or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Netflix HTML5 streaming now available in Safari on OS X Yosemite
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Netflix HTML5 streaming now available in Safari on OS X Yosemite

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 
Following its public unveiling at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference, Netflix on Tuesday officially invited beta users of OS X Yosemite to try out the streaming service's new plugin-free option for watching television shows and movies in Safari.




Registered Mac developers and those with early access to Yosemite via Apple's new public beta program can try out the HTML5-based feature simply by logging in to their Netflix account. Viewers were previously required to use plugins like Microsoft's Silverlight for a number of reasons, including digital rights management and adaptive streaming.

"Congratulations to the Apple team for advancing premium video on the web with Yosemite! We're looking forward to the Yosemite launch this Fall," Netflix engineering executives Anthony Park and Mark Watson wrote in a blog post announcing the move.

The new streaming options are made possible thanks to the adoption of a number of new web standards in the upcoming Safari release.

Media Source Extensions allow web developers to create playback streams in the browser using JavaScript, which enables the addition of features like adaptive streaming -- adjusting the delivery of a video stream based on the way the recipient's network is functioning -- in the browser without plugins. According to Apple, moving this functionality from a plugin to the operating system could allow a MacBook Air to get an additional two hours of battery life when watching streaming video.

Encrypted Media Extensions and WebCrypto, meanwhile, address concerns about digital rights management. They allow end-to-end encryption of the media stream between the browser and Netflix's servers to prevent users from simply capturing video as it comes in.
post #2 of 47
Glad at least Apple (if noone else) is pushing away from plugins and advancing the web.
post #3 of 47
Seems cool - shame I don't use Netflix.

Would be interesting to hear from those who do just how well this works...
post #4 of 47
I was never quite sure why I had to download and install Silverlight on my Mac to make Netflix work, but never did on my iPhone or iPad. Not a big deal, just thought it odd that one required it and the other 2 did not.
post #5 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Glad at least Apple (if noone else) is pushing away from plugins and advancing the web.


The HTML5 player already works in IE11 on Windows...  Just say'n.

post #6 of 47

As usual, thank Apple for laying the groundwork for more compatible protocols that benefit everyone and especially for ignoring all the whiny Flash-fanboys (i.e. Phandroids) and their crying of how Apple is ruining the web experience.

Funny... you don't hear much from that camp about this anymore eh?  Guess they learned to keep their mouths shut for a change.

post #7 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post
 

As usual, thank Apple for laying the groundwork for more compatible protocols that benefit everyone and especially for ignoring all the whiny Flash-fanboys (i.e. Phandroids) and their crying of how Apple is ruining the web experience.

Funny... you don't hear much from that camp about this anymore eh?  Guess they learned to keep their mouths shut for a change.

 

Interesting - Apple laying the groundwork?  The HTML5 player already works on Windows in IE11 - you know, an already released product...  I mean Apple is cool and all - but...  wow!

post #8 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbi View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Glad at least Apple (if noone else) is pushing away from plugins and advancing the web.


The HTML5 player already works in IE11 on Windows...  Just say'n.

 

That's great for anyone foolish enough to run an insecure browser like IE.

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

Reply

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

Reply
post #9 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbi View Post
 

 

Interesting - Apple laying the groundwork?  The HTML5 player already works on Windows in IE11 - you know, an already released product...  I mean Apple is cool and all - but...  wow!

Just say'n, I'm pretty sure both the posts you replied to are referring to Apple's no plugin push in Safari generally - not just about Netflix streaming.  If you don't think Apple is advancing the state of web browsers & web technologies, well, that's cool, but I am reasonably sure that HTML 5 video would be practically non-existent without Apple's incessant push forward (think Google, think Flash.

post #10 of 47
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

That's great for anyone foolish enough to run an insecure browser like IE.

 

Do they call it IE because that’s what you groan when you inevitably run into one of the many exploits for it?

 

“AIEEEEE!”

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #11 of 47

wow, people still using Safari... you have to give credit to the power of preloaded software.

post #12 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by freqsound View Post

I was never quite sure why I had to download and install Silverlight on my Mac to make Netflix work, but never did on my iPhone or iPad. Not a big deal, just thought it odd that one required it and the other 2 did not.

On the Mac you play Netflix in the browser but on iOS device you play Netflix in their dedicated app which you did download. Netflix could have also prevented you from having to install Silverlight by creating a Mac app but already had the browser support before iOS apps were commonplace.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #13 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by agramonte View Post

wow, people still using Safari... you have to give credit to the power of preloaded software.

Why are you surprised?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #14 of 47
Originally Posted by agramonte View Post
wow, people still using Safari... you have to give credit to the power of preloaded software.

 

Take your trolling and shove it so far in your ear that your otolaryngologist can afford a house in the Hamptons.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #15 of 47
Microsoft is actually the company that largely created the MSE technology. So it isn't a surprise that IE supports it.

Google Chrome was also an early adopter of MSE.

Apple would be last with support for MSE if it weren't for Firefox.

Apple is neither at the forefront nor laying the groundwork.
post #16 of 47

Google was such a diehard Flashtard.  They just kept pushing Flash for all it was worth because they thought they had some huge advantage over iOS and Steve Jobs insistence that it should be killed off.  Flash ran like crap on mobile devices but Google simply wouldn't relent.  It took all the way to KitKat for Android to absolutely not support Adobe Flash and yet there are still people trying to install it and succeeding by side-loading it.  Some people just never give up.

post #17 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbi View Post


The HTML5 player already works in IE11 on Windows...  Just say'n.

How efficient is it ? Silverlight was MS's product and it sucks a lot of juice for doing the same thing.
post #18 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post


How efficient is it ? Silverlight was MS's product and it sucks a lot of juice for doing the same thing.


From a play back perspective - it definitely feels better than the Silverlight player.  Quicker to load, smother playback, etc.  But, that might just be a perception thing - it's not like I have done any formal benchmarks or anything :)

post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by shpshftr View Post

Microsoft is actually the company that largely created the MSE technology. So it isn't a surprise that IE supports it.

Google Chrome was also an early adopter of MSE.

Apple would be last with support for MSE if it weren't for Firefox.

Apple is neither at the forefront nor laying the groundwork.

Apple supports HTTP Live Streaming in HTML5 video tag, which is smarter than MSE, EME and WebCrypto because it runs natively, and are aware of the client's h/w runtime.

What the MSE stack adds is giving more control to the streaming providers. They will have to recreate the entire HLS adaptive streaming logic using JavaScript.

The providers can tweak their JS code to address their customers' nuances without Apple's help.
Edited by patsu - 6/3/14 at 2:21pm
post #20 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Encrypted Media Extensions and WebCrypto, meanwhile, address concerns about digital rights management. They allow end-to-end encryption of the media stream between the browser and Netflix's servers to prevent users from simply capturing video as it comes in.

Finally, 7 years after the original iPhone. These things should have been implemented years ago so nobody would have any excuses to use Flash or Silverlight for DRM video.
post #21 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbi View Post
 


The HTML5 player already works in IE11 on Windows...  Just say'n.

 

Curious about this, I fired up IE 11 on my Windows 7 VM and was immediately prompted to install Silverlight.  A bit of Googling, and learned that Netflix supports the HTML5 player on IE11 on Windows 8.1 ONLY.

 

So, sure, it works in the Windows OS that has barely 5% of the Windows market... Just say'n.


Edited by _Rick_V_ - 6/3/14 at 6:17pm
post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Take your trolling and shove it so far in your ear that your otolaryngologist can afford a house in the Hamptons.

I've been using Apple products since the Apple II. I'm not a troll and I will call it like it is.

Safari is bleh...Chrome is way better.

In IOS 8 will we be able to set Chrome or other browser as a default? Safari is bleh on iOS also. Worse, even.
post #23 of 47

Chrome is designed to monetize you, I have no idea why any intelligent person would use it. Especially since Firefox has a superior add-on base to draw from.

 

Safari is also fine, though 6 runs slow on my older hardware.

 

At least we're finally getting to where Jobs said the web needed to go. Just took a lot longer than it should have.

post #24 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post

Chrome is designed to monetize you, I have no idea why any intelligent person would use it. Especially since Firefox has a superior add-on base to draw from.

Safari is also fine, though 6 runs slow on my older hardware.

At least we're finally getting to where Jobs said the web needed to go. Just took a lot longer than it should have.

1) I think that argument is as bad as people saying that you shouldn't buy from Apple because they make a profit off your purchase, instead you should buy from a company that can't figure out how to profit from you. I have no problem with a company wanting to profit. My interest in a profit is purely about the value to me. If it's the best product for my needs then I'll use it.

2) Apple's creation of Safari definitely gives them revenue and profit, albeit in a mostly indirect way. Their investment in all things is to make money from us at some point. They also make money on us whenever we use a search engine in the Safari URL.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #25 of 47

I would rather pay up front for the hardware and not have a company tracking everything I do to sell me ads.

post #26 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Do they call it IE because that’s what you groan when you inevitably run into one of the many exploits for it?

“AIEEEEE!”

lol.gif now that's funny
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #27 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


1) I think that argument is as bad as people saying that you shouldn't buy from Apple because they make a profit off your purchase, instead you should buy from a company that can't figure out how to profit from you. I have no problem with a company wanting to profit. My interest in a profit is purely about the value to me. If it's the best product for my needs then I'll use it.

2) Apple's creation of Safari definitely gives them revenue and profit, albeit in a mostly indirect way. Their investment in all things is to make money from us at some point. They also make money on us whenever we use a search engine in the Safari URL.

 

in broad general terms, I agree with you–– a company is certainly entitled to a profit.  

 

However, the way Google monetizes from us is not by a straightforward transaction, but from insidiously and relentlessly collecting data on us, our surfing habits, and so on.  If you’re comfortable with that… well…

post #28 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post

I would rather pay up front for the hardware and not have a company tracking everything I do to sell me ads.

1) And that's a perfectly reasonable choice but my point against your comment is that all companies are trying to make money from you.

2) What search engine, if any do you use? Do block all ads on AI, tool, since ads are how they make their money?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #29 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Rick_V_ View Post

Curious about this, I fired up IE 11 on my Windows 7 VM and was immediately prompted to install Silverlight.  A bit of Googling, and learned that Netflix supports the HTML5 player on IE11 on Windows 8.1 ONLY.

So, sure, it works in the Windows OS that has barely 5% of the Windows market... Just say'n.

And how did it work with Yosemite? Oh wait you don't have it yet. 5% doesn’t sound like much but it's still 5% more than 0%.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #30 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

And how did it work with Yosemite? Oh wait you don't have it yet. 5% doesn’t sound like much but it's still 5% more than 0%.

I wonder how many active users that is.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I wonder how many active users that is.


Netmarketshare has Windows 8.1 6.35% overall market share.  So, about the same installed base of all versions of OSX combined...

 

You figure it out.   

post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbi View Post

You figure it out.

Thanks for nothing.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


Finally, 7 years after the original iPhone. These things should have been implemented years ago so nobody would have any excuses to use Flash or Silverlight for DRM video.

Maybe someone could clarify this, but don't encrypted media extensions essentially replace a single universal plugin (Flash) with multiple site-specific and possibly browser-specific plugins? How are things any simpler for the user this way?


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 6/3/14 at 9:43pm
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Rick_V_ View Post

Curious about this, I fired up IE 11 on my Windows 7 VM and was immediately prompted to install Silverlight.  A bit of Googling, and learned that Netflix supports the HTML5 player on IE11 on Windows 8.1 ONLY.

So, sure, it works in the Windows OS that has barely 5% of the Windows market... Just say'n.
5% of the OS that has ~90% overall share is still a sizeable portion, comparable to all the Macs that run Mavericks.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbi View Post
 


Netmarketshare has Windows 8.1 6.35% overall market share.  So, about the same installed base of all versions of OSX combined...

 

You figure it out.   

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post


5% of the OS that has ~90% overall share is still a sizeable portion, comparable to all the Macs that run Mavericks.

 

 

The point being was, saying "Netflix already works in IE 11!" is disingenuous.

 

If that were true, then it implies that Netflix already works with over 60% of the internet population TODAY.  Instead, Netflix is only working for 5~6% of internet users.  Big difference. 

 

It would've been more accurate to say that Netflix is already working in Windows 8.1 today, not IE 11.

post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post
 

Maybe someone could clarify this, but don't encrypted media extensions essentially replace a single universal plugin (Flash) with multiple site-specific and possibly browser-specific plugins? How are things any simpler for the user this way?

 

Yes, that's exactly right-- encrypted media extensions essentially replace Flash (and Silverlight).  And yes it is simpler.

 

  1. For starters, everything you need will already be baked into the browser. No more having to separately download a plugin.

 

  2. It also means that we no longer have to rely on Flash and Silverlight. Both of which needlessly slow down your browser, cause fans to kick in, and drain the battery faster than necessary.  There's a reason why Flash isn't on mobile platforms, you know.

 

  3. Finally, we're safer without plugins like Flash, Silverlight, and Java.  Flash and Java are both actively targeted as exploit vectors by malware.  And Silverlight has recently popped up on the radar for malware as well (see http://arstechnica.com/security/2014/05/move-over-java-drive-by-attacks-exploiting-microsoft-silverlight-on-the-rise/).  Also, plugins are generally more difficult for ordinary users to keep updated, leaving them even more vulnerable with old versions installed.


Edited by _Rick_V_ - 6/4/14 at 7:20am
post #37 of 47
Originally Posted by pfisher View Post
I've been using Apple products since the Apple II.

 

No one cares. This doesn’t matter.

 
I’m not a troll and I will call it like it is. Safari is bleh...Chrome is way better.

 

So does “like it is” now mean “completely wrong”? Not sure how you think you can say this when everyone knows otherwise.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Rick_V_ View Post
 

 

The point being was, saying "Netflix already works in IE 11!" is disingenuous.

 

 

 "Incorrect" would have sufficed, since you don't actually know that the original post was knowingly withholding facts.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

"Incorrect" would have sufficed, since you don't actually know that the original post was knowingly withholding facts.

It's not technically incorrect which makes disingenuous an apt word if the original statement was purposely obfuscating the fact that it's not every version of Windows running IE11. Now if the OP was simply misinformed then I would say that the statement is simply incomplete as stated.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

 

 

 "Incorrect" would have sufficed, since you don't actually know that the original post was knowingly withholding facts.

 

Nope, I meant the word disingenuous.

 

Had the original poster said something like "but it's already working in IE!", I might've assumed (due to his ignorance) that something else is at play-- that he had Windows 8.1, or perhaps is computer came pre-loaded with Silverlight and he was not aware of it.  But instead, he authoritatively proclaimed that Netflix works in IE 11, implying all platforms.  It was a rather trollish post to begin with, I'm pretty sure he was knowingly withholding facts.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mac OS X
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Netflix HTML5 streaming now available in Safari on OS X Yosemite