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Rogers Wireless becomes second carrier to confirm iOS 8 Wi-Fi calling support

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Although Apple didn't have time to discuss iOS 8's Wi-Fi calling capabilities at Monday's Worldwdie Developers Conference, carriers supporting the service -- like Canadian provider Rogers -- have been quite vocal about the upcoming operating system's new capability.



One day after WWDC kicked off with a jam packed two-hour keynote presentation full of announcements and surprises, Rogers Wireless told iPhone in Canada that its network will support the new Wi-Fi calling feature to be introduced in iOS 8 later this fall.

We'll support the iOS 8 Wi-Fi calling feature when it becomes available in Canada. In the meantime, Rogers customers using the Rogers One Number service on their computer, tablet or smartphone can already make calls over Wi-Fi. They can video chat with other Rogers One Number users or call any Canadian number for free, no matter where they are.


Canada has been included in Apple's day-one rollouts for most every product in recent memory, usually being lumped in with America. Exceptions to the rule include content services, the most recent example being iTunes Radio. With a major release like iOS, however, Canada is expected to be in the launch group.

As noted by the publication, Canadians face roaming charges when traveling to the U.S., meaning iOS 8's new Wi-Fi calling feature could be a boon for both customers and wireless operators.

So far only one U.S. carrier has confirmed compatibility with its network. T-Mobile issued a statement on Monday saying it would offer support for Apple's iOS 8 Wi-Fi calling solution when the operating system launches.
post #2 of 23
great, I think that makes two counting T-Mobile.
post #3 of 23
I was under the impression it doesn't need carrier support, the Mac just makes the call via Ethernet/wifi to the iPhone which actually connects over the cellular network and places the call. It's VoIP to iPhone, then standard GSM/3/4G onwards.
post #4 of 23
I do not understand why carriers need to support wifi calling. they're support is not needed to support VoIP (like Skype) and why would they have to support a mac connecting with an iPhone to make a normal call?
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflagel View Post

I do not understand why carriers need to support wifi calling. they're support is not needed to support VoIP (like Skype) and why would they have to support a mac connecting with an iPhone to make a normal call?


That's not what Wi-Fi calling is...  Wi-Fi calling is a feature on T-Mobile (currently only supported by android and windows phone), that will use your wi-fi connection to make calls when your cellular connection is weak.

post #6 of 23
ah. peculiar. most if the time, the wifi connection is worse than the cellular connection. No public wifi connections, in my experience, are good enough to support VoIP. Do calls switch automatically mid-use, or does the phone chose the better signal when starting the call?
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflagel View Post

ah. peculiar. most if the time, the wifi connection is worse than the cellular connection. No public wifi connections, in my experience, are good enough to support VoIP. Do calls switch automatically mid-use, or does the phone chose the better signal when starting the call?


I don't believe the calls switch dynamically.  It's basically, some options on which to prefer based on signal strength at the time of the call.  The options to prefer Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi only, state you have to stay with in Wi-Fi range during the call.  I set mine to prefer cellular...

post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elijahg View Post

I was under the impression it doesn't need carrier support, the Mac just makes the call via Ethernet/wifi to the iPhone which actually connects over the cellular network and places the call. It's VoIP to iPhone, then standard GSM/3/4G onwards.
It may be required to allow the cellular converted threw wifi.
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflagel View Post

I do not understand why carriers need to support wifi calling. their support is not needed to support VoIP (like Skype) and why would they have to support a mac connecting with an iPhone to make a normal call?

Obviously carrier support is not needed to do VoIP over WiFi, but what TMo and Rogers offer is their own VoIP over WiFi seamlessly integrated with the cellular calling feature. You don't need to use a separate app for dialing like you would with Skype, just dial normally and the phone will pick the best network to make the call. Also, it will use your cell number. Up until now the feature was only supported on a very limited number of phones.

post #10 of 23
I'm guessing the telcos need to enable something at their end for your phone number to become available to wi-fi networks.
post #11 of 23

Hopefully this won't be a feature carriers will charge extra for like AT&T and personal hot spot. 

post #12 of 23
I don't see why wi-fi calling wouldn't be supported by all carriers. It doesn't cost them anything. Now the automatic hotspot I can see being an issue...
post #13 of 23
I've been wifi calling on AT&T for a while with my google number and gvoice app... :-)
post #14 of 23
Does WiFi calling support incoming calls?

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post #15 of 23
Don't confuse this with Handoff.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

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post #16 of 23
@jd_in_sb
I am able to receive calls via google voice number... You'll need to allow the app to send you notifications. Not sure about IOS wifi calling feature; however, I am sure it will. Hopefully, IOS 8 wifi calling will use your main mobile number... If not, google voice works fine and you can even set it up to ring you in our main mobile number. :-)
post #17 of 23

As a Rogers customer, I've used their One Number service for a couple of years. For the Mac, there's a menubar application with a counterpart web app that runs the service. You can make and receive phone calls, send and receive text messages, and view past text messages through the service. It works just like a phone, with no added latency. It doesn't use the phone itself, it's an internet-based service, and yes, it counts against daytime minutes, since ultimately the call is routed through their network.

post #18 of 23

It's ironic that this would be a new feature, since 4G/LTE connections are quite often faster than many Wifi networks. But with the vast explosion of Wifi networks, why not take advantage of them, eh? Just wondering about privacy. Can the calls be intercepted with a man-in-the-middle attack?

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elijahg View Post

I was under the impression it doesn't need carrier support, the Mac just makes the call via Ethernet/wifi to the iPhone which actually connects over the cellular network and places the call. It's VoIP to iPhone, then standard GSM/3/4G onwards.

It probably needs carrier support to CALL OTHER PHONES. Kinda like how the iMessage works in principle already, the fallback is to establish a call over GSM/UMTS/VoLTE. But the connection setup is likely something to the tune of:
Terminating device -> WiFi-> Carrier -> POTS <- Carrier <- Terminating device.

It's literately an extra step. The Rogers One already does the above. Also carriers have had similar services before to save your minutes using UMA before (mostly blackberry devices) so we will have to wait and see if this is any more effective.

You have to remember that the Rogers One/TMo software is just a VoIP app that acts as an "extension" to your mobile device. When the number rings, it rings every device the Rogers One number is logged in with as well as the mobile device.
post #20 of 23
There are tons of buildings and canyon locations with horrible LTE/xG coverage but great WiFi. Think of this in relationship to hospital basements, homes and businesses along PCH, the canyons in the Santa Monica Mountains, Malibu and portions of many big city office buildings
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SailorPaul View Post

There are tons of buildings and canyon locations with horrible LTE/xG coverage but great WiFi. Think of this in relationship to hospital basements, homes and businesses along PCH, the canyons in the Santa Monica Mountains, Malibu and portions of many big city office buildings

 

Yes...I support a school building out in the sticks that doesn't have cell service in that area for any carrier. When I had my android phone on T-Mobile, I could use wifi calling as T-Mobile supported it. This would be great to see happen with Verizon as that building does have WiFi coverage in the computer lab (1Gbps fiber connection too). 

post #22 of 23
@sflagel Not the case at all in Brooklyn. Cell access is almost universally horrible; home, office and cafe wifi are all better options.

And voice-over-IP tends to be of massively better quality than cellular audio anyway; the telcos haven't had much incentive to fix that problem.
post #23 of 23
So, what about AT&T?!? *rolls eyes*
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