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Apple's top secret Swift language grew from work to sustain Objective C, which it now aims to... - Page 3

post #81 of 89
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
Is that possible?

 

They appropriated WebKit pretty quickly. Yes, that was freely available, but good ol’ Microsoft was able to reverse engineer before, and if they can do it, Google can!

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #82 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

They appropriated WebKit pretty quickly. Yes, that was freely available, but good ol’ Microsoft was able to reverse engineer before, and if they can do it, Google can!

But WebKit is open source and uses HTML, CSS, and JS standards. Swift is specifically to make Apple's developer spend less time and money to develop apps that will strengthen its platform.

If Google really wanted to copy Apple they wouldn't be using Java and they wouldn't have such a shitty IDE and documentation.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #83 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

They appropriated WebKit pretty quickly. Yes, that was freely available, but good ol’ Microsoft was able to reverse engineer before, and if they can do it, Google can!

Didn't WebKit turn into a consortium effort after its initial inception by Apple?
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #84 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post
 

Xcode 4:

NSArray *names = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects: @"Tom", @"Dick", @"Harry", nil];

 

Xcode 5:

NSArray *names = @[@"Tom", @"Dick", @"Harry"];

 

Swift:

let names = ["Tom", "Dick", "Harry"]

Does that mean the end of BLOATWARE?

Shut up and go away, you useless, pathetic FUDmonger - Tallest Skil
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Shut up and go away, you useless, pathetic FUDmonger - Tallest Skil
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post #85 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by hentaiboy View Post

Does that mean the end of BLOATWARE?

From what I understand all that code will get compiled the same.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #86 of 89
It's Go (Google) vs Apple (Swift) - Where's the referee? It's a steel cage match!
post #87 of 89
Just what Apple needs, another odd-ball language. Next they should come up with a replacement for English, so that people that want to use Siri can communicate more effectively, in an intuitive, interactive and fun way.
post #88 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I'm a little surprised no one has mentioned the legal advantages this code switch is going to give Apple. Now, no company will be able to claim code theft or infringement in their software. Swift will enable the creation of code that may perform nearly identical functions, but the underlying code could be significantly different.

 

I actually don't quite understand this one. As far as I am aware there are two issues that might be claimed with one being copyright infringement in the case of code theft and the other being patent infringement if a company runs afoul of a patented feature regardless of whether the code itself is original. Code theft could be either a case of downloading company property to personal devices or hacking it via a disassembler, which granted can be useful for trying to figure out the encoding of pesky digital camera raw formats:D. In the case of disassembly, which isn't exact, it could still be regarded as code theft even though the rewritten version would not necessarily match the original. Beyond that Objective-C was different in a lot of ways from either C++ or C, even though it's a strict superset of C. The typical methods and common data types are different. I'm curious how something could be code theft there yet not here.

post #89 of 89

I read whole article. Very well explained. Thanks to Chris Lattner who developed new programming LLVM(low level virtual machine) language which is based on objective C language. We are excited about your offer “course on developing swift “. Thanks for article.

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