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Apple introduces HomeKit framework for connected homes

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
As part of Monday's unveiling of iOS 8, Apple took the covers off of HomeKit, a new framework for connected home devices that allows users to easily control those devices using iOS.




Apple says they worked with a number of manufactures, including large names like Cree and Haier, to create the system. Among the supported devices are smart locks, lights, cameras, doors, plugs, switches, and thermostats.

One feature, Secure Pairing, is designed to enhance security. Secure Pairing ensures that only the registered iOS device can activate connected items like locks, and is said to be quick to set up.




HomeKit also allows users to group devices into scenes or control devices individually. A number of lights in a living room could be grouped together to create a relaxing mood, for instance, while others could be turned on while working.

Additionally, HomeKit integrates with the Siri personal digital assistant. Users can tell Siri to turn on the lights in the living room or open the garage door.
post #2 of 42

We’re building a garage. Now we know what openers to buy. Not even a question of buying a dumb one anymore.

Originally posted by Marvin

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post #3 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

We’re building a garage. Now we know what openers to buy. Not even a question of buying a dumb one anymore.

 

All of Apple's announcements today have massive implications.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #4 of 42
Cool! I really like this.
post #5 of 42
I can't count the number of times I walk up to my door, car fob in hand wishing I could just unlock the door from that. Would be nice for those hands full moments.
post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

We’re building a garage. Now we know what openers to buy. Not even a question of buying a dumb one anymore.

I'm eyeballing Chamberlain or the dealer installed variety Liftmaster 

 

I will BURN my Genie opener in celebration once it's been installed. 

 

Can't wait to see how extensive Homekit is.  Siri control is going to be nice and likely a bit more reliable than IFTTT

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post #7 of 42

Apple User: "Hey Siri, I'm ready for bed"

Lights dim, ac drops 2 degree, confirms doors are locked and garage door is closed.

Siri: "Sleep Tight"

 

Google User: "OK Google, I'm ready for bed"

Google: "We noticed you you spent extra time in the bathroom today, please pick up your Nexus to confirm order- we have searched Google Shopping for Pepto Bismol and added a bottle to your cart" 

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post #8 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

 

All of Apple's announcements today have massive implications.

 

Yup- This and Healthkit have absolutely huge potential and lay critical groundwork. The stuff shown off today is infinitely more important than any new physical product- the products will come, but they will depend on the software and ecosystem for their existence. An iOS device will become such a powerful tool, and everything else will be crippled in comparison- simply because of the massive install base of the newest iOS version and the fact that every 3rd party vendor worth their salt will optimize for and support the APIs. This is what Apple has always done- create the software that makes a new physical product extremely desirable- and on that front, they've now exceeded all of their past efforts. We will eventually see a wearable from Apple, but after today, its usefulness and existence kis that much more tangible and clear- simply because of such frameworks like homekit and healthkit. 

post #9 of 42

Any idea if it's z-wave compatible?

post #10 of 42
Originally Posted by robotstorm View Post
Any idea if it's z-wave compatible?

 

That would depend on z-wave alone.

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #11 of 42
I like how apple is tackling really big fronts today - and they're doing it the apple way, secure and simple. This event was worth the wait.
post #12 of 42
I installed the Chamberlain thingie a few months ago and it rocks, but being able to say "Hey, Siri, did I leave the garage door open?" or "Hey, Siri, open the garage door" is really awesome.
post #13 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordJohnWhorfin View Post

I installed the Chamberlain thingie a few months ago and it rocks, but being able to say "Hey, Siri, did I leave the garage door open?" or "Hey, Siri, open the garage door" is really awesome.

How long did it take you to install?  I'm hearing average install is about 4 hours. 

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post #14 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

 

Yup- This and Healthkit have absolutely huge potential and lay critical groundwork. The stuff shown off today is infinitely more important than any new physical product- the products will come, but they will depend on the software and ecosystem for their existence. An iOS device will become such a powerful tool, and everything else will be crippled in comparison- simply because of the massive install base of the newest iOS version and the fact that every 3rd party vendor worth their salt will optimize for and support the APIs. This is what Apple has always done- create the software that makes a new physical product extremely desirable- and on that front, they've now exceeded all of their past efforts. We will eventually see a wearable from Apple, but after today, its usefulness and existence kis that much more tangible and clear- simply because of such frameworks like homekit and healthkit. 

agreed.

 

The home just became an iPhone accessory.   Just like your car did.

and pretty soon your body.

 

This will take time.   Home Automation is 'hard'  Nest did a great job in 'learning' and overriding  learning.   But things like complex scenes (turn on and off lights inside and out as if we are in the house [aka vacation mode]) are complex for the average person to grok.   And the hard stuff (I want my irrigation system to "turn on at 4 in the morning on Tuesday if less than .5" rain fell in the last 7 days, and turning off once the 7 day water total reaches .75in [with a sanity loop to make sure I haven't sprung a massive leak, then turn off immediately], UNLESS the forecast is for greater than 40% chance of rain today or tomorrow., then delay one day.  Oh and if it's going to rain, please make sure my windows are closed.), is hard (wife says... just make it work.)

 

Like I want proximity... I walk up to the door... if it's locked, it unlocks.  I walk away and it's unlocked, it locks... if I leave the door ajar, my phone tells me [your door is not a door... it's a jar].  It would be really nice if it 'beacons' for that ability [identify friend or foe  bluetooth]... as opposed to motion detection....   That's cool.  As it is now... I have to play a scene... unlock front door, from my phone.   hard if my hands are full.

post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

That would depend on z-wave alone.

probably not.  Zwave is a signaling (mesh network) standard, not a company/device.  I doubt Apple will use it's radios to talk to it, More like if there will be an automation controller that does exposes the ZWave network to an HomeKit controller app. 

 

There are a few home automation 'standards' '(the good thing about standards are... there are so many to choose from' ;-) ) , time will tell if this is a shot across their bow, or an opportunity to integrate with HomeKit, and tie disparate stds together.

 

I'm not keen of having an IoT in my house connected to the Internet of Internets... I don't want my lights to have their own IP addresses on my 'home network.'  I want minimally an 'air gap' between my Home Automation system and my main network, and then a very secured interface from the home network (one device that can't program, just send commands, and retrieve responses) that can talk to the iOS device.   I'd hate to have some poorly design lightbulb embedded TCP controller be the pivot point used in attacking my home network.

 

I'm curious if HomeKit can handle that intermediate separation (or be on 2 WiFis at once).

post #16 of 42
Does this mean that when you say "Open the pod bay doors" it won't come back with a pithy response any more?
post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordJohnWhorfin View Post

I installed the Chamberlain thingie a few months ago and it rocks, but being able to say "Hey, Siri, did I leave the garage door open?" or "Hey, Siri, open the garage door" is really awesome.

Until Siri refuses and tries to kill you.
post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

Until Siri refuses and tries to kill you.

"I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.."
Slam!
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post #19 of 42

Anyone notice that Nest wasn't on the list of companies they flashed on the screen?  I assume Nest can use this, since its an open API, but still a little "F--- you." to Nest/Google.  :lol:

post #20 of 42
Originally Posted by eponymous View Post
Anyone notice that Nest wasn't on the list of companies they flashed on the screen?  I assume Nest can use this, since its an open API, but still a little "F--- you." to Nest/Google.  :lol:

 

As Craig went past, he hit thermostats. I said out loud, “Ha! And it’s not Nest!”

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post #21 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 
Originally Posted by eponymous View Post
Anyone notice that Nest wasn't on the list of companies they flashed on the screen?  I assume Nest can use this, since its an open API, but still a little "F--- you." to Nest/Google.  :lol:

 

As Craig went past, he hit thermostats. I said out loud, “Ha! And it’s not Nest!”

 

Yeah baby !

I immediately noticed both of those incidents with great satisfaction, loved the great Honeywell shot, although I cringed that they still favor Gaggle for search, but at least they went with Bing translation.

post #22 of 42

I can't really see the use of this -- though I know it will be super-useful to others.  Although, if I can get a new HDTV that has HomeKit connectivity, maybe I can.

 

"Siri, I'd like to watch a Blu-Ray movie now."

 

"OK, Aaron.  Turning on your TV and Blu-Ray player.  I'm also shutting down the lights and putting Cassie [my iPhone] on vibrate."

 

"Thanks Siri.  I love you."

 

"Aww, Aaron.  You shouldn't have."

 

 

Umm ... OK, forget those last two lines.

 

:)

post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfc1138 View Post

I can't count the number of times I walk up to my door, car fob in hand wishing I could just unlock the door from that. Would be nice for those hands full moments.

Ah crap...flat battery on my cell phone...now where did I hide that key again?

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post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

This will take time.   Home Automation is 'hard'  Nest did a great job in 'learning' and overriding  learning.   But things like complex scenes (turn on and off lights inside and out as if we are in the house [aka vacation mode]) are complex for the average person to grok.   And the hard stuff (I want my irrigation system to "turn on at 4 in the morning on Tuesday if less than .5" rain fell in the last 7 days, and turning off once the 7 day water total reaches .75in [with a sanity loop to make sure I haven't sprung a massive leak, then turn off immediately], UNLESS the forecast is for greater than 40% chance of rain today or tomorrow., then delay one day.  Oh and if it's going to rain, please make sure my windows are closed.), is hard (wife says... just make it work.)
The Apple way is to ask what types of plants you have and which zones, and get moisture and rainfall data.

Home automation is hard, until you give people an easy way to see logical modes of operation and build that into your life. Lighting control can be pretty simple in terms of UI, but it takes a lot of complexity behind the scenes to make it work well. You need to know the balance of mood and function, and respond to ambient conditions. It all needs to be integrated together, which doesn't work too well if your only source of light is a big light in the center of the room.

Was there any word on Sonos?
post #25 of 42
I bet a ton of "smart hubs" will start popping up soon. Similar to Revolv http://revolv.com
post #26 of 42

HomeKit appears to  be a simple start but still has enough configurability to grow. 

 

You basically group your home into parts starting with the entire home, rooms and Zones   This way Siri can 

easily understand a command like "Turn off all lights downstairs". 

 

All this is kept in a database so each device will not need to be reprogrammed and is easily editable.   I suspect that HomeKit will 

grow as the market in general grows but it should be easy to get off the ground running and deliver some utility. 

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post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post
 

Apple User: "Hey Siri, I'm ready for bed"

Lights dim, ac drops 2 degree, confirms doors are locked and garage door is closed.

Siri: "Sleep Tight"

 

Google User: "OK Google, I'm ready for bed"

Google: "We noticed you you spent extra time in the bathroom today, please pick up your Nexus to confirm order- we have searched Google Shopping for Pepto Bismol and added a bottle to your cart" 

 

More like: 

Apple User: "Hey Siri, I'm ready for bed"

Siri: "I'm sorry, I don't know what 'I'm ready for fed' means" 

 

Apple User: "I'm ready for b-e-d"

Siri: "doing search for 'I'm ready for bed'"

 

I really can't believe with all these great features being added, the old ones (Siri / Maps) are not vastly improved!! What confidence do I have in the new, if the old continues to disappoint? 

post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

 

More like: 

Apple User: "Hey Siri, I'm ready for bed"

Siri: "I'm sorry, I don't know what 'I'm ready for fed' means" 

 

Apple User: "I'm ready for b-e-d"

Siri: "doing search for 'I'm ready for bed'"

 

I really can't believe with all these great features being added, the old ones (Siri / Maps) are not vastly improved!! What confidence do I have in the new, if the old continues to disappoint? 

 

You know, Siri almost always (like well into the high 90% area) understands exactly what I am saying.  Maybe you need some diction classes or something.

 

And they said that Siri had been improved.  Why not wait and see before you criticize?

post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

We will eventually see a wearable from Apple, but after today, its usefulness and existence kis that much more tangible and clear- simply because of such frameworks like homekit and healthkit. 

 

Are you thinking that an iWatch could be a controller for home automation, or how do you envision wearables contributing to the usefulness of the new frameworks?

 

I haven't been able to think of any reason I'd want an iWatch, but this could be one. If, instead of picking up my phone and opening an app, I could just talk to my wrist to unlock the door or turn on the light, that would be really handy. Or "wristy."

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V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

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post #30 of 42

Well, I'm one who hopes Nest will support this. We have five Nest thermostats throughout our home.

 

Put it this way -- if Nest doesn't support this, or if they support it only half-assedly, somebody on eBay will get a great deal on five Nests. Not because they aren't great machines, but because of what it would say about the company post-Google.

 

That said, I'm confident they will support it, and well. It's the Android people I feel sorry for, when their "Google Home" is hacked.

post #31 of 42
I am hoping for an open system that any device can connect. Hopefully some standard is made that will allow devices to be controlled from a simple web browser.
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenThousandThings View Post
 

Well, I'm one who hopes Nest will support this. We have five Nest thermostats throughout our home.

 

Put it this way -- if Nest doesn't support this, or if they support it only half-assedly, somebody on eBay will get a great deal on five Nests. Not because they aren't great machines, but because of what it would say about the company post-Google.

 

That said, I'm confident they will support it, and well. It's the Android people I feel sorry for, when their "Google Home" is hacked.

5 Thermostats?????  That's not a home...that is a Castle.  :D

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post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post
 

5 Thermostats?????  That's not a home...that is a Castle.  :D

Yeah, we went a little crazy with breaking the house up into zones for heating… Two of them are just one room each -- a guest bathroom and a guest bedroom that currently has an 89-year old living in it. But we saved 20% in fuel costs the first year -- most of that is from switching an 1880 farmhouse over from forced-air to radiant heat (under the floors), but I'd like to think some of it is from the zones.

post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenThousandThings View Post
 

Yeah, we went a little crazy with breaking the house up into zones for heating… Two of them are just one room each -- a guest bathroom and a guest bedroom that currently has an 89-year old living in it. But we saved 20% in fuel costs the first year -- most of that is from switching an 1880 farmhouse over from forced-air to radiant heat (under the floors), but I'd like to think some of it is from the zones.

 

Very impressive.   It's difficult to retrofit a near 90 year old house with modern HVAC but I love the sounds of more control for rooms and the radiant heating is something I'm looking to do.  Who'd you go through for the Radiant Heating?   I'm keeping an eye on www.warmboard.com but it'll be years before we actually make that move. 

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post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post
It's difficult to retrofit a near 90 year old house with modern HVAC but I love the sounds of more control for rooms and the radiant heating is something I'm looking to do.  Who'd you go through for the Radiant Heating?   I'm keeping an eye on www.warmboard.com but it'll be years before we actually make that move. 

 

We used Uponor "Joist Trak" heat transfer panels under the original floors, with Uponor's system of tubing and connectors -- http://www.uponorpro.com

 

My brother (a skilled contractor) and I did the work, and we ordered the materials online, but you do need some specialized tools. We had access because the downstairs ceilings had to be pulled down (two layers of sheetrock on top of 1x3 and the original plaster and lathe -- we gained about 3 inches in ceiling height in the process).

 

The only real surprise was the panels do expand and contract, producing popping noises like radiators do, especially when you insulate them like we did. If I could do it again, I probably wouldn't use the reflective insulation under the second floor like we did -- I'd only use it in the basement where it really matters.

 

Warmboard wasn't an option for us, but it is a great product, and they don't mind working with DIY projects. We will probably use it under our kitchen (which is not original, but a later addition), if we ever get around to that.

post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post
 

 

You know, Siri almost always (like well into the high 90% area) understands exactly what I am saying.  Maybe you need some diction classes or something.

 

And they said that Siri had been improved.  Why not wait and see before you criticize?

 

Oh my gosh! you are so right. Just because YOU don't have an issue with something, everyone that does, it is their own fault. What brilliance! 

 

If Siri was so good, why did they have to improve it? More so, why are there countless jokes out there about Siri messing up what people say? [my fav below] 

 

If they improved it so much, why were there no highlights on these improvements? 

 

Quote:

Mom texts her son using Siri and says 'If you and Jen are hungry, why don't you come over and join your father and I?' hoping to have them over for dinner. 

 

Mom was curious as the son did not reply back for a while. When he did, the reply was 'Really Mom?' 

 

The mom then read what Siri typed 'If you and Jen are horney, why don't you come over and join your father and I?' 

post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

 

Oh my gosh! you are so right. Just because YOU don't have an issue with something, everyone that does, it is their own fault. What brilliance! 

 

If Siri was so good, why did they have to improve it? More so, why are there countless jokes out there about Siri messing up what people say? [my fav below] 

 

If they improved it so much, why were there no highlights on these improvements? 

 

 

Personally I am convinced that Siri works for most people.  But negative opinions are always going to be loudest, since people with no problems rarely have a reason to post in the first place.

 

And just because something is a really good product doesn't mean that a company shouldn't work to improve it.  Working to improve products should be an on-going, constant pursuit, no matter how good one believes a particular product to be.

post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post
 

 

Personally I am convinced that Siri works for most people.  But negative opinions are always going to be loudest, since people with no problems rarely have a reason to post in the first place.

 

And just because something is a really good product doesn't mean that a company shouldn't work to improve it.  Working to improve products should be an on-going, constant pursuit, no matter how good one believes a particular product to be.

 

Convinced you shall be, proof you have not. I don't know but one personally that Siri works well for, and most don't even use it due to that fact. I understand I know of only 20 people personally that I have talked to about this, but with only 1 saying it works, that can't be good. 

 

I bet you think Maps and Touch ID worked for most people before fixes? Touch ID is now 100% for me after the second fix, while Maps is now a feature issue vs. functionality.  My point is that Siri has a LONG way to go before becoming a 'personal assistant'. 

post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

 

Convinced you shall be, proof you have not. I don't know but one personally that Siri works well for, and most don't even use it due to that fact. I understand I know of only 20 people personally that I have talked to about this, but with only 1 saying it works, that can't be good. 

 

I bet you think Maps and Touch ID worked for most people before fixes? Touch ID is now 100% for me after the second fix, while Maps is now a feature issue vs. functionality.  My point is that Siri has a LONG way to go before becoming a 'personal assistant'. 

 

I don't use Maps, so it's not something on which I can comment.  But no, I never had any trouble with Touch ID.  Worked out of the box for me.

post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post
 

 

I don't use Maps, so it's not something on which I can comment.  But no, I never had any trouble with Touch ID.  Worked out of the box for me.

 

You must have been one that could not understand all those complaints about accelerators sticking in vehicles because when you drove your's off the lot, it worked just fine! 

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