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Apple's Mac Pro ship times fall below one week for first time since launch

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
More than six months after Apple debuted its redesigned Mac Pro, the company has finally caught up with demand and is estimating ship times of three to five days on base configurations sold through the Online Apple Store.



Apple's new shipping estimates hit the Online Apple Store early Saturday, ending a six-month Mac Pro drought that caused customers who purchased the computer in January and February to wait more than one month for their order to arrive. The change was first spotted by Portuguese Apple blog AllMacLong.

At the time of this writing only base model configurations are eligible for 3-5 day ship-by times, while modified systems are still running at 2-3 weeks.

Since launching the completely redesigned Mac Pro in December, Apple has faced supply issues with the "Assembled in USA" machine. The company has been making steady progress, however, and advanced ship times to 2-3 weeks earlier in May. Last month, ship-by dates dropped to below one month for the first time since launch.

Historically, ship-by dates have steadily improved over the first quarter, with checks in April showing estimates at 5-6 weeks, which moved up to 4-6 weeks on Apr. 11, 4-5 weeks on Apr. 18 and 3-5 weeks on Apr. 24.

While the new estimates mark substantial progress, supply is such that in-store models are still non-existent. In January, Apple said it didn't expect to have Mac Pros available to buy from brick-and-mortar stores until at least March.

As Apple builds its inventory toward 24-hour ship times, authorized resellers like MacMall and Adorama have dozens of Mac Pro configurations for sale, which can be seen in AppleInsider's live Price Guides.
post #2 of 51

Apple, fix HDMI1.4->2.0 4k/60Hz and add miniDisplay Port SST 4k/60Hz support.

 

It is the least you can do after "support 3 4k monitors" bragging which turns out to be a farce. 

post #3 of 51
I'm happy that US assembled serious tech is selling well. So it's not all about those small, light gadgets.
post #4 of 51
I would love to know whether this is a case of demand being higher than expected or if it's a case of supply being lower than expected demand.

Either way, it has been a very long time since apple has had such a hard time getting supply caught up with demand. The last time I remember it being this bad was when the "low cost" Mac IIsi and LC came out, can anyone remember something more recent?
post #5 of 51

Hawaii GPUs and dual internal SSDs would be nice (even if 1 of the Thunderbolt controllers has to be sacrificed).

post #6 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

it has been a very long time since apple has had such a hard time getting supply caught up with demand.

It's been a long time since a major Apple hardware product wasn't assembled in China. CTO builds are still 2-3 weeks. I hope this has just been growing pains, not a sign of the best we can do in the U.S.

post #7 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by hydr View Post

Apple, fix HDMI1.4->2.0 4k/60Hz and add miniDisplay Port SST 4k/60Hz support.

It is the least you can do after "support 3 4k monitors" bragging which turns out to be a farce.

10.9.3 seems to have fixed some issues:

http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/peripherals/f/3529/t/19542094.aspx?pi23185=2

"This (4K Dell UP3214Q display) now works on my MacPro (late 2013) using the seeded beta of Mavericks 10.9.3 at 60hz x 3840x2160 on D700's, with DP 1.2 compliant cable and the monitor set in 1.2.

So happy to see the back of 30hz as it was doing my head in."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor 
I would love to know whether this is a case of demand being higher than expected or if it's a case of supply being lower than expected demand.

Their revenue was almost unchanged since the same quarter last year when the last Mac Pro was not only long overdue an update but not for sale in Europe. If they sold 100,000 units at a minimum $3k, that would make up $300m revenue. This is possible but for this to happen, the Mac revenue would have had to decline by about $200m without the Mac Pro update. The number of units may not have exceeded 100k and this is out of around 4-5m Macs they sell every quarter.

As compelling as the design is, just a quad-core starts at $3,000 now and that cuts out a lot of potential buyers when there's a display and peripherals to go along with it.

It doesn't need to be a high volume operation though. I think they scaled the manufacturing way down. This would mean that when the sales die down, they aren't over staffed and it would still be high profit.

They might have room to drop the price once the sales die down a bit and that would keep the sales volume.
post #8 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I would love to know whether this is a case of demand being higher than expected or if it's a case of supply being lower than expected demand.

I don't think it's either.

 

I ordered mine in early April. At the time the ship time was "6 to 8 weeks". So it would arrive last week of May.

 

By the mid/end April, the times had been reduced to "4 to 6 weeks". So it would arrive the last week of May.

 

By early May it was "3 to 4 weeks". So it would arrive the last week of May.

 

Then it was "2 to 3 weeks". So it would arrive the last week of May.

 

Now it is the last week of May, and the delivery time is one week. So it would arrive the last week of May.

 

Does that sound like a supply or demand problem to you? Or something to do with the way the factory is being worked?

post #9 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I would love to know whether this is a case of demand being higher than expected or if it's a case of supply being lower than expected demand.

 

Why does it matter? It seems to me the only reason it matters is to confirm or refute one’s personal bias for or against the new Mac Pro. Those who criticize the new design and ports would feel vindicated if demand is lower then expected while those who like the new machine would sense confirmation of their opinion if demand is outstripping supply. So it is just about whether you are a glass half-empty or a glass half-full person regarding the new Mac Pro. 

post #10 of 51
I'm curious to know which potential buyers are cut out because of the price. Is the nMP more expensive than the previous model?
post #11 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I'm curious to know which potential buyers are cut out because of the price. Is the nMP more expensive than the previous model?
I am not aware of any. I never purchased a prior version of the Mac Pro, but I have considered buying one several times. When pricing them, I always felt that they were incredibly expensive. I did did not find them to be unnecessarily expensive, but I did find them to be very much the high-price spread. I see nothing in the prices of the new Mac Pros that place them outside the price spectrum of the older model. Heck, even used Mac Pros are not cheap. As of this writing, PowerMax offers a used MacPro5.1 for $2700. It does not take a rocket scientist to understand that this computer's price when new was somewhere north of $2700.
post #12 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I would love to know whether this is a case of demand being higher than expected or if it's a case of supply being lower than expected demand.

Supply is lower than demand. 

 

The Mac Pro still isn't available as an off-the-shelf purchase from bricks-and-mortar retailers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I'm curious to know which potential buyers are cut out because of the price. Is the nMP more expensive than the previous model?

 

The entry-level new Mac Pro is $2999, the old one was $2499.

 

At this price category, I doubt if many potential buyers are shut out. This is a professional tool. Either your employer is purchasing it for you to do your job, or a self-employed owner will write it off as a business expense for tax purposes.

 

In the long run, the cost of a desktop CPU is just fraction of your total computing system (display, software, peripherals, services, networking, etc.).


Edited by mpantone - 5/24/14 at 9:03am
post #13 of 51

I know the new MP is fast and all, but I so much preferred the original design. I love my current MP with matching Cinema and keyboard. I guess they made it black to match the Sharp monitor which might be a better color for a dark video editing bay. Overall I still think it is ugly, but that is just me. If they designed it for video professionals wouldn't it have made more sense as a rectangular box shape like all the rest of the equipment they use? I like the front facing FW and USB ports of my current MP. Much more convenient for importing media.

 

I always like to have the best, newest Mac but I just can't talk myself in to it for some reason. I'm glad that the 60 Hz thing is almost fixed. Perhaps I'll spring for it when the next series of 4K monitors arrives. Everything is a bit too bleeding edge right now. I must be getting more conservative as I get older.

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post #14 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

Now it is the last week of May, and the delivery time is one week. So it would arrive the last week of May.

 

Does that sound like a supply or demand problem to you? Or something to do with the way the factory is being worked?

You might be right. Do we know how much of the manufacturing is done in the US assembly plant? Perhaps they build them in batches.

 

ttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbWOQWw1wkM


Edited by mstone - 5/24/14 at 11:28am

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post #15 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I would love to know whether this is a case of demand being higher than expected or if it's a case of supply being lower than expected demand.

When Intel announced the chipset for TB2 in 2013 they said it would have limited availability until sometime this year. I don't know why every story about the new Mac Pro availability issues seems to ignore this fact. In any event, I don't think there can be any question that supply of the TB2 chips is part of the problem for the constrained supply. GPU supply issues are probably also contributing.

 

I have no doubt initial demand for the new Mac Pro was probably pretty good, but the bulk of the delays are being caused by component shortages not super high demand.

 

-kpluck

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post #16 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I guess they made it black to match the Sharp monitor which might be a better color for a dark video editing bay.

Not quite black, it's reflective of whatever environment its in:





and it matches the Thunderbolt display more closely than the old one:


Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Overall I still think it is ugly, but that is just me.

Design is always going to be subjective but new designs tend to be more modern and fresh. If someone who'd never seen the machines before was asked to pick out the latest model, it would be obvious.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

If they designed it for video professionals wouldn't it have made more sense as a rectangular box shape like all the rest of the equipment they use?

It wouldn't make much of a functional difference if the heat still escaped vertically. There's also not much indication it's specifically designed for video use.
post #17 of 51

In the late 1980s I spent $1200 or $1500 for a used Mac Plus. A few years later, over $2000 for a Mac desktop without a hard drive, and in 1999 a PowerMac G3 for $1900 with a 6 GB hard drive ! Gradually I spent less and less for new Macs, including Mac Minis for less than $1000; but if $2000 or more for a Mac was not too much, 15 or 20 or 25 years ago, then how can it be too much now? 

post #18 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post
 
It wouldn't make much of a functional difference if the heat still escaped vertically. 

Just because heat naturally rises is not much of a factor when air is being pushed through the enclosure. Exhausting from the top or the back is equally effective in my opinion. In fact the rear exhaust is probably better in my case because I tend to have a lot of reference manuals and print outs on my desk and I would have to be careful not to block the air inlet on the new design. The argument that modern computing doesn't need optical drives or internal hard drives is also a matter of opinion.

 

I'm curious to see how heavy duty the power supply turns out to be. In my experience small 1U power supplies don't have a very good MTBF compared to the large heavy duty PSU like in the old MP. But I guess it doesn't have be very high power since it is not spinning any drives. The new design is a lot smaller but you really don't save all that much footprint because you are going to need a RAID enclosure. I usually have a FW drive sitting  on top of mine, which I use for off site back ups for the client or for importing media. With the new design you can't put anything on top, so that is something else on the desk.

 

I know what you are saying about someone unfamiliar being able to choose the newer model but how about someone who has been using a Mac Pro for years. Let's say Apple had a focus group of top pros and asked which machine they would prefer. The original style case with updated TB2, dual Xeons, dual GPU, USB3, Superdrive and an SSD, or the new MP cylinder design. I know which one I would choose even if it cost a lot more.

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post #19 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post













 

 

OMG!!!

 

THAT THING IS BEAUTIFUL!!!

post #20 of 51
Waiting to buy till i see the new Apple display.

By the time they come out with a retina-ish desktop display for it (at not an insane price like the Sharp 4K display), I'll want to wait for new Mac Pro revision 2.
post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Just because heat naturally rises is not much of a factor when air is being pushed through the enclosure. Exhausting from the top or the back is equally effective in my opinion.

Right but if they did vent it vertically then a rectangular design wouldn't be much benefit. It would be necessary if they vented it horizontally.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

The argument that modern computing doesn't need optical drives or internal hard drives is also a matter of opinion.

It's a matter of seeing where technology is going. Mechanical drives simply can't keep up with solid state in performance. There was even a news article out recently saying a simple software change could make SSDs last twice as long and run 3x faster:

http://www.neowin.net/news/ssd-breakthrough-means-300-speed-boost-60-less-power-usage-even-on-old-drives

This might allow Apple to use TLC NAND and double storage for a reasonable price while pushing SSDs up to 3GB/s. Samsung already has SSDs running at 3GB/s. PCIe SSDs are coming into DDR1 memory bandwidth. Having a 2TB 3GB/s SSD would be like having 2TB of slow RAM.

An internal HDD will always slow down the whole system at some point, heat it up more and make more noise than necessary. SSDs will become inexpensive and replace HDDs entirely so there's not much point in designing a chassis to accommodate something that will be removed later on.

Optical drives are finished, even Sony said so:

http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/storage/display/20080902135402_Sony_Admits_Blu_Ray_Is_the_Last_Optical_Disc_Format.html

"“Blu-Ray is the final format for the optical disc. We don’t have a shorter laser. In the future, if we have a physical media format, it will change physically. It won’t look like an optical disc. I don’t know what sort of technology we will have in the future,” he said, “but while using lasers and optical discs, this is the final format,” said Taka Miyama, Sony’s product strategy manager"

Their Archival Disc coming in 2015 uses 6 layers to get to 300GB. I can just imagine how long that'll take to write and is everyone going to be upgrading their internal laptop Blu-Ray drives again? Gigabit networking is the way forward and inexpensive SSDs will replace discs for archival use. When NAND gets to $0.10/GB, 10TB = $1000 and that's all anyone will need.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I'm curious to see how heavy duty the power supply turns out to be. In my experience small 1U power supplies don't have a very good MTBF compared to the large heavy duty PSU like in the old MP. But I guess it doesn't have be very high power since it is not spinning any drives.

The drives hardly use any power (10-20W tops) vs the GPUs (~200W each) and CPU (~100W). The new Mac Pro maxes out around 450W, the old one would likely draw around the same under typical circumstances. There's no reason to think this PSU is any lower quality than before. It's sandwiched between the IO board and motherboard and gets cooled with the same fan as the rest of the machine. The previous model had PSU failures:

http://www.mac-forums.com/forums/apple-desktops/267864-psu-failure-mac-pro.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

The new design is a lot smaller but you really don't save all that much footprint because you are going to need a RAID enclosure.

That's still much smaller than the old model and not everyone will need a RAID drive and some who do won't need it locally.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I know what you are saying about someone unfamiliar being able to choose the newer model but how about someone who has been using a Mac Pro for years. Let's say Apple had a focus group of top pros and asked which machine they would prefer. The original style case with updated TB2, dual Xeons, dual GPU, USB3, Superdrive and an SSD, or the new MP cylinder design. I know which one I would choose even if it cost a lot more.

All you added there was an extra CPU and an optical drive. That doesn't need to revert to the old case. A 2nd CPU would fit in the new one but what's the point when they offer a single 12-core anyway? Sure they might offer dual 8-cores, which would be a bit faster but not enough to warrant stocking a whole new dual-socket motherboard just for the few people who want it. They simply wouldn't offer dual 12-cores because it would be at a price hardly anyone would pay.

An optical drive could have been placed right at the bottom or stuck on the side of the cylinder but not everyone uses them so why compromise the design for the minority who do? USB optical drives are inexpensive.
post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I would love to know whether this is a case of demand being higher than expected or if it's a case of supply being lower than expected demand.

Either way, it has been a very long time since apple has had such a hard time getting supply caught up with demand. The last time I remember it being this bad was when the "low cost" Mac IIsi and LC came out, can anyone remember something more recent?

obviously its a case of not being able to make them as fast as people want them.  :-)

 

No one really knows how many are being made outside of Intel and Apple, but typically it takes Intel a few months to get their production levels up to speed with new high end processors.  Intel's done this before because the yields of these higher end processors just aren't that great in the beginning.  To make one is easy, to make them by the hundreds of thousands isn't.

post #23 of 51

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post #24 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post




It wouldn't make much of a functional difference if the heat still escaped vertically. There's also not much indication it's specifically designed for video use.

Gorgeous! both of them

 

 

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post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBaustian View Post
 

In the late 1980s I spent $1200 or $1500 for a used Mac Plus. A few years later, over $2000 for a Mac desktop without a hard drive, and in 1999 a PowerMac G3 for $1900 with a 6 GB hard drive ! Gradually I spent less and less for new Macs, including Mac Minis for less than $1000; but if $2000 or more for a Mac was not too much, 15 or 20 or 25 years ago, then how can it be too much now? 

Inflation.

 

One buck in 1998 is worth two now (more or less).

 

Two grand buys more computing power today due to Moore's Law and other advances in computing technology. Heck, my iPhone has more CPU speed, graphics capability, storage, and RAM than my desktop PC from the late Nineties.

post #26 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

The argument that modern computing doesn't need optical drives or internal hard drives is also a matter of opinion.

It's not a matter of opinion. The market decides, not an individual.

 

In the consumer computing marketplace, the answer is pretty clear. Optical drives and internal rotational hard drives are has-beens.

 

Apple's most popular consumer computer product line (MacBook) has neither. 

 

Anecdotally, the last computer I bought with a built-in optical drive was in 2006, the last computer I bought with an internal rotational hard drive was in 2010. I do not consider myself to be an early adopter (my first iPhone was the 4S).

post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

Inflation.

 

One buck in 1998 is worth two now (more or less).

 

Two grand buys more computing power today due to Moore's Law and other advances in computing technology. Heck, my iPhone has more CPU speed, graphics capability, storage, and RAM than my desktop PC from the late Nineties.

Then you have to factor in Moore's Law with regards to technology.

 

I think the modern OSs for MOST people are reaching a point where MOST people can easily do what they need to do with 4GB to 8GB of RAM.  The only reason why I have 16GB on my computer is that I'm running high end music players that plays 24 bit content and it stores the music in RAM as a buffer and I sometimes load about 9GB of RAM.  It I didn't use that app, I wouldn't need much more than 4GB of RAM for MOST of the other work I do on my daily user.  I rarely see the processors using much more than 20% processing power and I'm using an i5 3.2GHz from 2012.  Most of the time the processor cores are doing hardly anything.  I'm thinking of buying a new MacMini after they refresh the product to dedicate it to just playing music and dumping all of my content over and then my 2 year old iMac is PLENTY for what i use it for.  Then I shouldn't have to replace either model until they physically disintegrate to where I can't run the latest OS, but I don't see that happening for a LONG time.  

post #28 of 51

You do not need to factor in Moore's Law.

 

Consumers don't.

 

Heck, even pros don't. Buy what works for you today.

 

Regardless whether you're a consumer or pro, it's an expense, not an investment.

 

If you want an investment, buy some AAPL, not a Mac Pro. A computer is an appliance, like a toaster oven or a cordless screwdriver. Only dorkwads care about what they paid for that computer or toaster oven they bought in 1994.


Edited by mpantone - 5/24/14 at 6:24pm
post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

You do not need to factor in Moore's Law.

Consumers don't.

Heck, even pros don't. Buy what works for you today.

Regardless whether you're a consumer or pro, it's an expense, not an investment.

If you want an investment, buy some AAPL, not a Mac Pro. A computer is an appliance, like a toaster oven or a cordless screwdriver. Only dork wads care about what they paid for that computer or toaster oven they bought in 1994.

"Dork wads" I like that.

You're right. Computers are an expense, NOT an investment.

I'm glad to see this new Mac Pro, which shows me that Apple is serious about a pro machine--serious enough to make this magnitude of investment in INNOVATING a totally new machine as well as build a whole new plant in the US to manufacture it.

Its true beauty lies in its simplicity, its modularity which allows for far more flexible system configuration than any old box tower could have, all while providing the most elegantly efficient and quiet cooling system for its internal components.

If these dork wads could stop whining for a while and take a look at it, they might just realize that this Pro will provide for much easier maintenance. A backup Pro could be ready to swap out with a failing one, and its system restored quickly from a Time Machine backup on an external drive. Any failing Thunderbolt-connected component could be similarly swapped out. And virtually ALL of the components could be located in a separate environmentally-controlled room to enable operators to work in a totally quiet environment.

This Pro also answers all the requests over the years for a "mini tower", available in configurations to suit a broad range of mid-range customers.

And why whine over no processor upgrades (though it is indeed possible)? With this modular Pro, it might very well make sense to simply upgrade the whole machine. There may very well be a market for used new Pros, after all.
Edited by DanielSW - 5/24/14 at 6:50pm

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post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

You do not need to factor in Moore's Law.

 

Consumers don't.

 

Heck, even pros don't. Buy what works for you today.

 

Regardless whether you're a consumer or pro, it's an expense, not an investment.

 

If you want an investment, buy some AAPL, not a Mac Pro. A computer is an appliance, like a toaster oven or a cordless screwdriver. Only dorkwads care about what they paid for that computer or toaster oven they bought in 1994.

 

Um, Moore's Law is at work just like inflation. Consumers don't factor anything other than what they can afford and what they need and hopefully they buy within their budget and it does what they need. Moore's law is in effect until Moore's Law ceases to hold up, but it's always at work with technology.  Every year, things get better as that price/peformance ratio is changing.  A brand new $3000 computer set up today is better than what was available 2 years ago for $3000.

 

I don't even care what my last computer was, I only care what my existing one is and what i want or need for my next one when the current computer can't do what I need it to do.

post #31 of 51

Again, this is not a concern for consumer buyers.

 

Whether or not Moore's Law holds up is irrelevant for consumers. Even you admit that you don't care what your last computer was.

 

You just care that the computer that you buy today for $3000 is better than the computer you bought a few years about for $3000. Well, that's going to happen whether it be inflation or Moore's Law.

 

I repeat: Joe Consumer doesn't give a sh!t.

post #32 of 51
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

You just care that the computer that you buy today for $3000 is better than the computer you bought a few years about for $3000.

 

So Moore’s law is implicitly a concern for consumers. You’re contradicting yourself.

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post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

So Moore’s law is implicitly a concern for consumers. You’re contradicting yourself.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

Again, this is not a concern for consumer buyers.

 

Whether or not Moore's Law holds up is irrelevant for consumers. Even you admit that you don't care what your last computer was.

 

You just care that the computer that you buy today for $3000 is better than the computer you bought a few years about for $3000. Well, that's going to happen whether it be inflation or Moore's Law.

 

I repeat: Joe Consumer doesn't give a sh!t.

Actually Joe Consumer inherently knows that Moore's Law exists, they may not know it by that term, but if you talk to someone, they already know that what will be coming out next year and the year after next for the same amount of money will be faster, bigger this, more of that, etc. etc.

 

I talked to someone that has basically no computer background whatsoever, he had just bought an iPhone 5 about 6 months after it was announced, he read about the iPhone 5S and he automatically wanted that one, and now he wants the iPhone 6 and he knows that each year, there will be better models with better this and that.  It's always in the back of one's mind because we've been trained to expect constant speed increases, etc. etc. for the same price (approx price point). 

 

I see a lot of people that don't have much computer knowledge, yet they'll think in terms of what the next rev model is going to be.  Some don't care, some do. If you are in the IT industry, you have to know this and factor it into a purchasing decision.

 

The case in point, if no one cared, then there wouldn't be such a mad rush within the first 3 months of a new product release, then it levels off and then drastically drops in demand because they are waiting for the NEXT release.

 

How many people upgrade their smartphone once a year vs every 2 years vs every 3 years?

 

If one doesn't use a computer at all, then they don't care.  But I'm sure you can plot everyone's level of concern on a bell curve, it's just asking enough people in a survey and then plotting the responses. 

post #34 of 51

@marvin

Ok fine, I'll buy one but only because there is no other alternative. I don't like the design. To me it is like a Mac mini pro with a crappy inconvenient modernistic Jony Ive futuristic, ultra-utilitarian, minimalistic design when I want industrial strength bullet proof heavy duty equipment. I would much prefer a nice big box with lots of slots for cards, ram, hard drives and fans. Another thing is, I think the new MP is really ugly. Perhaps I can build a desk with a custom cabinet to hide it inside a compartment so I don't have to look at it.

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post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

To me it is like a Mac mini pro with a crappy inconvenient modernistic Jony Ive futuristic, ultra-utilitarian, minimalistic design when I want industrial strength bullet proof heavy duty equipment. I would much prefer a nice big box with lots of slots for cards, ram, hard drives and fans.

That's just a perception that people have built up over the years. This is the first time that the highest-end machines have been offered exclusively in a small form factor in 30 years.

When people say heavy duty, it's based on the notion that power comes from size but it doesn't directly come from size. The new Mac Pro's SSDs run around 1GB/s, which is far more capable of handling heavy duty tasks than the drives that go in the old Mac Pro.

The new cooling system is better too under heavy load:



The slots for cards is mainly an issue for the GPUs but that just allows people to extend the life of their machine with 3rd party GPUs and that doesn't benefit Apple. RAM is not an issue when the new one supports 128GB just like the old one. Internal HDDs would have been useful but what people would likely have done is opt for 256GB SSDs with 4TB HDD and that doesn't help bring down the SSD costs. Lots of fans are unnecessary as the above video shows. Apple's single fan does a great job cooling the machine so more fans would just make more noise.
post #36 of 51

The Mac Pro is a sublime piece of kit, showing Apple is miles ahead of the non-existent competitors in this space. 

post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I guess they made it black to match the Sharp monitor which might be a better color for a dark video editing bay. Overall I still think it is ugly, but that is just me. If they designed it for video professionals wouldn't it have made more sense as a rectangular box shape like all the rest of the equipment they use? I like the front facing FW and USB ports of my current MP. Much more convenient for importing media.

You obviously haven't seen a new Mac Pro in person. They're not black but rather a highly reflective silver. Like all if Apple's hardware products, this product will change your perspective upon seeing it in person compared to pictures and specs. In that sense it's really similar to iPhone and iPad when it comes to making first impressions on customers.
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by enzos View Post

The Mac Pro is a sublime piece of kit, showing Apple is miles ahead of the non-existent competitors in this space. 
It is an amazing piece of engineering. But I'm sure back in the day people thought the iMac was ugly too as it was so different than what was on the market at the time.
post #39 of 51
Quote:

Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

 

The entry-level new Mac Pro is $2999, the old one was $2499.

 

At this price category, I doubt if many potential buyers are shut out. This is a professional tool. Either your employer is purchasing it for you to do your job, or a self-employed owner will write it off as a business expense for tax purposes.

 

In the long run, the cost of a desktop CPU is just fraction of your total computing system (display, software, peripherals, services, networking, etc.).

I worked for a post production company and we bought the old Mac Pros for between $5k and $8k typically.  The price of the new Mac Pro is not unreasonable, particularly considering the increases in computing and GPU power.  If I were buying one for that facility today it would be more expensive overall because we would have to buy new monitors (we don't have Thunderbolt or Mini Displayport monitors), new RAIDs, and new video input devices such as the AJA iO 4k.  For storage we could use a Thunderbolt to Fibre Channel converter to utilize existing RAIDs, but why not get something newer and faster that uses TB?

post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

So Moore’s law is implicitly a concern for consumers. You’re contradicting yourself.

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

I worked for a post production company and we bought the old Mac Pros for between $5k and $8k typically.  The price of the new Mac Pro is not unreasonable, particularly considering the increases in computing and GPU power.  If I were buying one for that facility today it would be more expensive overall because we would have to buy new monitors (we don't have Thunderbolt or Mini Displayport monitors), new RAIDs, and new video input devices such as the AJA iO 4k.  For storage we could use a Thunderbolt to Fibre Channel converter to utilize existing RAIDs, but why not get something newer and faster that uses TB?

For industry professionals, the price is not the primary consideration. I've sold high end systems to corp customers that had their own in- house production and their attitude is "What's the most expensive model, fully loaded, etc. Etc. And I'll take two or three or more just so we have enough to use as backup." It's almost the opposite of what wanting the least expensive computer, they want the best and most expensive. I used to sell to software developers that were developing CAD s/w. Same thing. What's the most exoensive model fully loaded? I'll take 10 and we'll back to buy some more. It was funny.
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