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Inside the 'iWatch': The technology Apple is looking at for your wrist

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
Apple's anticipated entry to the wearable devices market has taken on near-mythical status, with rumors reaching every corner of the technology map. AppleInsider has rounded up some of the technologies most likely to find their way into the still-unannounced "iWatch."

iWatch concept


Materials



Sapphire

ASF
GT Advanced Technologies' ASF sapphire furnace.
Source: GT Advanced


Apple's interest: A $578 million deal with sapphire equipment maker GT Advanced Technologies to open and operate a massive commercial sapphire plant in Arizona.

Much has been made of Apple's agreement GT Advanced Technologies. Many believe the new jointly-operated facility in Arizona will produce display covers to replace the Gorilla Glass currently used in the iPhone and iPad; some think the crystals will be used in an iWatch, while still others believe that Apple simply needs more sapphire for its camera lenses and Touch ID housings.

If sapphire is to be used as a main component of an Apple device, the iWatch is its most likely target. High-end watch companies have long used sapphire to cover the faces of their timepieces because of its scratch resistance, but -- as anyone who has dropped a sapphire-covered watch can attest -- the material is prone to shattering, making it far better suited for a device that's constantly strapped to a person rather than hanging loosely in their hands.

Liquidmetal

A number of cast Liquidmetal casings for mobile phones | Source: Liquidmetal
A number of cast Liquidmetal casings for mobile phones | Source: Liquidmetal


Apple's interest: A $20 million contract for exclusive rights to use Liquidmetal in consumer electronics and a number of manufacturing patents related to the material. That agreement was re-upped through February 2015 earlier this week.

Liquidmetal is an amorphous alloy -- essentially, metallic glass -- that is much lighter, harder, and more flexible than metals traditionally used in electronics manufacturing. Parts made of Liquidmetal could "snap back" from deformations that might cause permanent bends or dents in other metals, such as Apple's omnipresent aluminum, and it's extremely scratch-resistant.

Liquidmetal is difficult to work with, however. Apple famously tested its viability by using it to make the SIM ejector tool included with the iPhone 3GS, but Liquidmetal's inventor predicted in 2012 that at least two to four years of further refinement in manufacturing processes was necessary before it could be commercially viable on a large scale.

Complicating Liquidmetal's possible appearance in Apple's iWatch is a deal with Switzerland's Swatch group that granted the horologists exclusive use of Liquidmetal in watches.

Displays



OLED

Samsung flexible display
Samsung Mobile Display showing off a flexible display at CES 2011. Source: OLED-Display.net


Apple's interest: Apple has a number of OLED-related patents to its name, including dynamic brightness adjustment and improved power efficiency. The company also hired away a senior OLED researcher from LG Display.

OLED -- or organic light-emitting diode -- displays are a new type of display in which each pixel is made of an organic compound that emits light when electrical current is passed through it. Because of this design, OLED panels don't require a backlight, making them thinner and lighter than traditional LCD-based panels and adding the potential to be folded or curved.

While many Apple watchers previously expected the iWatch to ship with a more traditional LCD panel, the tide of opinion has shifted in recent months in favor of OLED. The inclusion of a flexible OLED would allow for a more form-fitting design in which the screen could curve with the contours of the wearer's wrist, rather than sitting flat on the top.

From the outside, Apple has long seemed apathetic toward OLEDs. Former CEO Steve Jobs is thought to have disliked the technology, and current chief Tim Cook panned OLED earlier this year, saying that the displays showed "awful" color saturation.

"If you ever buy anything online and really want to know what he color is, as many people do, you should really think twice before you depend on the color from an OLED display," he said.

Micro-LED


A similar micro LED array displayed by Taiwanese researchers

Apple's interest: Acquired micro-LED display maker LuxVue Technologies earlier this month for an unknown price.

Micro LEDs are essentially exactly what they sound like: very small LEDs. The technology that enables their miniaturization also plays a part in lowering power consumption and increasing brightness, with the combination placing micro LED arrays in direct competition with OLEDs.

This is a relatively new technology, however; Apple's acquisition of secretive LuxVue is likely to have given micro LEDs more exposure the day it was uncovered than the technology has received since its invention. Despite a number of high-profile backers -- and their rumored inclusion in Google's next-generation Glass headset -- micro LEDs have yet to find their way into shipping consumer device.

Still, there is reason to believe that Apple may have chosen the micro LED route. At least one of LuxVue's patents covers the manufacturing of a curved micro LED array, which could replace the flexible AMOLED display Apple is thought to have targeted.

Semiconductors



A4 processor


Apple has made a massive investment in semiconductor technology in recent years, and the iWatch is likely to put those advancements front-and-center. While the iPhone is a technologically impressive piece of kit, the iWatch would have to be a miniaturization tour de force in order to live up to the rumors surrounding its capabilities.

Apple began its semiconductor roadshow in 2008 with the purchase of P.A. Semi, a power-efficient fabless semiconductor design firm working on PowerPC-based chips. Later, in 2010, they purchased Intrinsity, an ARM-focused studio that is thought to have contributed to the development of the A-series processors.
Apple has spent nearly $1 billion on semiconductor technology firms -- that we know of.
Last August, Apple acquired Passif Semiconductor, a company that develops ultra-low-power communications chips. The company has also been seen snapping up senior RF engineers from Broadcom, sparking rumors of a new in-house baseband team.

Finally, last November, Apple picked up Israeli firm PrimeSense for a rumored $360 million, pushing their total investment in semiconductor technology up toward $1 billion. Taken together, the sheer volum of chip design talent and intellectual property now in-house in Cupertino is staggering -- any iWatch introduction is likely to bring along with it a similarly-impressive display of silicon engineering.

That probably won't include noninvasive blood glucose monitoring or three-dimensional mapping, though. Apple is more likely to put its considerable resources to bear on more mundane, but still difficult tasks -- like integrating an application processor, baseband, and wireless communications controller in a single, smaller, less power-hungry chip.
post #2 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


ASF
GT Advanced Technologies' ASF sapphire furnace.
Source: GT Advanced


Oh Look!! It has a Mac 128K built in...!!!
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #3 of 38

I see no mention of the med-tech that Apple has been sourcing.

na na na na na...
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na na na na na...
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post #4 of 38
Quote:
  ...some think the crystals will be used in an iWatch...

 

 

FOOLS! 

 

These crystals are the key component in a new technology designed to communicate with alien civilisations who are already taking over the planet. Look at the new 'flying saucer' Apple campus. We are all doomed.

post #5 of 38
Finally an article about rumoured iWatch that doesn't include we heard from a guy whose brother works somewhere near China who confirmed Apple has chosen this over that for the upcoming iWatch!

Nicely done, a brilliant article.
post #6 of 38

"as anyone who has dropped a sapphire-covered watch can attest -- the material is prone to shattering"

 

This statement surprises me. Surely there are instances of people breaking their watch crystal sometime. But EVERYBODY drops their watch. It just happens. And I can't think of any instance I've experienced, or that I know of, where someone has dropped their watch, and kind-of automatically said "Darn, there goes my watch crystal. They are extremely durable. "Prone to shattering"? Nah. That's way overstating.

As has been noted, as hard as sapphire  is, it still can be scratched. And I would wager that this, still by far, makes up for the majority of sapphire watch crystal replacements over actual breakage. (?)

post #7 of 38

What about the software? No mention about it in the article.

 

Or is it that everyone assumes that it will run some form of iOS?

 

Even if the final product does run some iOS based OS, I wouldn't be surprised that Apple also currently has an iWatch prototype running the Pixo OS (iPod OS) as a plan B.

 

If you look at the latest iPod nano OS, you'll see that the Pixo team went to great lengths into reproducing iOS behaviours (looks like iOS 6 though, but that's a detail). With no new update to the iPod lineup and dwindling iPod sales, you have to wonder what the Pixo team is doing right now with an OS that evolved a lot since the original iPod in 2001.

 

Does an iWatch really need to support CPU intensive apps? If needed, can't the paired iPhone or the cloud serve to handle complex calculations? With a small screen like that, I don't think anyone is expecting to run GarageBand or Numbers.

 

And what if using a similar process to CarPlay, the iPhone could project third party app interfaces into the iWatch touch screen? CarPlay runs on small embedded OSes like QNX, something the Pixo OS could handle without problems. 

post #8 of 38
The cover should be made out of depleted uranium, at least then there would be some use for America's end-of-life stockpiles of nukes...
post #9 of 38
Okay, am I the only one who is AMAZED by the last prototype in that video?! Transparent screens as eye-glass lenses?! Forget your distaste for google Glass for one minute to consider the possibilities of that technology! We're talking Iron Man tech here! Can you imagine wearing a pair of discreet prescription glasses that lets you access your digital content without anyone knowing. Pair it with your phone, incorporate eye-tracking, as well as a camera, and you'll never need to look down at your phone or watch again! So long as the UI was "safe" and not too distracting, I think this could be the future. Exciting to think about anyway...
Edited by winchester - 5/25/14 at 5:38pm
post #10 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by VL-Tone View Post

What about the software? No mention about it in the article.

Or is it that everyone assumes that it will run some form of iOS?

Even if the final product does run some iOS based OS, I wouldn't be surprised that Apple also currently has an iWatch prototype running the Pixo OS (iPod OS) as a plan B.

If you look at the latest iPod nano OS, you'll see that the Pixo team went to great lengths into reproducing iOS behaviours (looks like iOS 6 though, but that's a detail). With no new update to the iPod lineup and dwindling iPod sales, you have to wonder what the Pixo team is doing right now with an OS that evolved a lot since the original iPod in 2001.

Does an iWatch really need to support CPU intensive apps? If needed, can't the paired iPhone or the cloud serve to handle complex calculations? With a small screen like that, I don't think anyone is expecting to run GarageBand or Numbers.

And what if using a similar process to CarPlay, the iPhone could project third party app interfaces into the iWatch touch screen? CarPlay runs on small embedded OSes like QNX, something the Pixo OS could handle without problems. 
I agree. Believe it or not, that's exactly what I was thinking. Very nice comment! Keep it up!
post #11 of 38

If Apple is planning on releasing an iWatch, I would imagine it will need to be very dependent on Siri. Unfortunately, Siri is almost unusable for general purposes. Just today, while I was driving I asked, "Who won the Indianapolis 500?" Sire responded with, "This is what I found". Of course I can't read the screen while driving, so I said please read it to me. The gibberish that followed was so incoherent I can't even remember what she said. Eventually when I was no longer driving I was able to see she had offered up a wikipedia page on the definition of Indy 500. Useless. After giving Siri first crack I then turned to Google and unsurprisingly got a full run down of the exciting conclusion of the final laps, all in clear voice, although she did have a bit of trouble with the name of the Brasilian native Hello Castroneves' pronunciation. 

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post #12 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

If Apple is planning on releasing an iWatch, I would imagine it will need to be very dependent on Siri. Unfortunately, Siri is almost unusable for general purposes. Just today, while I was driving I asked, "Who won the Indianapolis 500?" Sire responded with, "This is what I found". Of course I can't read the screen while driving, so I said please read it to me. The gibberish that followed was so incoherent I can't even remember what she said. Eventually when I was no longer driving I was able to see she had offered up a wikipedia page on the definition of Indy 500. Useless. After giving Siri first crack I then turned to Google and unsurprisingly got a full run down of the exciting conclusion of the final laps, all in clear voice, although she did have a bit of trouble with the name of the Brasilian native Hello Castroneves' pronunciation. 

That seems to imply it would have its own cellular and WiFi capabilities. I would be surprised if either of those are included. I would think that BLE and being heavily dependent on another iDevice would be how this would operate. Not unlike how many firness bands operate insofar as they have basic stand-alone UI options but most of their utility is shown when connected to an iPhone all the data is synced and then displayed on screen. I would shocked to see Apple follow in the footsteps of the "smartwatches" we've seen crop up since over the last couple years.

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post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

That seems to imply it would have its own cellular and WiFi capabilities. I would be surprised if either of those are included. I would think that BLE and being heavily dependent on another iDevice would be how this would operate. Not unlike how many firness bands operate insofar as they have basic stand-alone UI options but most of their utility is shown when connected to an iPhone all the data is synced and then displayed on screen. I would shocked to see Apple follow in the footsteps of the "smartwatches" we've seen crop up since over the last couple years.

Not necessarily have its own cellular, just that if it is going to be useful to people who do not want to take their phone out of their pocket to view general information, she should be able to communicate the exact information requested, when it is so clearly specific and also with time context, not just a Wikipedia page, particularly while driving. 

 

Siri. where is the nearest high ground to escape a flood?  I found this " Wikipedia definition of flood."

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post #14 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Not necessarily have its own cellular, just that if it is going to be useful to people who do not want to take their phone out of their pocket to view general information, she should be able to communicate the exact information requested, when it is so clearly specific and also with time context, not just a Wikipedia page, particularly while driving. 

Siri. where is the nearest high ground to escape a flood?  I found this " Wikipedia definition of flood."

I would expect Siri but only though an iPhone which would basically add a flag to state you're requesting via the wrist worn device. This would lead to it not being the exact same information but something more limited and handled differently. For instance, anything that requires opening up Safari would tell you that you need to use your iPhone, but other info like appointments, reminders, daily steps, etc. it could read back and even display that simple information for you.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #15 of 38
Apple was so close with the 6th Gen iPod Nano. All it was missing to be a truly great device was bluetooth.
post #16 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
I would expect Siri but only though an iPhone which would basically add a flag to state you're requesting via the wrist worn device. This would lead to it not being the exact same information but something more limited and handled differently. For instance, anything that requires opening up Safari would tell you that you need to use your iPhone, but other info like appointments, reminders, daily steps, etc. it could read back and even display that simple information for you.

No matter how you slice it, Siri is just awful at doing anything but setting appointments or sending text messages, although I would never trust her to do that. She can convert knots to miles per hour reliably but if I had to really depend on her, she would just as likely make a sarcastic comment as offer some useful information. In my opinion Siri is about one tenth as usable as Google voice, maybe less because she causes me to become annoyed and lose my cool and I'm not just saying that because I am a Google fan, just that Siri fails 90% of the time for the things I ask her, but it is one more swipe and tap to get to Google but it is always worth it.


Edited by mstone - 5/25/14 at 7:05pm

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post #17 of 38
Everything in one chip, that's an interesting idea.
post #18 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Complicating Liquidmetal's possible appearance in Apple's iWatch is a deal with Switzerland's Swatch group that granted the horologists exclusive use of Liquidmetal in watches.
 

 

My feeling is that an Apple watch would be barely discernible as a smart watch... more likely (possibly several) (elegant) dress watch designs. The watch would exhibit hands and hour markers and possibly a minute rail, a display watch face that provides limited data display and alerts (set by user preference and current activity) and possibly a dynamic bezel. The overriding interest for Apple however, would be the watch as a super transducer. Apple would pack as much sensing capability into this device as physically possible. The watch would pass data processing and analysis off to the iPhone but provide limited data storage for those times when an iPhone cannot be found. Swatch, an approximately $10B Swiss company might be of interest to Apple for its patents, movement and other watch design, capabilities.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Swatch_Group

 

That probably, won't include noninvasive blood glucose monitoring or three-dimensional mapping, though. Apple is more likely to put its considerable resources to bear on more mundane, but still difficult tasks -- like integrating an application processor, baseband, and wireless communications controller in a single, smaller, less power-hungry chip.
 

Apple will only release an iWatch for utterly compelling reasons, not to be just another 'smart' watch manufacturer. Whatever 'big' health issues can be addressed with this device, Apple would at least look at very closely. Power hungry facilities though will be very, very carefully scrutinised and therefore, communications might be limited to ultra low-power bluetooth for example.

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post #19 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

The watch would exhibit hands and hour markers and possibly a minute rail, a display watch face that provides limited data display and alerts (set by user preference and current activity)

An OLED display with a that ultra thin Helvetic Neue font could reduce the power output to the display significantly. And they could use sensors to know when it's on your side and when you're lifting it up to be used.
Quote:
and possibly a dynamic bezel.

You know how dive watches have the physical bezel that can be turned? I could see an elegant solution that has a visceral clicking feel that would allow you to change modes, apps or whatever. This doesn't negate the need for a touchscreen, but it could add to it and make it natural to use.
Quote:
Apple will only release an iWatch for utterly compelling reasons, not to be just another 'smart' watch manufacturer. Whatever 'big' health issues can be addressed with this device, Apple would at least look at very closely. Power hungry facilities though will be very, very carefully scrutinised and therefore, communications might be limited to ultra low-power bluetooth for example.

When I look at nice watches, especially the smaller women's watches I wonder if we're there yet. I have no doubt that wearables are coming but I am not sure we're at a point where Apple can release a great wrist worn device that can be a worthwhile accessory to the iPhone (and potentially the iPad and Mac) without having such a horrible battery life or charging option that it kills interest as well as being something universally stylish without being more than a few hundred dollars..
Edited by SolipsismX - 5/27/14 at 4:57pm

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
When I look at nice watches, especially the smaller women's watches 

I've noticed that women are wearing large mens style watches lately. 

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post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I've noticed that women are wearing large mens style watches lately. 

That's good because there is no way you can give the same functionality and battery life to the range of small to large watches we have seen our whole lives.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #22 of 38
If iWatch can be a standalone device that is good for payments, texting & music I'm in
post #23 of 38
Originally Posted by Chez Whitey View Post
If iWatch can be a standalone device that is good for payments, texting & music I'm in

 

How do you propose to text from a watch face?

Originally Posted by Marvin

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post #24 of 38
Impressive article which puts together years of news and speculation. Whether everything listed above comes to fruition or not, I enjoyed reading it.
post #25 of 38

Exciting stuff! I can't wait and hope something, anything, will be announced at WWDC.

For your sake, I hope you're right.
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post #26 of 38

Both an "iWatch" and smart headphones would perfectly complement iPhone and increase Apples top and bottom lines. One or both might nicely fill in the product gap of the aging iPod. I see prices for either in the $399-$499 range. But which would I get?

 

I'm hoping for over-ear cans with built in iPod, however a smart wrist wearable with health monitoring (even without an OLED display-just sensors and BLE link to my iPhone) would be really, really cool. Maybe both will be announced this year? 

 

Take.My.Money!

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post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


An OLED display with a that ultra thin Helvetic Neue font could reduce the power output to the display significantly. And they could use sensors to know when it's on your side and when you're lifting it up to be used.
You know die watches have the physical bezel that can be turned? I could see an elegant solution that has a visceral clicking feel that would allow you to change modes, apps or whatever. This doesn't negate the need for a touchscreen, but it could add to it and make it natural to use.
When I look at nice watches, especially the smaller women's watches I wonder if we're there yet. I have no doubt that wearables are coming but I am not sure we're at a point where Apple can release a great wrist worn device that can be a worthwhile accessory to the iPhone (and potentially the iPad and Mac) without having such a horrible battery life or charging option that it kills interest as well as being something universally stylish without being more than a few hundred dollars..

I've looked at power requirements. An M7 chip clocked at even low-frequencies can still be more power hungry than the capacity of batteries in watches today that employ physical (motor driven) movements, by two orders of magnitude. I can't see how a smart watch today could get to within one order of magnitude. I agree, it just seems that we are currently perhaps, an order of magnitude behind the game in battery life and packaging over what we'd like to imagine an iWatch functionality/charge time would be. I would love to be wrong. :-)

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post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

How do you propose to text from a watch face?
My girl Siri.
Now if only I could rename her Computer
post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

I've looked at power requirements. An M7 chip clocked at even low-frequencies can still be more power hungry than the capacity of batteries in watches today that employ physical (motor driven) movements, by two orders of magnitude. I can't see how a smart watch today could get to within one order of magnitude. I agree, it just seems that we are currently perhaps, an order of magnitude behind the game in battery life and packaging over what we'd like to imagine an iWatch functionality/charge time would be. I would love to be wrong. :-)

It's my understanding that watch batteries are both small and don't utilize the densest capacity for its volume. What if they were to use the best LiPoly Ion battery tech and make the battery bigger? They still won't get the ability to go years without changing/charging, but what if it a week to 10 days of use and it charged completely in about 30 minutes (the time it takes to shower), like the Fitbit Force battery, and it had a smooth option to charge it, like inductive charging, no clumsy plug, unlike the Fitbit Force; I wonder if then it would be good enough to enter the market, assuming all other aspects of the technology are ready.
Edited by SolipsismX - 5/26/14 at 7:40am

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


It's my understand that qatch batteries are both small and don't utilize the densest capacity for its volume. What if they were to use the best LiPoly Ion battery tech and make the battery bigger? They still won't get the ability to go years without changing/charging, but what if it a week to 10 days of use and it charged completely in about 30 minutes (the time it takes to shower), like the Fitbit Force battery, and it had a smooth option to charge it, like inductive charging, no clumsy plug, unlike the Fitbit Force; I wonder if then it would be good enough to enter the market, assuming all other aspects of the technology are ready.

Actually, I looked at this some time ago and just realised that I told only half the story - sorry. Battery capacities to which I was referring were those capable of being recharged solely by a watch face solar panel, such as employed in my lovely Citizen Eco-Drive. With modern battery technology and external charging, I'm sure that at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance would be possible, providing perhaps an acceptable recharging regime. I agree 100% with your thoughts on charging. Placing the watch into a nice cradle, even nightly (although I agree that this probably wouldn't be required) would be quite attractive as opposed to fiddling with cables, which are also unsightly. I've been spoiled in never having had to wind a mechanism, recharge a battery and only seldom correct the time. :-)

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post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


It's my understanding that watch batteries are both small and don't utilize the densest capacity for its volume. What if they were to use the best LiPoly Ion battery tech and make the battery bigger? They still won't get the ability to go years without changing/charging, but what if it a week to 10 days of use and it charged completely in about 30 minutes (the time it takes to shower), like the Fitbit Force battery, and it had a smooth option to charge it, like inductive charging, no clumsy plug, unlike the Fitbit Force; I wonder if then it would be good enough to enter the market, assuming all other aspects of the technology are ready.

I was looking at TAG Heuer watches, such as this one:

 

https://shop-au.tagheuer.com/en/calibre-1887-automatic-chronograph-41-mm-car2111-ba0720.html

 

...which costs $5,850 locally and noted that one prominent feature is the use of a sapphire crystal cover glass. Apple might not be aiming for this market (is most surely not aiming for this market) but I'm becoming convinced that any iWatch will emulate such as these, be packed with sensing technology and as you wrote previously, a low-powered comms link.

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post #32 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

If Apple is planning on releasing an iWatch, I would imagine it will need to be very dependent on Siri. Unfortunately, Siri is almost unusable for general purposes. Just today, while I was driving I asked, "Who won the Indianapolis 500?" Sire responded with, "This is what I found". Of course I can't read the screen while driving, so I said please read it to me. The gibberish that followed was so incoherent I can't even remember what she said. Eventually when I was no longer driving I was able to see she had offered up a wikipedia page on the definition of Indy 500. Useless. After giving Siri first crack I then turned to Google and unsurprisingly got a full run down of the exciting conclusion of the final laps, all in clear voice, although she did have a bit of trouble with the name of the Brasilian native Hello Castroneves' pronunciation. 
I completely agree with you. I've had a very similar experience with Siri myself, while Google Now works flawlessly about 90 percent of the time for me. I only use Siri to call up my contacts and even that simple task can flummox it sometimes.
post #33 of 38

Those renderings are gross- Apple sheep branding bracelets. 

 
Where's the new Apple TV?
 
And still waiting for SolipsismX to prove his accusation:
"And yet they haven't loved Google Wallet which you claimed was the exact same thing and kept posting...
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Where's the new Apple TV?
 
And still waiting for SolipsismX to prove his accusation:
"And yet they haven't loved Google Wallet which you claimed was the exact same thing and kept posting...
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post #34 of 38
Originally Posted by Chez Whitey View Post
My girl Siri.

 

Who needs Internet access. Which you won’t have on the device.

Originally Posted by Marvin

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post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by winchester View Post

Okay, am I the only one who is AMAZED by the last prototype in that video?! Transparent screens as eye-glass lenses?! Forget your distaste for google Glass for one minute to consider the possibilities of that technology! We're talking Iron Man tech here! Can you imagine wearing a pair of discreet prescription glasses that lets you access your digital content without anyone knowing. Pair it with your phone, incorporate eye-tracking, as well as a camera, and you'll never need to look down at your phone or watch again! So long as the UI was "safe" and not too distracting, I think this could be the future. Exciting to think about anyway...

God forbid.

"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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post #36 of 38
Just a minor correction, but Intrinsity was involved in the Samsung and then A series of processors for Apple. This is fairly well known information. As to PA Semi, they where involved in Power PC design for Apple before Apple pulled the rug out from under them. They then switched to a secret project before being purchased by Apple. It is believed that the project was focussed on Arm development. In a sense Apple wrecked the company by its rapid and sudden change to Intel and had to pick up the pieces of PA Semi left over.
post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by winchester View Post

Okay, am I the only one who is AMAZED by the last prototype in that video?! Transparent screens as eye-glass lenses?! Forget your distaste for google Glass for one minute to consider the possibilities of that technology! We're talking Iron Man tech here! Can you imagine wearing a pair of discreet prescription glasses that lets you access your digital content without anyone knowing. Pair it with your phone, incorporate eye-tracking, as well as a camera, and you'll never need to look down at your phone or watch again! So long as the UI was "safe" and not too distracting, I think this could be the future. Exciting to think about anyway...

For general use, I don't want a conceptual overlay on my field of vision. I could envision specific use cases, of course.

post #38 of 38
The latest out this morning claims the iWatch will look very similar to Moto's previously announced 360 smartwatch... Round but perhaps a bit slimmer. If true it will look nothing like the bangle-bracelet style shown above that someone somewhere mocked up months ago as a possible design.
Edited by Gatorguy - 5/28/14 at 5:47am
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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