S4
Samsung Galaxy S4 Mini
Samsung ATIV SE
Lumia Icon
Blackberry Q10
Blackberry Z30
iPhone 5C
iPhone 5S

Tablets

iPad Air
iPad Mini Retina
LG G Pad
Samsung Note 10.1
Samsung Galaxy Note Pro

Jetpacks and Modems

UML295 USB Modem
Jetpack MHS291L
Jetpack Mifi5510L
post #4 of 66
An article like this would benefit greatly if it were to state if the increased speed applies to download, upload or both. The commercial sort of suggests it applies to uploads: "for everyone to stream and share more".
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post #5 of 66

Always makes me question the results when companies use phrases such as "2x faster" or "up to x% faster". Unless you know the original speeds that the company is expecting, how can you prove it's faster.

post #6 of 66

Isn't this just the same thing Sprint did with their Spark service back in October? Basically putting LTE as accessible on a different spectrum. 

post #7 of 66

Double bandwidth to be equal to ATT? Nice. My ATT iPhone 5 got 25 mbps most of the times and closer to my work place in Santa Clara, I get >50 mpbs. Beat that, Verizon.

post #8 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallenjt View Post

Double bandwidth to be equal to ATT? Nice. My ATT iPhone 5 got 25 mbps most of the times and closer to my work place in Santa Clara, I get >50 mpbs. Beat that, Verizon.

Still no LTE in my area from AT&T in 2014 with my iPhone 5S when Verizon had it when I bought my iPhone 5. I had faster internet and better quality calls with my previous iPhone. That said, my fault for assuming AT&T would have updated their network by the time I switched back.

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post #9 of 66

 

I know people can post speedtests from the other carriers that are higher speeds but honestly I have never felt the need to go above 8Mbps on my phone. Videos and music streaming which have a far higher demand than web surfing work very well. I can't wait for the iPhone 6 that will support Sprint Spark which the 5 and 5s do not support since they do not support LTE on the 2.5Ghz spectrum. I am anxious not so much for the speed boost as how much greater coverage this will provide. 

post #10 of 66
Must be awesome to access your 2 GB cap even faster now!
post #11 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by msantti View Post

Must be awesome to access your 2 GB cap even faster now!

Lol, yep very good point which is why I am glad I still have an unlimited data plan. I am not even that heavy a user. Most of my data usage comes from streaming music whenever I am in the car so maybe an hour or 2 per day on average. Some occasional video usage, games, not a lot of web surfing and I went over 8GB last month. 

post #12 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post
 

Isn't this just the same thing Sprint did with their Spark service back in October? Basically putting LTE as accessible on a different spectrum. 

I don't think it's just the new spectrum.

 

Verizon was the first major US carrier to deploy LTE because their 3G EV-DO technology was a dead-end, whereas AT&T and T-Mobile had HSPA+ that they could migrate to before moving to LTE.

 

Being the first to market, Verizon used the LTE equipment available at the time, which has been superseded by better/faster generations of equipment.

 

At this point, Verizon is catching up to more recent AT&T and T-Mobile LTE deployments which used faster equipment as they adopted LTE later than Verizon.

post #13 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by msantti View Post

Must be awesome to access your 2 GB cap even faster now!

I keep hearing that but that doesn't seem to happen. So a website loads a little faster but my reading of a website isn't increasing as a result. And a 5 minute YouTube video still takes 5 minutes to watch even if it starts playing after 3 seconds instead of 5 seconds.

In fact, I'd say my usage has gone down because more of my usage is tied to apps which tend to use data more efficiently than a website that has to pull the entire UI from a server.

Now there is an eventual cause and effect scenario as faster data allows for complexity and "beefy" data to be loaded but until the faster data is the norm that isn't likely to happen because it would negatively affect the majority.

That leaves a couple seconds here and there where you could technically use that saved time for accessing more stuff thereby using more data as a consequence but who uses their device that way? I certainly don't. Despite my usage I have plenty of downtime with my iPhone because it's not a server running nonstop, 24/7.

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post #14 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

Lol, yep very good point which is why I am glad I still have an unlimited data plan. I am not even that heavy a user. Most of my data usage comes from streaming music whenever I am in the car so maybe an hour or 2 per day on average. Some occasional video usage, games, not a lot of web surfing and I went over 8GB last month. 

Unless you get an option for higher bit rate music your hour or two per day of streaming music will still be the same amount of data regardless of whether you have 4Mib/s or 4Gib/s Internet access between your iPhone and your streaming service, save for someone that want to skip songs constantly using a streaming service that loads the entire song as soon as it's chosen.

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post #15 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post
 

Lol, yep very good point which is why I am glad I still have an unlimited data plan. I am not even that heavy a user. Most of my data usage comes from streaming music whenever I am in the car so maybe an hour or 2 per day on average. Some occasional video usage, games, not a lot of web surfing and I went over 8GB last month. 

 

I got unlimited with T-Mobile.

 

Clearly not the fastest thing out there but it works okay. I am not to anal about it.

 

Price is pretty fair.

post #16 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I keep hearing that but that doesn't seem to happen. So a website loads a little faster but my reading of a website isn't increasing as a result. And a 5 minute YouTube video still takes 5 minutes to watch even if it starts playing after 3 seconds instead of 5 seconds.

In fact, I'd say my usage has gone down because more of my usage is tied to apps which tend to use data more efficiently than a website that has to pull the entire UI from a server.

Now there is an eventual cause and effect scenario as faster data allows for complexity and "beefy" data to be loaded but until the faster data is the norm that isn't likely to happen because it would negatively affect the majority.

That leaves a couple seconds here and there where you could technically use that saved time for accessing more stuff thereby using more data as a consequence but who uses their device that way? I certainly don't. Despite my usage I have plenty of downtime with my iPhone because it's not a server running nonstop, 24/7.

I agree with you on the point of diminishing returns in terms of raw speed but really disagree in terms of actual usage. After getting LTE over a year ago my usage has increased many fold and like I said above I think I am not a data hog. Most of my usage I am guessing comes from streaming internet radio which is likely at 128Kbps speed I think. Doing that around 90 minutes a day gets me to around 8GB per month give or take a few above or below that on average. With a 2GB cap I would have to vastly change how I use my iPhone and really monitor my usage far more carefully. 

post #17 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

I agree with you on the point of diminishing returns in terms of raw speed but really disagree in terms of actual usage. After getting LTE over a year ago my usage has increased many fold and like I said above I think I am not a data hog. Most of my usage I am guessing comes from streaming internet radio which is likely at 128Kbps speed I think. Doing that around 90 minutes a day gets me to around 8GB per month give or take a few above or below that on average. With a 2GB cap I would have to vastly change how I use my iPhone and really monitor my usage far more carefully. 

At 128kib/s streaming music can be easily handled by nearly all versions* of the '3G' standard. It sounds like you changed how you used your device but I see nothing that was not possible with the previous '3G' iPhones.


* '3G' can be as low as 384kib/s which could handle 128kib/s streaming music under the right conditions but is say at 8x that capacity of the bitrate is what I would consider the minimum.

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post #18 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Unless you get an option for higher bit rate music your hour or two per day of streaming music will still be the same amount of data regardless of whether you have 4Mib/s or 4Gib/s Internet access between your iPhone and your streaming service, save for someone that want to skip songs constantly using a streaming service that loads the entire song as soon as it's chosen.

 

I posted my reply above before I saw yours. I am definitely a song skipper. I am not really sure how the internet radio services work. I believe iTunes radio is streaming at 256K if I am not mistaken which can really chew through some data quickly. My usage patterns have not changed with LTE but my data usage has gone up considerably so I attribute this to far higher quality audio and video streams. They sure sound better in my car to my ears at least. I can say this much with near certainty. I would have a very hard time staying below 2GB without some serious changes in my routine of using my iPhone. I say this because I also was rarely if ever under 2GB with only 3G. 

post #19 of 66
Considering that (real) 4g is a 100/Mbs technology... are they saying that this will now be 200/Mbs... or are they talking about doubling LTE Advanced which has download speeds of up to 1 Gbit/s making it now 2 Gbit/s.

Sorry for being so cynical... but I hate how America has basterdised the meaning of 4G.
post #20 of 66

As of now what would make me a lot happier would be for Verizon to launch Voice Over LTE. The fact that I can't do simultaneous voice & data 4 years after the launch of iPhone on Verizon has gotten quite a bit long in the tooth. And the fact that GSM AT&T has beat them to the punch even though voice & data is possible on their network, looks bad for VZW. It wasn't a deal breaker when they first got the iPhone, I was just happy to have an iPhone on VZW. But now that has worn off and I'd just like to be able to have internet capabilities when i'm on the phone and i'm not on WIFI.

post #21 of 66
Seriously, who the **** has complaints about LTE speed? It's more than fast enough, leaving most home connections in the dust.
post #22 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPilya View Post

Considering that (real) 4g is a 100/Mbs technology... are they saying that this will now be 200/Mbs... or are they talking about doubling LTE Advanced which has download speeds of up to 1 Gbit/s making it now 2 Gbit/s.

Sorry for being so cynical... but I hate how America has basterdised the meaning of 4G.

 

We live in the real world and not theoretical world. Didn't HSPA+ have a theoretical peek speed of around 168Mbps? How many times did anyone ever come close to getting anywhere near that? I am also pretty sure Asian and European carriers did just as much to distort these speeds so blaming America seems rather naive. 

post #23 of 66

That's nice but the data plans are the real problem at this point. I recently moved so I had no cable for a month and a half, so I relied on my wireless provider for Internet. With casual web surfing without intentionally trying to stream video, I managed to hit 5+ GB on each of my devices (2 x phones = 10+ GB). Based upon some of the speed tests posted online for XLTE, one could blow through a 2 GB data cap in a half hour if they were streaming at full speed. Yay.

 

That is like the government saying you can only drive 20 miles per day and then announce they are upping the speed limit from 65 to 120 MPH on highways.


Edited by Negafox - 5/19/14 at 1:42pm
post #24 of 66

It's not about individual subscriber line access. This backhaul/cell site upgrade is about selling businesses on a 30-50Gb plan to replace their TDM T1 or POTS phone lines, by moving them to an LTE solution. Currently, more businesses are looking at cellular connections as a backup plan, and that backup plan "could" be their primary connection because the throughput is better than their T1 service. 

 

Bigger backhauls = more money and more overage fees to businesses who will most likely not blink at a 15$ per Gb overage fee 

 

Individuals/residential plans just get to ride the network and give carrier's free money for being connected to the same network. 

 

This is why the FCC in their NPRM mentioned that business contracts, enterprise, and wholesale deals would be untouched by new regulation. meaning: Businesses can make deals while consumers are stuck with low data caps.

post #25 of 66
They are still not as fast as AT&T.
post #26 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post
 

 

I know people can post speedtests from the other carriers that are higher speeds but honestly I have never felt the need to go above 8Mbps on my phone. Videos and music streaming which have a far higher demand than web surfing work very well. I can't wait for the iPhone 6 that will support Sprint Spark which the 5 and 5s do not support since they do not support LTE on the 2.5Ghz spectrum. I am anxious not so much for the speed boost as how much greater coverage this will provide. 

 

8Mbps?

 

Pffft!

 

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post #27 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

Lol, yep very good point which is why I am glad I still have an unlimited data plan.
It's not a good point let alone a very good point. Having better data throughput is not a negative (tempted to say 'never a negative' but...) it doesn't really change how quickly you reach your data cap in any meaningful way other than you will not be sitting waiting on your device as long as it spins on some data transfer. Being empowered to choose how much to use your device trumps having a limit imposed by whatever restrictions.
post #28 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by msantti View Post

Must be awesome to access your 2 GB cap even faster now!

 

Amusingly, I often turn OFF the LTE* in my iPhone 5, because ads and other videos pre-load so quickly that they burn up my bandwidth, before I have a chance to turn them off or leave the page.

 

*when using my phone as a WiFi hotspot, which is almost every day.


Edited by TeaEarleGreyHot - 5/19/14 at 2:36pm
post #29 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Seriously, who the **** has complaints about LTE speed? It's more than fast enough, leaving most home connections in the dust.

Not really.  At my work location, near a university dormitory complex, there are so many users on Verizon's network that the LTE on my iPhone 5 is very very slow, and frequently some apps time-out before they can get me logged in to their service/site.  And at my previous home location, there were so many VZW users in the neighborhood that 3G service was often at dial-up speeds. Seriously, my speedometer readings were 0.067 Mbps!  And Verizon 3 yr ago said there was nothing they could do at the time.  It was part of the reason I moved!  So adding some capacity to the bandwidth would be nice.  Especially for those who can use it.

post #30 of 66

You too? 

 

I would like a setting to turn off all video from apps on my iPhone/iPad. 

 

I can keep my Macbook Pro from using video by just refusing to install Flash. 

 

btw.. I'm one of those people using cellular 4G as a primary connection, due to monopoly carriers/cable refusing to build broadband to my location. 

post #31 of 66
Quote:
Customers with legacy LTE devices, such as Apple's iPhone 5, will also benefit from the extra capacity crated by XLTE capable devices moving to the AWS spectrum.

 

Yes, in the same way that there's plenty of room on a sinking ship.  

 

LTE: It's too popular so nobody goes there anymore.

post #32 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post
 

 

8Mbps?

 

Pffft!

 

Hope you enjoy using that fast 4G in the few square miles in Australia where Vodafone offers it. And since I don't run a web server from my iPhone I would love to hear how you put that 42 Mb/s upload speed to any practical use given that Vodafone only offers around 2.5GB of data a month at the high end or am I mistaken. We have more LTE towers in my one state than Vodafone has in all of Australia. I pay $50 for unlimited LTE data and I can actually use it all over the country not just in a few major cities. 

 

post #33 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by blurpbleepbloop View Post


It's not a good point let alone a very good point. Having better data throughput is not a negative (tempted to say 'never a negative' but...) it doesn't really change how quickly you reach your data cap in any meaningful way other than you will not be sitting waiting on your device as long as it spins on some data transfer. Being empowered to choose how much to use your device trumps having a limit imposed by whatever restrictions.

Who exactly are you even arguing with. I never made any of those assertions and nether did the guy I was responding too. Everyone wants fast data and I would assume all would also want unlimited data at a reasonable price. You might want to go back and read the posts again because you clearly were responding to a perceived argument and not one actually uttered by me at least. 

post #34 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by TechManMike View Post

As of now what would make me a lot happier would be for Verizon to launch Voice Over LTE. The fact that I can't do simultaneous voice & data 4 years after the launch of iPhone on Verizon has gotten quite a bit long in the tooth. And the fact that GSM AT&T has beat them to the punch even though voice & data is possible on their network, looks bad for VZW. It wasn't a deal breaker when they first got the iPhone, I was just happy to have an iPhone on VZW. But now that has worn off and I'd just like to be able to have internet capabilities when i'm on the phone and i'm not on WIFI.

It's not VZW's fault. All other smartphones on VZW can do SVD. Apple didn't include the additional antenna that would've given it that feature.
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post #35 of 66

Seems either next-to-nobody here with a 5s or iPad Air is on Verizon or this story is just tripe. Common 'Rizers, show us your speeds!

post #36 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

Yes, in the same way that there's plenty of room on a sinking ship.  

LTE: Nobody goes there anymore. It's too crowded.

I fixed it for you.
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post #37 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


It's not VZW's fault. All other smartphones on VZW can do SVD. Apple didn't include the additional antenna that would've given it that feature.

Not true.The Samsung Galaxy S5 has one CDMA radio for its cellular capabilities. To talk and surf the web at the same time, you will have to be on Wi-Fi as it will use two different chips to transmit voice/data. That was true of the S3 and a few other models a few years back but not any longer since they thought it a waste of money to include two radios now that VoLTE is coming. 

post #38 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

Not true.The Samsung Galaxy S5 has one CDMA radio for its cellular capabilities. To talk and surf the web at the same time, you will have to be on Wi-Fi as it will use two different chips to transmit voice/data. That was true of the S3 and a few other models a few years back but not any longer since they thought it a waste of money to include two radios now that VoLTE is coming. 

That's only limited to the Sprint version for some odd reason.
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post #39 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


That's only limited to the Sprint version for some odd reason.

Not true again. Better check your facts. Only a few phones could and the same ones that could on Verizon also worked with SVDO on Sprint. 

 

http://forums.androidcentral.com/verizon-samsung-galaxy-s4/269176-svdo-verizon.html

 

http://www.usoftphone.com/t187753.html


Edited by gwmac - 5/19/14 at 4:28pm
post #40 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

Not true again. Better check your facts. 

I just witnessed someone do it with my very own eyes using the VZW version.
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