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First look: Apple's new aesthetic for OS X Yosemite

post #1 of 146
Thread Starter 
OS X Yosemite -- the next version of Apple's venerable desktop operating system -- will bring a major visual overhaul to OS X for the first time in the software's history. AppleInsider takes a look at some of the changes coming this fall.

OS X Yosemite


First impressions

Overall, OS X Yosemite sits in an uncanny valley between its more detailed heritage and the spartan adornment of iOS under Jony Ive. Some icons have an odd mix of flat and three-dimensional elements, for instance, and new form control animations -- such as the new slide/blink combination when switching radio buttons -- are slow and give an impression of lag in the operating system.

This is not particularly surprising, given the huge amount of baggage OS X carries and the monumental task of rebuilding the entire user experience of two flagship operating systems back to back, but the Apple human interface group has a long road ahead.

Finder




Finder maintains a familiar layout, but all of the icons and controls have been redesigned. Icons are slightly thinner and sharper, while controls are now a stark white-grey gradient. The side bar and toolbar are now translucent, allowing the background to show through.

Spotlight




Spotlight has been given the most radical makeover. No longer confined to its spot in the upper-right corner of the display, it will now show up as a translucent overlay in the middle of the screen. It also gains a built-in preview pane, making searching much easier.

Dock




The dock eschews the recent three-dimensionality and returns to its flat roots. The icons for default apps have been reimagined, but many of them retain elements of depth, unlike their more stark iOS counterparts.

Notification Center




Notification Center is now far more information-dense than it was in the past, and migrating widgets from the dashboard -- which still exists in the early Yosemite previews -- to Notification Center looks to be a welcome change. Notably, Notification Center is by far the most iOS-like design on the desktop, with virtually zero depth.

Safari




Much of Safari's functionality remains the same, but it comes in a far more compact layout. The favorites bar dropdown is jarring, and Apple would be wise to give users the option to disable it.

Notes & Reminders




Notes maintains its faux paper background, a glaring anomaly in the larger design concept, while Reminders now matches its iOS counterpart. Strangely, the Notes sidebar is not translucent -- the Reminders sidebar is -- and it remains to be seen whether this was a conscious choice or a mistake.
post #2 of 146
I like it. Really not a huge change- the most noticeable thing to me is the removal of the 3D dock- the icons are modest changes to say the least. People comparing this to windows 8 need their eyes checked. The only icons that changed to bolder colors are notes (tiny strip of bright yellow at top) and iTunes (going from Blue to red). Outside of that, id love to hear detail about those outlandish claims of looking like Windows- which we won't have. Trolls just use blanket statements.

I do think they should have kept the same icons across the board for both iOS and OSX. Not sure why there is a difference.

Can't help but think of that moron in the other thread that said their round icons copied samsung tizen. Nothing changed to round. 1hmm.gif Some people are blinded regardless of what the truth is...

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post #3 of 146
I like that the translucency is across the board now, instead of just being in iOS. Someone was commenting that it's like Aero returned, just in a different OS. Personally I think Apple's implementation is better than Aero, but either way it's nice to have.

As for the dock...I have the same thing on my PowerBook running Tiger. 1biggrin.gif
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Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
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post #4 of 146

I'm impartial about the UI color schemes. I like the lighter colors, lighter buttons, and starker contrast of color with it, but I find it kind of weird that the sidebars of apps are slightly transparent (like in Finder) and transparencies are laid seemingly randomly on top of each other... almost to "just do it". But as I have yet to use it in person because DP1's are normally terrible and I'm not willing to sacrifice my stable OS X for iOS 8 dev yet, I'm sure I'll have a stronger feeling (either positive or negative, I'm leaving room for either) towards it after a little playing around.

 

Overall, though, Yosemite will be ballin' in terms of the underlying components built into it.

post #5 of 146

I'm sure animation speeds and currently inconsistent UI features such as the non-translucent sidebar in Notes will be dealt with before the final release.

 

Overall I like it - especially the more compact title/toolbars on some apps - again I hope this extends to all the apps where this makes sense.

 

But the bookmarks feature in Safari really should move to a tool icon alongside the location bar.

post #6 of 146

I really did not like the new OS X.  But will be migrating.  

The color contrast is sharp against the too much WHITE quotient of the entire OS and its hurting eyes.

May be, I will run in poweruser mode.  

 

Does Power user mode make windows look like HUD Windows?  Or just the menus turn to Black?   

 

SNOW LEOPARD: still the best.   :???:   I am still young (?) but still dont like the new colory colory peppy themes. :/

 

Just look at the below screenshot, its just cool and gentle.

 

 

Of all, what I liked yesterday was the tight integration (correct word?) of Desktop OS with mobile OS.  I am really happy that Apple is very keen on that and is making it.   Great going.  No other major company is doing it. (Microsoft has single OS for both mobile and Desktop OS, but still that is not right and relevant)


Edited by Chandra69 - 6/3/14 at 6:43am
post #7 of 146
Ivy is GREATLY overrated as a UI designer.
post #8 of 146

I wish Apple would finally end this Sturm und Drang aesthetic metamorphosis and get on with revamping major parts of the OS. What I keep hoping for is another Leopard- Snow Leopard release cycle, catching - and surpassing - competing operating systems in core technologies. Instead, Apple seems to be focussing on window dressing and extensions, and less on major components that need updating or overhaul, like the woeful file system, kludgy Finder, and awkward networking. Losing focus, Apple.

post #9 of 146

Can you still hide the Finder toolbar so the window behaviour reverts back to multi-window, spatial mode?

post #10 of 146

I'm astonished that people complain about little change. The pace has been remarkable. The technical moves are important however it serves the end-user experience. There are so many little changes that all add up to a fantastic whole. The search always seemed a little lost over there in the corner. Integration with iOS is huge: Continuity, Handoff, AirDrop, Cloud iDrive, SMS, phone integration. But iOS isn't the whole story. The platform is.

 

Not to beat on someone doing things badly, but I keep contrasting this progression of OSs with the zipping back and forth coming out of Redmond. They're thrashing around and generating lots and lots of talk but they've alienated the vast majority of their customers. They can't make an argument for upgrading. Anyone concerned that this is a ho hum roll out should consider what can go wrong with an OS upgrade. 

 

OS X upgrades are done right. This is setting the stage for putting their ecosystem in service of our day to day needs.

post #11 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post
 

I wish Apple would finally end this Sturm und Drang aesthetic metamorphosis and get on with revamping major parts of the OS. What I keep hoping for is another Leopard- Snow Leopard release cycle, catching - and surpassing - competing operating systems in core technologies. Instead, Apple seems to be focussing on window dressing and extensions, and less on major components that need updating or overhaul, like the woeful file system, kludgy Finder, and awkward networking. Losing focus, Apple.

I have to agree with you.

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post #12 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post
 

I wish Apple would finally end this Sturm und Drang aesthetic metamorphosis and get on with revamping major parts of the OS. What I keep hoping for is another Leopard- Snow Leopard release cycle, catching - and surpassing - competing operating systems in core technologies. Instead, Apple seems to be focussing on window dressing and extensions, and less on major components that need updating or overhaul, like the woeful file system, kludgy Finder, and awkward networking. Losing focus, Apple.

 

I'm sorry, but making such a statement as Apple losing focus, after yesterday's presentation and especially state of the union address makes me wonder whether we're living in the same reality.

 

Apple has shown that it is committed to developing the best software out there and enable third party devs to do so. They've invested heavily into new technologies. Just take a look at the new programming language, at the new dev tools, the APIs now available on iOS, etc. This is really HUGE.

 

For me personally, Apple just eliminated all doubts I might have had about the future. Don't worry, all those ageing matters will be resolved over time and it will once again be a surprise as huge as yesterday's announcements.

 

What we've seen now, is that Apple's investments into tools, compilers, etc, which happened over the past few years were not random. They've been working on those things with clear goals for the future. Yesterday it all came together and at the same time this is probably just the foundation of what is to come next.

post #13 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post
 

I wish Apple would finally end this Sturm und Drang aesthetic metamorphosis and get on with revamping major parts of the OS... 

 

What I see is a tick-tock every-other-year process with iOS and OS X. One year is powerful under-the-hood changes. The next is focused on lots of important surface elements that make people's experience better, easier and more rich. Last year's OS X had huge performance tweaks, and the iOS moved entirely to 64-bit. A huge undertaking. So this year is the tock year. Still seems like the Leopard/SnowLeopard process to me.

post #14 of 146
So far I see a hot mess. I'm sure that will improve over time, but I really expected this would be a little further along by now.
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post #15 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shogun View Post
 

 

What I see is a tick-tock every-other-year process with iOS and OS X. One year is powerful under-the-hood changes. The next is focused on lots of important surface elements that make people's experience better, easier and more rich. Last year's OS X had huge performance tweaks, and the iOS moved entirely to 64-bit. A huge undertaking. So this year is the tock year. Still seems like the Leopard/SnowLeopard process to me.

 

As for OS X Yosemite, I see mostly interface gimmicks or extensions of existing capabilities. In five years, half will vanish or be renamed. "Tick-tock" is becoming a worn-out cliché in the industry. As the article points out, many features are still inconsistent in implementation. You would expect Apple to have finally settled the OS down in the tock cycle, if that is what Yosemite is supposed to be. iOS 64-bit - different article, mate. OS X Mavericks huge performance tweaks - not really. More hyperbole than substance, I fear.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post
 

 

I'm sorry, but making such a statement as Apple losing focus, after yesterday's presentation and especially state of the union address makes me wonder whether we're living in the same reality.

 

Apple has shown that it is committed to developing the best software out there and enable third party devs to do so. They've invested heavily into new technologies. Just take a look at the new programming language, at the new dev tools, the APIs now available on iOS, etc. This is really HUGE.

 

For me personally, Apple just eliminated all doubts I might have had about the future. Don't worry, all those ageing matters will be resolved over time and it will once again be a surprise as huge as yesterday's announcements.

 

What we've seen now, is that Apple's investments into tools, compilers, etc, which happened over the past few years were not random. They've been working on those things with clear goals for the future. Yesterday it all came together and at the same time this is probably just the foundation of what is to come next.

 

 

For a "cynic" you sure sound like the marketing department at Apple. I do want to ask you one question:

 

Just how many Computer Science Departments at US universities (or reputable international ones) will actually offer accredited classes in Swift as part of a CS or Engineering degree curriculum? Yeah, I seriously doubt it.

 

Dev tools, new APIs, this trick or that - in the end, if they sell more Macs and iPads, then great. Still, the core technologies of what an OS is supposed to do seem to have been neglected yet again.

 

What helped Apple reestablish itself and regain credibility and mindshare in the industry was its enthusiastic embrace of Unix and Intel. In recent years, they seem to be drifting back to the candy store mentality of the 90s with more proprietary technologies and a walled-garden approach. 

 

Where is Apple's centre of gravity? No matter how big Apple may be presently, it still doesn't have the gravitational pull of the entire industry.

 

I hope I'm wrong, as I have a lifetime (and small fortune) invested in Apple tech ....

post #16 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by xgman View Post

So far I see a hot mess. I'm sure that will improve over time, but I really expected this would be a little further along by now.

How is it a hot mess? And in what way did you expect it to be further along?
post #17 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by xgman View Post

So far I see a hot mess. I'm sure that will improve over time, but I really expected this would be a little further along by now.

Congratulations, you're the only one that sees that. "Further along"? What? Well, I guess there always has to be someone like you with reactions that are completely mind boggling and disconnected from reality.
post #18 of 146
Focus schmocus! There's some real functionality built in to the new aesthetic, but in any case everybody adjusts to changes in appearance and moves on. Before long the previous normal comes to look, well, quaint.

The big news here is Continuity, the suite of services that spread across Macs and iDevices. Not only are these interesting in their own right, but they represent capabilities that can't readily be implemented in competitive devices. (Windows 8/Phone could potentially be an exception to that; however they're not really a factor in the market.)
post #19 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilM View Post

Focus schmocus! There's some real functionality built in to the new aesthetic, but in any case everybody adjusts to changes in appearance and moves on. Before long the previous normal comes to look, well, quaint.

The big news here is Continuity, the suite of services that spread across Macs and iDevices. Not only are these interesting in their own right, but they represent capabilities that can't readily be implemented in competitive devices. (Windows 8/Phone could potentially be an exception to that; however they're not really a factor in the market.)

 

Services? Yawn. They have been around for quite a while in OS X and still most people don't use them. Interoperability with iOS devices and OS X? Yeah, OK, I think they have been calling that convergence for a couple decades now. Still, I don't see that much to get excited over, yet.

 

Let's read what John Siracusa writes about Yosemite in a few months - then we'll have the final verdict.

post #20 of 146
Moving the Spotlight window seems really strange to me. The click area with the magnifying glass is still top right, right? So they've made the window pop up in a completely different place to where you click, which seems like bad UI to me. I realise you can keyboard launch and browse Spotlight too, but I don't really see that as an excuse, there's no new functionality in Spotlight that demands it be in the centre of the screen.

To be clear, the improved Spotlight seems great and I look forward to using it, I just question the wisdom in moving the window.

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post #21 of 146

Is it too soon to ask about Min-Sys-Reqts to run Yosemite?

 

I was pleasantly surprised when our early-2009 Al-Macbook (the 6-month window of Aluminum-but-not-Pro [no sD slot]), could run Mavericks.  Core 2 Duo.

 

I'm imagining it will be (fairly) cut off from Yosemite.

 

How about a late 2009 27" iMac (the first 27", core i7).  That should get Yosemite, yes?

post #22 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post
 

 

As for OS X Yosemite, I see mostly interface gimmicks or extensions of existing capabilities. In five years, half will vanish or be renamed. "Tick-tock" is becoming a worn-out cliché in the industry. As the article points out, many features are still inconsistent in implementation. You would expect Apple to have finally settled the OS down in the tock cycle, if that is what Yosemite is supposed to be. iOS 64-bit - different article, mate. OS X Mavericks huge performance tweaks - not really. More hyperbole than substance, I fear.

 

 

For a "cynic" you sure sound like the marketing department at Apple. I do want to ask you one question:

 

Just how many Computer Science Departments at US universities (or reputable international ones) will actually offer accredited classes in Swift as part of a CS or Engineering degree curriculum? Yeah, I seriously doubt it.

 

Dev tools, new APIs, this trick or that - in the end, if they sell more Macs and iPads, then great. Still, the core technologies of what an OS is supposed to do seem to have been neglected yet again.

 

What helped Apple reestablish itself and regain credibility and mindshare in the industry was its enthusiastic embrace of Unix and Intel. In recent years, they seem to be drifting back to the candy store mentality of the 90s with more proprietary technologies and a walled-garden approach. 

 

Where is Apple's centre of gravity? No matter how big Apple may be presently, it still doesn't have the gravitational pull of the entire industry.

 

I hope I'm wrong, as I have a lifetime (and small fortune) invested in Apple tech ....

 

 

Well, I might not be serving my nickname any justice by posting as positively, however this is simply because I am truly psyched by those announcements. That's the only reason, and yes, the language itself is -that- great and I have to work with those things every day.

 

First off, no university offers Swift courses yet, because the language is completely new and has just been announced by Apple. It does not matter how many universities (I don't know about US, I'm from Europe here) will teach Swift classes and how many accredited courses you get. This is not how this particular part of the industry works.

 

I for one wouldn't care what you got in your CV or how many so called accredited courses you made for a specific language. Universities teach programming. If you've understood those concepts, picking up a new language should be a breeze, especially if you can keep on using existing, well established frameworks, which are much harder to get used to an learn over a language in most cases. What really matters is what you can do. And hostly, I haven't seen any known iOS or Mac shop actually caring much for paper qualification when looking for talent.

 

However, if we play out your logic, iOS should have failed. The App Store should have failed, simply because no University was really caring about Objective-C nor offering any accredited courses for that. Neither is Apple, in comparison to Sun/Oracle, etc. By that logic, everyone should be developing for Android first and Android's app quality should be much higher, because they use a language that is being thought at Universities for over a decade. And still the opposite is true.

 

Regarding Apple's credibility and Unix... I partially agree, because I'm coming from this field originally as well and I just love the fact that OS X is a certified Unix. However, I am not so sure this fact has anything to do with Apple's comeback. NeXT itself, while technologically brilliant and advanced, wasn't very successful and only serving a tiny niche of the overall enterprise market.

 

I believe Apple managed to come back as strong as it did, because even so many years later, NeXT's tech was still as good and because Apple managed to integrate it and come up with a system that could actually compete. Also note that OS X, while being built on top of UNIX, wasn't UNIX certified until Leopard. So again, official accreditation is a nice thing, but I doubt it actually had anything to do with Apple's success.

 

In fact, if we take a look at Apple's presence in the enterprise market and recent decisions such as axing the Xserve clearly show that Apple never really managed to penetrate enterprise in a noteworthy way, except for creative professionals.

 

And yet, funnily enough, after failing in the enterprise, axing their only server model, refocusing their professional server OS into a small business server OS, Apple finally became dominant in enterprise, with mobile devices. Devices that were intended for consumers originally, tablets, which judging by some voices weren't even meant for content creation or "real work", devices which were supposed to be crushed by Android or tablet offerings meant for "real work" (Surface). None of this happened, enterprise and educators keep adopting iOS devices like crazy, despite the fact that you won't find any "Apple Certified Developers", despite using a language that is as old as PCs and nobody really teaches at large scale.

 

---

 

What I am trying to say, and this applies to the file system theory as well is:

 

People often take what currently exists and project those thoughts to Apple. People have been asking themselves why apple kept on using ObjC for a long time now. Why didn't Apple switch to something already established out there? Why not one of those many nice managed languages? The same goes for file systems. Sure, HFS needs an overhaul and there are probably more than a dozen better and more advanced file systems out there. However, considering all the ground work Apple has been doing and is still doing in terms of technology, I believe it would be foolish to assume Apple to just use ZFS or anything established out there. Apple sure knows HFS has its problems better than we do. I'm sure they're working on something new, perhaps along a more revamped OS core. At the same time I am sure that when Apple announced their new filesystem, which might not be similar to how we think of one these days, it will be as big a bang as their new programming language and it will make other filesystems out there cower in fear.

 

But hey, that's just my personal opinion. :)

post #23 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post
 

"OS X Mavericks huge performance tweaks - not really. More hyperbole than substance, I fear.

 

- Just how many Computer Science Departments at US universities (or reputable international ones) will actually offer accredited classes in Swift as part of a CS or Engineering degree curriculum? Yeah, I seriously doubt it.

 

Dev tools, new APIs, this trick or that - in the end, if they sell more Macs and iPads, then great. Still, the core technologies of what an OS is supposed to do seem to have been neglected yet again."

 

This has got to be willfully misguided. 

 

As it seems, you are not a developer, you have no had even the slightest crack at the under the hood improvements that exist within Yosemite nor iOS (other than public media) - or how the two OSs relate to each other in terms of development and infrastructure. Yosemite will be a technically solid release, building and expanding on the technologies in the direction Apple established back in 2007 with Lion and new ones with iOS 7 and Mavericks. There might be some new UI, but I guarantee that the team building it isn't working on core technologies - because another team exists solely to tackle those.

 

Second: YES. Computer science departments will teach Swift as accredited classes, just like they've done with Objective-C and the iOS SDK. Why? Because people are making livings off of it, there is great technical knowledge not bound solely to Swift, and the main reason: ​Because people will pay to learn it in the hopes to making money in the long run and they want to learn it. Universities are just like any business, they will offer what people want, in order to get those pennies and fame. And people want to build iOS apps. iOS is popular and profitable, it's off base to say otherwise.

 

 

Honestly, if your views are so negative towards the path Apple is taking, I don't see why you keep any money, let alone a lifetime's worth, sit in bed with them. 

post #24 of 146
There is a difference between reflected colors (such as on poster boards and computer hardware) and projected color (such as on a monitor). All this white would look great on a poster board, but it is painful to look at on a monitor.

Apple does not use Mail internally, they use Outlook, which means they use Outlook Exchange running on Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2. iCloud is hosted at least in part on Windows and Linux servers. They never used Pages, which is why they were out of touch with the users and made it over for fourth graders. This UI, which would look great on poster board in a meeting, is painful on a screen. So I wonder, does Jony Ive use a Mac?

Why is Apple continuing with the only UI they have ever produced that is controversial? When have Mac users ever complained of eye pain and unreadability before? This is all unprecedented.

I joked with an Apple Store employee that Apple uses PCs with Windows in Cupertino. I expected her to laugh dismissively. Instead, she looked worried and said, quietly, "I hope not."
post #25 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post
 

I wish Apple would finally end this Sturm und Drang aesthetic metamorphosis and get on with revamping major parts of the OS. What I keep hoping for is another Leopard- Snow Leopard release cycle, catching - and surpassing - competing operating systems in core technologies. Instead, Apple seems to be focussing on window dressing and extensions, and less on major components that need updating or overhaul, like the woeful file system, kludgy Finder, and awkward networking. Losing focus, Apple.

 

Priceless post. 

 

"catching - and surpassing - competing operating systems in core technologies."

 

Uh, what are the operating systems that OSX does not completely decimate in core technologies at this point? Windows? Every single OSX release improves the core technologies- and I'm sure Yosemite does to, even if they haven't mentioned anything. Losing focus? I've been watching Apple a long time, and I've never, ever seen them this focused. Yes, they're doing alot more, but there's a consistent theme in their actions, with a unified goal and a grand plan. If you think Apple doesn't have focus, I'm really curious as to who you believe does- All Microsoft and Google have been doing lately is throwing random shit at the wall with no rhyme or reason. 

post #26 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panu View Post

I joked with an Apple Store employee that Apple uses PCs with Windows in Cupertino. I expected her to laugh dismissively. Instead, she looked worried and said, quietly, "I hope not."

Go to netcraft.com and check apple.com and icloud.com. They are not running on OS X. Army.mil used to run on OS X, but it doesn't any more.

post #27 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post
 

Apple never really managed to penetrate enterprise in a noteworthy way, except for creative professionals.

 

One enterprise that Apple never managed to penetrate is Apple.

post #28 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobodyy View Post
 

 

This has got to be willfully misguided. 

 

As it seems, you are not a developer, you have no had even the slightest crack at the under the hood improvements that exist within Yosemite nor iOS (other than public media) - or how the two OSs relate to each other in terms of development and infrastructure. Yosemite will be a technically solid release, building and expanding on the technologies in the direction Apple established back in 2007 with Lion and new ones with iOS 7 and Mavericks. There might be some new UI, but I guarantee that the team building it isn't working on core technologies - because another team exists solely to tackle those.

 

And you are? I have my copy of Mac OS X and iOS Internals right here, just in case.

 

Apple is losing focus of the core functionalities of its desktop OS. Despite the recent release of the MacPro, OS X continues to be subsumed by iOS in many (every?) way(s). iCloud will replace local storage, eventually, and the Mac will devolve to just another iDevice if these trends continue.

 

I, for one, don't want that to happen.

 

Boiling frog alert.
post #29 of 146
It's interesting that the author is surprised that the UI is inconsistent. We saw the same with last years first few iOS 7 beta's. It's work in progress and before the consumer release we'll see all of these inconsistencies disappear.
post #30 of 146
I'll reserve judgement for my own hands on and later betas. I have a fairly benign attitude about operating systems. As long as the vendor doesn't really screw them up and keeps releasing them for free I expect that much of what they do should fade into the background. I've never been disappointed with any OSX release of recent vintage but I still cannot find it in my heart to forgive Microsoft for what they did with Windows 8. In my opinion Microsoft violated the Hippocratic oath with Windows 8. If Windows 8 were a "hot mess" that would be an improvement over what it turned out to be. Yes, I've tried Windows 8.1 and continue to try to force myself to like it, but I just cannot see it as anything but a step backwards from Windows 7. What's this have to do with OSX? It should serve as as warning to not go overboard with aesthetics and "does good demo" oriented features and UI that destroys utility, functionality, familiarity., and intellectual investment. I shouldn't have the learn how to use a computer, it should learn how to please me. OSX gets most of this relationship correct while Windows 8 continues to abuse me.
post #31 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post

Yes, priceless. 
I forgot how strong the kool-aide is in the forums on this site. I made a few tepid observations that were less than rabid Apple-patriotism, and shazaam, the religion police comes out in full force. Ad hominems are sure to follow.


"I'm sure Yosemite does to, even if they haven't mentioned anything." = religious belief

"... but there's a consistent theme in their actions, with a unified goal and a grand plan" = marketing catchphrases



And you are? I have my copy of Mac OS X and iOS Internals right here, just in case.

Apple is losing focus of the core functionalities of its desktop OS. Despite the recent release of the MacPro, OS X continues to be subsumed by iOS in many (every?) way(s). iCloud will replace local storage, eventually, and the Mac will devolve to just another iDevice if these trends continue.

I, for one, don't want that to happen.

Boiling frog alert.

You complain about non existent ad Hominum attacks, but that is exactly the core content of your post.

In what way is being confident that Apple is continuing to do what they have always been doing (core improvements) a sign of religious fanaticism?

The question still stands: who is doing better than Apple? What OS is better than OSX?
post #32 of 146
Eew
What does the spinning beach ball look like?
 
Where's the new Apple TV?
 
And still waiting for SolipsismX to prove his accusation:
"And yet they haven't loved Google Wallet which you claimed was the exact same thing and kept posting...
Reply
 
Where's the new Apple TV?
 
And still waiting for SolipsismX to prove his accusation:
"And yet they haven't loved Google Wallet which you claimed was the exact same thing and kept posting...
Reply
post #33 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by xgman View Post

So far I see a hot mess. I'm sure that will improve over time, but I really expected this would be a little further along by now.

Remember- iOs7 was basically a beta until five months after release.
I suggest not updating until at least 8.1 or expect endless aggravation.
Edited by pazuzu - 6/3/14 at 9:58am
 
Where's the new Apple TV?
 
And still waiting for SolipsismX to prove his accusation:
"And yet they haven't loved Google Wallet which you claimed was the exact same thing and kept posting...
Reply
 
Where's the new Apple TV?
 
And still waiting for SolipsismX to prove his accusation:
"And yet they haven't loved Google Wallet which you claimed was the exact same thing and kept posting...
Reply
post #34 of 146
I vehemently disagree with the choice of typography on these OS redesigns. This is something that Steve Jobs would NOT have done, but more importantly it's something that's not easy to read, which is why he would not have done it. Ive knows good graphics a mile off, but mistakes text for another graphical element without acknowledging the basic reality that people have to read the stuff.

Lucida Grande was thought about, carefully. Probably the only case of type selection that is similarly high profile over the past decade is the new Federal Highway Administration font, which is similarly extremely legible, even if not necessarily the prettiest from a graphical standpoint, and because of that legibility it is very easy on the eyes. Helvetica Neue is a display font, not a text font -- it's meant for advertising and for graphical effect. It flunks in usability.
post #35 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post
 

And you are? I have my copy of Mac OS X and iOS Internals right here, just in case.

 

Apple is losing focus of the core functionalities of its desktop OS. Despite the recent release of the MacPro, OS X continues to be subsumed by iOS in many (every?) way(s). iCloud will replace local storage, eventually, and the Mac will devolve to just another iDevice if these trends continue. Boiling frog alert.

 

I, for one, don't want that to happen.

 

Yes, I have been a developer for several years and because of that, I can see our major differences in perspective.

 

iCloud replacing local storage is a fantastic example. Is it bad? Will it be good? The future will tell, not the past - but with some of the technologies involving it released just yesterday, I am more than confident to say yes, it will be good and we can get to great. We will get the benefits of iCloud coupled with the benefits of a File System, an archaic interface that I would be overjoyed to leave behind for something superior. ​iCloud will also not replace shit until it shows it is capable of doing that.

But how else are we supposed to work ourselves out of these boxes we created when we didn't have the tools, complexities, and access to the Internet we have today?

 

The Mac will not devolve. It has not devolved, ever. It's changed, trying new things, replacing others that were not complete or satisfactory, but it has in no way devolved - I'm okay with progressive enhancement. Can I do everything I needed to do on a Mac 5 years ago? Yes, and plenty more, and faster. And don't forget that technologies that being developed for iOS are being merged into OS X and vise versa - my favorite being an oldie, Core Animation. Look yourself, there are plenty of Core technologies that started or were created for iOS but have advanced the OS X platform just as far. iOS and OS X are paternal sisters in some respect, only one has a Pixie cut (Cocoa Touch, Mobile UI) while the other has dreads (Cocoa, Desktop UI). (I know this is way simple and pushing, but it creates a nice but accurate mental picture.)

 

I don't think you need to worry.  

post #36 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post
 

Apple seems to be focussing on window dressing and extensions, and less on major components that need updating or overhaul, like the woeful file system, kludgy Finder, and awkward networking.

 

One day (one day) we'll get a new Finder. It's good to see Apple paying attention to window dressings though. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by xgman View Post

So far I see a hot mess.

 

I think the "hot mess" was 10.2 (Jaguar) — 10.4 (Tiger) when Apple kept pinstripes next to brushed metal depending on the app/finder. Took them a while to phase out Aqua pinstripes.

post #37 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Rogers View Post
 

I wish Apple would finally end this Sturm und Drang aesthetic metamorphosis and get on with revamping major parts of the OS. What I keep hoping for is another Leopard- Snow Leopard release cycle, catching - and surpassing - competing operating systems in core technologies. Instead, Apple seems to be focussing on window dressing and extensions, and less on major components that need updating or overhaul, like the woeful file system, kludgy Finder, and awkward networking. Losing focus, Apple.

There are others who share your view on Snow Leopard but I am not sure that Apple is losing focus. Maybe all these changes is a sign of the exact opposite - or rather a sign of re-focussing. A certain amount of chaos always follows order and vice versa, its the inevitable way of growth and development. Remember that the Leopard / Snow Leopard type development has only ever happened once, so to say Apple is loosing its way because its going out on a limb (or several), seems wrong to me. Perhaps after Yosemite there will be a need for a clean-up iteration, but right now its all pretty exciting. 

post #38 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by photoeditor View Post

I vehemently disagree with the choice of typography on these OS redesigns. This is something that Steve Jobs would NOT have done, but more importantly it's something that's not easy to read, which is why he would not have done it. Ive knows good graphics a mile off, but mistakes text for another graphical element without acknowledging the basic reality that people have to read the stuff.

Lucida Grande was thought about, carefully. Probably the only case of type selection that is similarly high profile over the past decade is the new Federal Highway Administration font, which is similarly extremely legible, even if not necessarily the prettiest from a graphical standpoint, and because of that legibility it is very easy on the eyes. Helvetica Neue is a display font, not a text font -- it's meant for advertising and for graphical effect. It flunks in usability.

 

I like Lucida Grande as well, but why do you think Helvetica Neue fails in legibility  and usability? Letterforms? X-heights?

post #39 of 146
Will Spotlight be able to search NAS drives which is seriously missing at the moment?
post #40 of 146

I noticed that all of the apps have lost the double arrows in the upper right corners to take the apps into full-screen mode. Is the interaction of multiple desktops, full-screen apps, and mission control still the same as it has been since (I believe) Lion? How to you take an app like iTunes or Safari or Calendar into full-screen mode?

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