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New settings in iOS 8: Auto-delete texts, camera privacy controls, 'Hey Siri' voice activation

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
Apple's upcoming iOS 8 update will give users better control over their mobile devices, with new customizable settings that address longstanding issues with old text messages, privacy concerns related to camera access, and the convenience of voice-activated Siri controls.




Store Messages



One new setting that some users will find particularly useful is an option to control how long text messages and picture messages are stored on a device. For heavy texters, a backlog of messages can balloon over time and take up a considerable amount of space not only on an iPhone, but also in the form of iCloud backups.

Apple has addressed this in the first iOS 8 beta by including a "Store Messages" option that can be found in the Messages section of the Settings app. Here, users can choose whether messages are saved forever, for 30 days, or for one year.

As of iOS 8 beta 1, the default setting on "Store Messages" is forever.

Camera privacy controls



Upon booting iOS 8 and launching the native Camera application for the first time, developers testing the software will be met with a new prompt asking if they want to allow the Camera app to access the cameras on their iPhone or iPad.

Strangely, the forward and rear facing cameras on the iPhone and iPad were not previously controlled through the Privacy setting in iOS. That's set to change with iOS 8, as the first beta adds a "Camera" section to the Privacy settings.




From there, users will be able to control access for third-party apps that have requested the right to tap into their device's cameras. The Camera setting remains alongside previously existing options such as Contacts, Photos, Microphone, and Motion Activity.

Diagnostics and Usage sharing controls are also included in the first beta. Users can turn off sending diagnostics from the Privacy section, and also view specific data that may have been sent to Apple.

"Hey Siri"



With iOS 8, users won't have to have their iPhone or iPad in their hands to invoke Siri. Instead, the device will listen for the voice prompt "Hey Siri" to initiate.

In order to preserve battery life, Apple requires that the device be plugged into power for "Hey Siri" to work. This stands in contrast to Google's Android search function, which responds to the word "Google" and is always on, regardless of power state.




"Hey Siri" can be enabled in iOS 8 beta 1 by opening the Settings app, choosing General, then Siri, and switching on the "Voice Activation" feature.

Voice activation for Siri works as advertised in the first iOS 8 beta. Saying "Hey Siri" at any point while the iPhone is plugged in, even while the screen is locked and dark, will automatically bring up Siri voice controls.

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post #2 of 42
The fact that 'Hey Siri' only works when plugged in, I imagine that means that the A7 doesn't have a low power DSP that is capable of supporting an 'always listening' function (like f.e. the Snapdragon 800). So it wouldn't be a stretch for the A8 to have a DSP that does support it, so that could mean the iPhone 6 might have an 'always listening' function (but will be iPhone 6 exclusive with the others keeping the plugged in alternative as it would consume too much battery power). Just thinking out loud here but does seem plausible, not?
Edited by Chipsy - 6/3/14 at 9:36am
post #3 of 42
Sounds like a reasonable guess, chipsy, I agree.
post #4 of 42
Why not let USERS decide how to manage the battery? I choose to let my laptop run at full-bore even when on battery because, the way I use it -- short periods of real work -- responsiveness matters more than battery life. If that situation should change I can simply adjust the settings to throttle back performance and brightness to conserve battery power. It's up to me.

Why not offer the same choice on the iPhone? Add a switch so that in addition to ON/OFF users can select "ALWAYS ON" or "BETTER BATTERY LIFE."

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post #5 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

Why not let USERS decide how to manage the battery? I choose to let my laptop run at full-bore even when on battery because, the way I use it -- short periods of real work -- responsiveness matters more than battery life. If that situation should change I can simply adjust the settings to throttle back performance and brightness to conserve battery power. It's up to me.

Why not offer the same choice on the iPhone? Add a switch so that in addition to ON/OFF users can select "ALWAYS ON" or "BETTER BATTERY LIFE."

 

Because...  It's in beta?  Don't make snap judgements until you know what will be in the shipping iOS 8 bits.

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post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

Why not let USERS decide how to manage the battery? I choose to let my laptop run at full-bore even when on battery because, the way I use it -- short periods of real work -- responsiveness matters more than battery life. If that situation should change I can simply adjust the settings to throttle back performance and brightness to conserve battery power. It's up to me.

Why not offer the same choice on the iPhone? Add a switch so that in addition to ON/OFF users can select "ALWAYS ON" or "BETTER BATTERY LIFE."


Most users don't care, don't want to know, or have better things to do than micromanage processes on their phone.  In the end, most people will end up going on boards such as this one and complaining that "My iPhone battery suckz".  That's why.

post #7 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Because...  It's in beta?  Don't make snap judgements until you know what will be in the shipping iOS 8 bits.
I thought they said this would work when plugged into your car?
post #8 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post
 


Most users don't care, don't want to know, or have better things to do than micromanage processes on their phone.  In the end, most people will end up going on boards such as this one and complaining that "My iPhone battery suckz".  That's why.

 

He didn't suggest making always on the default; he suggested making it an option. 

post #9 of 42
Saying "hey, Siri" should be convenient to do in the car when the phone is connected to power and bluetooth.
post #10 of 42
Or, it needs to be plugged in to be screened for "real world" use. If you are at a restaurant and there are 4 iPhones on the table, someone yells "Hey Siri", what do you think will be the result? In the real world, you will use voice to change a song on your phone across the room or to get directions/text while driving. Both examples are usually plugged in.

Not everything is a conspiracy or poor design. Sometimes it's intended.
post #11 of 42
I was just discussing a desire to have iMessages remove messages after a certain date so I didn't have to delete entire conversations off my device. I'm glad to see it's now available.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post

The fact that 'Hey Siri' only works when plugged in, I imagine that means that the A7 doesn't have a low power DSP that is capable of supporting an 'always listening' function (like f.e. the Snapdragon 800). So it wouldn't be a stretch for the A8 to have a DSP that does support it, so that could mean the iPhone 6 might have an 'always listening' function (but will be iPhone 6 exclusive with the others keeping the plugged in alternative as it would consume too much battery power). Just thinking out loud here but does seem plausible, not?

I hope you're proven correct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlor View Post

He didn't suggest making always on the default; he suggested making it an option.

And every option that a user wants should be implemented because that user would know how to reasonably handle it? There would be far to many options in the system for the average user to deal with. That would hurt he user experience more than a feature that doesn't exist now in iOS 7 still not existing in iOS 8.

Quote:
Originally Posted by adhir View Post

Saying "hey, Siri" should be convenient to do in the car when the phone is connected to power and bluetooth.

I'm thinking that was their primary use case for this new feature.

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post #12 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by adhir View Post

Saying "hey, Siri" should be convenient to do in the car when the phone is connected to power and bluetooth.

 

+1
There isn't much use for it when holding the device in normal circumstance.

post #13 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post
 

 

Because...  It's in beta?  Don't make snap judgements until you know what will be in the shipping iOS 8 bits.

 

Isnt SIRI itself still beta or iphone4 users use it now?

post #14 of 42
I had no idea I could use "Siri" hands free now. This is going to be great while driving in the car. I hated having to hold the 'home' button to invoke Siri and always thought, why can't it work at least plugged in hands free. Demo:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5n8Z5BmSSx8
post #15 of 42
melior diabolus quem scies
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post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

And every option that a user wants should be implemented because that user would know how to reasonably handle it?

I don't think it would be too daunting for even the average user if presented as I described it. That said, don't get me wrong -- I am NOT complaining. I'm thrilled to have at least SOME voice activation options! I just want more. More! MORE, DAMMIT! 1smile.gif

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post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I was just discussing a desire to have iMessages remove messages after a certain date so I didn't have to delete entire conversations off my device. I'm glad to see it's now available.

 

It be great if deleting events in the Calendar and also people from Contacts would be made easier as well.  Right now it takes too many strokes in both IOS and OS X just to get rid of them.

post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just_Me View Post

Isnt SIRI itself still beta or iphone4 users use it now?

Siri was never released for iPhone 4 and never will be.
post #19 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I was just discussing a desire to have iMessages remove messages after a certain date so I didn't have to delete entire conversations off my device. I'm glad to see it's now available.
I hope you're proven correct.

I could be mistaken, but I thought those new "expiration" times were only for the video and audio recordings sent within a conversation. I didn't see where an entire conversation would expire and be deleted from Messages.
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by JupiterOne View Post

I could be mistaken, but I thought those new "expiration" times were only for the video and audio recordings sent within a conversation. I didn't see where an entire conversation would expire and be deleted from Messages.

The options are Forever, 1 year, and 30 days. Plus the heading is Store Messages, not Store Message Attachments. I think you might be referring to how an attachment you've sent on your end will disappear from your side of the conversation soon after you sent it.

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post #21 of 42
I wish I could change Siri's name. I'd prefer to say "Hey Kit" or "Hey R2". That would be cool.
post #22 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post

The fact that 'Hey Siri' only works when plugged in, I imagine that means that the A7 doesn't have a low power DSP that is capable of supporting an 'always listening' function (like f.e. the Snapdragon 800). So it wouldn't be a stretch for the A8 to have a DSP that does support it, so that could mean the iPhone 6 might have an 'always listening' function (but will be iPhone 6 exclusive with the others keeping the plugged in alternative as it would consume too much battery power). Just thinking out loud here but does seem plausible, not?

 

Easy fix:  Put your current iPhone in a Mophie or other battery-case that tricks the iPhone into thinking it's charging.  Bam - mobile always listening.

 

Of course, the limitation for plug-in could be to prevent (either intentional or inadvertent) Glasshole syndrome - i.e., it's unlawful to tape someone without their express consent in many jurisdictions.

post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflagel View Post

I wish I could change Siri's name. I'd prefer to say "Hey Kit" or "Hey R2". That would be cool.

Now that "Hey, Siri" is coming they might just allow that because there may be someone's name that sounds too alike which keeps setting it of. If they do implement it I wouldn't think it would come this year. This is the sort of thing I would expect Apple to not proactively anticipate.

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post #24 of 42
it only works when plugged in, ie in the car, at home, at work. and how often do you REALLY hear someone say "Hey ....". Anyway, it was just a thought. "Hey Siri" is so lame.
post #25 of 42
Some people here feel that giving users a choice of making voice activation available on battery or only when plugged in will confuse them. I'd like to counter that what really confuses ME is that some things work all the time and others apparently only work when the phone is plugged in. I don't know which operations fall into the latter category so I don't know when I have to plug in the phone to make them happen. I find THAT difficult and confusing.
 
Of course, I'm only one or two IQ points smarter than your average house plant so maybe I'm not a good example.

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post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

Some people here feel that giving users a choice of making voice activation available on battery or only when plugged in will confuse them. I'd like to counter that what really confuses ME is that some things work all the time and others apparently only work when the phone is plugged in. I don't know which operations fall into the latter category so I don't know when I have to plug in the phone to make them happen. I find THAT difficult and confusing.

Of course, I'm only one or two IQ points smarter than your average house plant so maybe I'm not a good example.

it's the path of least resistance. From Apple's PoV creating something great doesn't stop with it being clever or powerful, but also being understood with little to no effort by pretty much everyone they want as customers. That means they very well may have features they are choosing not to add because they want a feature to become solidified before adding a bunch of knobs and whistles that may affect the experience in a negative way.

You say you want an option, but what if we all got every option we wanted? Imagine how the system would look, especially when Settings is already extremely massive. I can think of a dozen options just for Siri that would be nice for me (and perhaps a few people on this forum) to have but the majority of users simply won't care. "A thousand no's for every yes."

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post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by r00fus View Post

Easy fix:  Put your current iPhone in a Mophie or other battery-case that tricks the iPhone into thinking it's charging.  Bam - mobile always listening.

Of course, the limitation for plug-in could be to prevent (either intentional or inadvertent) Glasshole syndrome - i.e., it's unlawful to tape someone without their express consent in many jurisdictions.
Well that's a clever work around. With regard to consent I doubt that is a problem as it doesn't actually record anything, nor is any data kept/stored anywhere (not even locally). It just waits for a hotword which happens all locally (on the chip). Internet connection is only made after the hot word is detected. So I don't think that consent should pose as a problem.
Edited by Chipsy - 6/3/14 at 3:34pm
post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

And every option that a user wants should be implemented because that user would know how to reasonably handle it? There would be far to many options in the system for the average user to deal with. That would hurt he user experience more than a feature that doesn't exist now in iOS 7 still not existing in iOS 8.

 

I didn't agree with him; I tried to point out that you were mischaracterizing his post. 

 

Jumping straight to "every option that a user wants" is pure hyperbole and has nothing to do with what either of us said.

post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlor View Post

I didn't agree with him; I tried to point out that you were mischaracterizing his post. 

Jumping straight to "every option that a user wants" is pure hyperbole and has nothing to do with what either of us said.

When the comments start off with wanting to let the user decide what options to select without any notion of the scope of allowable desirable options or suggesting that's it's not a big a deal from a coding standpoint to add an option then it's the only viable response. Are you saying "Add what I want but ignore everyone else's wishes? That sound very selfish and myopic.

A constructive method might be to explain why you feel that a particular option might be very popular among most users (i.e.: therefore being more important than others) and would make the UX better. But to just wonder why they can't add your option because you want it isn't consecutive.


PS: I have an innumerable number of things I wish Apple would do. Thankfully they are implementing an amazing number of them with iOS 8 and Mavericks and yet it doesn't even put a dent in my wish list.
Edited by SolipsismX - 6/3/14 at 4:01pm

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post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

The options are Forever, 1 year, and 30 days. Plus the heading is Store Messages, not Store Message Attachments. I think you might be referring to how an attachment you've sent on your end will disappear from your side of the conversation soon after you sent it.
Yes, I'm referring to how the attachment will disappear on the sender's side. Is the Forever, 1 year, 30 days something new in System Settings? I must have missed that part.
post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by JupiterOne View Post

Yes, I'm referring to how the attachment will disappear on the sender's side. Is the Forever, 1 year, 30 days something new in System Settings? I must have missed that part.

It's under Settings » Messages. I don't think it was mentioned on stage.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

Why not let USERS decide how to manage the battery? I choose to let my laptop run at full-bore even when on battery because, the way I use it -- short periods of real work -- responsiveness matters more than battery life. If that situation should change I can simply adjust the settings to throttle back performance and brightness to conserve battery power. It's up to me.

Why not offer the same choice on the iPhone? Add a switch so that in addition to ON/OFF users can select "ALWAYS ON" or "BETTER BATTERY LIFE."

I don't think Apple has any desire to give users the tools to abuse the battery and cause early failure.  The system is very carefully designed to manage the battery itself under a wide range of conditions and use.  Giving you the ability to interfere with that would simply increase warranty claims to Apple for bad batteries.

post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post
 

I don't think Apple has any desire to give users the tools to abuse the battery and cause early failure.  The system is very carefully designed to manage the battery itself under a wide range of conditions and use.  Giving you the ability to interfere with that would simply increase warranty claims to Apple for bad batteries.

 

I don't know if that applies. Draining the battery by having the phone "listen" isn't any different that draining it by watching movies. Consumption is consumption. Besides, they use Li-Ion batteries that are extremely tolerant of abuse.

 

As for the Apple approach, their laptops allow the user to make choices about battery life vs. performance. Why would a phone be any different?

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post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
A constructive method might be to explain why you feel that a particular option might be very popular among most users (i.e.: therefore being more important than others) and would make the UX better.

 

Sorry, I thought the benefit was self-evident. Being able to use a feature all the time is inherently better than only being able to use it under certain conditions. In this case that benefit has a cost -- battery life -- so it's not black-and-white and a choice has to be made. The question is whether it's best for Apple to decide FOR me or let me decide myself.

 

I think the best way to balance those conflicting objectives is to let me decide which is best in my particular circumstances just like I do with my Mac. I think iPhone users may be expected to be roughly as savvy as Mac users, so I don't think giving them a choice of convenience vs. battery life is over-reaching.

 

Further, as I stated before, I think including features that only work under certain circumstances -- like being connected to external power, or only over wifi but not cellular -- is actually MORE confusing than letting me decide for myself how best to manage my power consumption.

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post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

Draining the battery by having the phone "listen" isn't any different that draining it by watching movies.

The battery draining quickly while you're actively engaging with it is very different from the battery draining quickly hen it's in your pocket, purse, or desk drawer while you're not using.
Quote:
Consumption is consumption.

What?! Making a 5 minute call is NOT the same as watching a 5 minute 1080p video

Quote:
Besides, they use Li-Ion batteries that are extremely tolerant of abuse.

We're not talking about abuse; we're talking about usage.
Quote:
As for the Apple approach, their laptops allow the user to make choices about battery life vs. performance. Why would a phone be any different?

Seriously?!?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

Being able to use a feature all the time is inherently better than only being able to use it under certain conditions.

Oh, I agree 100%, but you're ignoring that there is no ALL THE TIME with device that doesn't have an infinite power source built-in so there is no "inherently better" since the iPhone doesn't have an infinite battery life.

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post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
The battery draining quickly while you're actively engaging with it is very different from the battery draining quickly hen it's in your pocket, purse, or desk drawer while you're not using.

 

Context, my friend. I was responding to a comment about Apple's obligations with respect to ruined batteries. From that perspective the activity (or lack of it) is irrelevant.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
What?! Making a 5 minute call is NOT the same as watching a 5 minute 1080p video

 

Again context. See above. Same discussion. The expressed concern was that letting users choose to burn up the battery more quickly would result in ruined battery issues for Apple. I'm saying that using up the battery by letting Siri "listen" isn't any different than using it up by watching videos. One is no more or less likely to ruin a battery than the other.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
We're not talking about abuse; we're talking about usage.

 

No, the comments you're quoting here were made in response to a post about battery failure, not usage.

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
Quote:
As for the Apple approach, their laptops allow the user to make choices about battery life vs. performance. Why would a phone be any different?

Seriously?!?!

 

I think so, unless I'm missing something. Why is giving me control over battery management reasonable on my laptop but not my phone?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
you're ignoring that there is no ALL THE TIME with device that doesn't have an infinite power source built-in so there is no "inherently better" since the iPhone doesn't have an infinite battery life.

 

Damn you're picky about wording! :) You're right that I presented my argument poorly, but I still contend that the essence of my point is valid. That is: I think it would make more sense for Apple to let ME decide which is more important -- battery life or convenience -- instead of deciding for me. Why? Because we don't all use our devices the same way. Which is more important will vary from person to person and day to day. I never come close to killing my battery, and the time my phone spends plugged in is when I'm not using it. For me and others like me, having Siri listen is a benefit. Longer battery life is not, because we already have more than we need. If it turns out that listening is resulting in the battery going dead before I get home I can always just turn it off during the times I'll be away from power that long and turn it back on when I won't.

 

Apple has demonstrated with other products that power management is an area users are quite capable of understanding. I think it would be reasonable to include it in iOS. YMMV.

 

Lest I give the wrong impression, this not something about which I care deeply or am upset. I just disagree with your position that it's a serious issue for Apple to loosen up that particular rein. I think it would work out fine, and be BETTER for users, not worse.

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post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

I think it would work out fine, and be BETTER for users, not worse.

It sounds like it would be better for you and I'm sure you can get a handful of people to support your position just as you could have gotten many to say that Apple should offer the 1st gen LTE chip in the iPhone 3GS with a 2 hour data usage time, but that has no barring on Apple's PoV. What you're asking for sounds like it would currently be fine for you but end up hurting a large portion of their customer base who don't understand the nuances of what different electronic components and SW need to run on a system constantly. This is an ever present issue and every day I hear people attributing cause and effect improperly because they don't understand what's at play. Did you know you can describe lossless v lossy to someone and they might then encode their CD collection of audiobooks as lossless. Do you know how large a file a 20 hour audiobook takes up?

If you want an example of the Wild Wild West of smartphone platforms check out Android. You can do pretty much anything you want and you'll use more power per minute than on an iPhone. That's simply not want Apple offers which is why I can recommend them to family and friends. I do enough troubleshooting for friends and family as it is.

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post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sflagel View Post

I wish I could change Siri's name. I'd prefer to say "Hey Kit" or "Hey R2". That would be cool.

Now that "Hey, Siri" is coming they might just allow that because there may be someone's name that sounds too alike which keeps setting it of. If they do implement it I wouldn't think it would come this year. This is the sort of thing I would expect Apple to not proactively anticipate.

I'd like it if you didn't have to say 'Hey.' I know you Americans regard that as normal, but it's a bit rude for us Brits. 'Excuse me, Siri' or just 'Siri' would suffice.
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post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

I'd like it if you didn't have to say 'Hey.' I know you Americans regard that as normal, but it's a bit rude for us Brits. 'Excuse me, Siri' or just 'Siri' would suffice.

Apple does have a long history of at least trying to optimize for different languages and cultures so perhaps that will be an option.

I'd certainly like to see "Wotcha, Siri" be adopted. 1biggrin.gif Maybe Siri can have a Chav setting and reply like Vicky Pollard.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #40 of 42

It would be handy to have a way of dumping out the messages in a text file or email (as WhatsApp allows) if the auto-delete is enabled. It would make searching back through them easier too.

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  • New settings in iOS 8: Auto-delete texts, camera privacy controls, 'Hey Siri' voice activation
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