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Lightning headphones could allow Apple to make slimmer iPhones by ditching 3.5mm headphone jack - Page 3

post #81 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post
 

 

And how many of the Golden Ear audiophiles of the world are listening to their reference recordings on iPhones?

Or any other highly miniaturized electronics, for that matter?

Let's put this discussion into perspective and say Golden Ear audiophiles are probably 0.01% of the population.

 

Listening with headphones plugged into an iDevice's headphone jack? Probably none. The first thing any audiophile does is bemoan the quality of on-board DACs in portable consumer electronics. If they do use headphones, they are using an external DAC/headphone amp which would be fed digital audio via the Dock or Lightning connection.

 

It appears there are some workarounds to play back high-resolution FLAC files via third-party iOS apps (again to an external DAC), but it's apparently pretty awkward. I'm pretty sure the maximum that iDevices currently support are 48kHz/24-bit audio. I've tried copying 96kHz/24-bit audio files (Apple Lossless) to my trusty iPod classic, but iTunes always says the files are incompatible. They play fine on my Mac.

 

Most of the audiophile guys don't like miniaturized electronics anyhow, arguing that the close confines increases signal noise, heat, cooties, whatever. They prefer big spacious designs with lots of isolation/space between components.

post #82 of 203

This makes no sense to me, but more power to them.  I'm sure they know what they're doing and what their customers want more then I do.  I'd prefer a phone with a few extra mm of thickness and wider compatibility instead of a slightly thinner phone that would require new hardware (new headphones or an adapter).  It sounds like a solution in search of a problem.  The reasoning of allowing for a few extra mm of thinness makes it sound like Apple is chasing a spec war.  Historically Apple doesn't like their customers to focus on spec sheets. 

post #83 of 203

Bad idea. It would instantly render iPhones incompatible with all existing analog headphones. I use a set of Grado headphones with my iOS devices and would not want to trade it in for a limited selection of Lightning-compatible cans.

 

I get the temptation to offload not only the headphone jack, but the internal digital-to-analog audio converter and op-amp as well. In order to restore compatibility, a Lightning-to-3.5mm jack adapter would be needed. But, if the 30-pin adapters provide any indication, these headphone adapters would be bulky and pricey -- primarily because Lightning is a digital-only format and requires a separate DAC built into any analog audio connector. 

 

And the full length of the 3.5mm jack would now be external to the device. Picture a wafer-thin iPhone with this awkward dongle poking off the bottom for anyone who wants to use an analog headset. Not exactly the elegance that Apple purportedly aims for.

post #84 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScartArt View Post
 

If you are an audiophile the last thing you want is to listen through the crappy D/A converter and amp inside the iPhone. Much better to have the digital stream come out of the lightening connector and go to an external headphone DAC and amplifier.

You sure about that? According to these measurements, the digital-to-analog audio chain used on the iPhone 5 performs better than most dedicated headphone amps. If the earlier post about Apple going with Wolfson DACs on the iPhone is true, then that would explain why, since Wolfson DACs are more often found in high end audio components.

 

http://www.kenrockwell.com/apple/iphone-5/audio-quality.htm

 

Quote:
Confirming what I hear with critical listening, the iPhone 5 is a wonderful high-fidelity audio source. While publications funded mostly by advertisements from makers of expensive cables, power conditioners and outboard DACs don't want you to know this, the iPhone 5 is a better audio source than most DACs will be when connected to a computer or CD transport. The only difference is that the iPhone has a level 6 dB lower than a proper CD player, but the iPhone still has more output at 1 V full-scale than some outboard audiophile DACs!

 

Quote:
Ignore those who confuse the iPhone with crappy MP3 players; the iPhone has wonderful audio quality for serious music listening either directly with good or great headphones or plugged into the rest of your high fidelity system.
post #85 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by launfall View Post

Bad idea and not feasible. Lightening is still too expensive, many people have incompatible headphones they paid a lot of money for, Lightening has gained virtually no traction in the marketplace, the plugs fall out at the slightest jarring...I could go on and on. This is one of those "upgrades" Apple should not try to cram down our throats.

 

But would it be enough for you to quit the platform? That’s all that matters. Lots of money to be made selling an adapter for $19. If the European Union gets its way with standardizing on Micro (or is it Mini) USB for charging mobile devices then there’ll have to be an adapter for that too. 

 

What in the hell do you mean by saying Lightening has no traction in the marketplace? All iOS devices use it now. It’s an Apple proprietary connector. If you have an iOS device you will need a Lightening cable, period. And the Lightening audio will be digital and capable of a lot more than just two channel analog, low resolution sound. How about simulated, or real DD 5.1 on future Lightening headphones?

post #86 of 203
It seems an odd direction to me. Won't that preclude charging the phone while you are listening to it unless Apple is planning on implementing wireless induction charging. Won't this mean a pass through charging dongle or something similar?
post #87 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScartArt View Post

If you are an audiophile the last thing you want is to listen through the crappy D/A converter and amp inside the iPhone. Much better to have the digital stream come out of the lightening connector and go to an external headphone DAC and amplifier.

"Crappy"? Who makes the most popular portable music player?

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post #88 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woochifer View Post
 

Bad idea. It would instantly render iPhones incompatible with all existing analog headphones. I use a set of Grado headphones with my iOS devices and would not want to trade it in for a limited selection of Lightning-compatible cans.

 

I get the temptation to offload not only the headphone jack, but the internal digital-to-analog audio converter and op-amp as well. In order to restore compatibility, a Lightning-to-3.5mm jack adapter would be needed. But, if the 30-pin adapters provide any indication, these headphone adapters would be bulky and pricey -- primarily because Lightning is a digital-only format and requires a separate DAC built into any analog audio connector. 

 

And the full length of the 3.5mm jack would now be external to the device. Picture a wafer-thin iPhone with this awkward dongle poking off the bottom for anyone who wants to use an analog headset. Not exactly the elegance that Apple purportedly aims for.

I really dislike nonconforming technology and I probably wouldn't buy an iPhone that would require an adaptor just so I could use my headphones but I guess it's not such a big deal for me as I don't have an iPhone. On my iPad though I don't have a problem with it as I use an Apogee One DAC that is connected via the Lightning Port, so in a way I have already moved on from using the built in 3.5mm jack. If Apple was to come out with a light weight DAC for the iPhone or even have it integrated into the phone itself I might change my mind but even then the odds that higher end headphones and I'm not talking about Beats will support this new format are pretty slim, so I would probably need an adaptor anyway.

 

Would an adaptor change the quality of the output, I ask because the HDMI adaptor for my iPad Air is very inconsistent, most of the time it mirrors the desktop at a 4:3 aspect ratio, plays videos at 720P and though I don't play many games I do like a few and their is noticeable lag with some, etc. Nothing compared to the experience when using  a device that has a built in HDM, for example my Nexus 10 which has a built in Micro HDMI, I just plug it in and it works, full HD so none of those awful black bars that drives me batty on my iPad Air, no lag and the image is sharp and quite pleasing to look at when viewing movies and photos. So I defiantly notice the difference between using a dongle and having the tech built in, will there be a downside in using a dongle that converts the single from digital to analog for the 3.5mm jack. Have you seen the inside of the HDMI dongle, it could probably run iOS all by itself with the amount of chips that are in it, not to mention it wasn't cheap, especially for something that does something so arbitrary as connecting the device a TV. I would pay 100 dollars more for my iPad if it had a built in HDMI port.

 

Which bring s me to my next question, is having less ports really all that necessary, will the power dongle have two Lightning ports on it so I could listen to music while the iPad charges or will I have to wait? Will Apple come out with a 4 Port Lighting Port adaptor because if they continue down this line it's going to be a must.


Edited by Relic - 6/6/14 at 12:51pm
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post #89 of 203
what if it comes in form of a lightning cable adapter to 3.5 mm headphone jack? While the market adjust to bluetooth & lightning headphones over the next couple of years?
post #90 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


"Crappy"? Who makes the most popular portable music player?

It's defiantly not crappy but nor are they anywhere near the best. I wish Apple would use the same chipset as the Fiio X3 or X5 line of MP3 Players. Bought an X5 or I should say got one for my birthday last year and it is by far the best sounding portable music player I have ever listened too, well iRivers Astell&Kern was the best but who pays 1200 dollars for an MP3 player. Anyway their defiantly like night and day better than the iPod, though I would rather use an iPod if it had the same tech, because the X3 and X5 are not only ugly as sin but their interface was made by a 12 year old on Ritalin.

 

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post #91 of 203
Bluetooth.
Cords are so last century.
 
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post #92 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJesC View Post

what if it comes in form of a lightning cable adapter to 3.5 mm headphone jack? While the market adjust to bluetooth & lightning headphones over the next couple of years?

 

Okay, but which headphone manufactures will offer Lightning port compatible models and what incentive would they have for doing so if the iPhone already comes with an adaptor, they could just continue making the 3.5mm jack version to cover everyone. This move has everything to do with Beats, they need to get that 3 Billion dollars back some how, what better way then to nudge people into buying their branded headphones.

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post #93 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


1) There is nothing preventing a simple adapter being used for 3.5mm headphones to work.

2) In what way is the Lightning connector expensive? In what way has it not gained traction in the marketplace? It sounds like you're confusing Thunderbolt with Lightning.


Very very frighting!

post #94 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post

Bluetooth.
Cords are so last century.

 

I have yet to own or use a pair of Bluetooth headphones that I was happy with not to mention the hassle of having to recharge the darn things every night. My outlets are one device from taking out a city grid, I think I will stick with 3.5mm cords for the foreseeable future.

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post #95 of 203
I'm all for a digital audio connection (not to mention the removal of a pocket lint collection port) but for the love of all that's holy use the extra space for more battery! How thin do our iPhones really need to be? Personally I preferred the heft of my iPhone 4 to my 5S.
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post #96 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

I have yet to own or use a pair of Bluetooth headphones that I was happy with not to mention the hassle of having to recharge the darn things every night. My outlets are one device from taking out a city grid, I think I will stick with 3.5mm cords for the foreseeable future.

Then welcome to dongle world.
 
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post #97 of 203
If they did this, I imagine there could be lightning cord that has a headphone jack coming off it as well. I would also imagine Bluetooth would be pushed as well.
post #98 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post


Then welcome to dongle world.


Nah, I will just continue not to buy an iPhone. My concerns are with my iPad, is Apple going to give us two Lightning Ports now or at least come out with a port extender. How does one listen to music while the unit is charging or connected to MIDI, my iPad stays pretty stationary most of the time as it's used primarily for music creation, so it's always plugged in, unplugging it so I can use my headphones while it's connected to my Monster or Novation Pad doesn't sound very appealing, no it sounds down right impossible unless I go with a Bluetooth headphones (which I will not do). I have quite a few friends who use their iPads for live music, they are going to absolutely hate playing musical chairs with their Lightning Port.


Edited by Relic - 6/6/14 at 1:24pm
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post #99 of 203
I suspect Apple will keep the headphone jack for a couple of reasons.

1. If it dumped a headphone jack, it couldn't get away with just one Lightning jack. People would not be able to charge and use an iPhone's mike/earphone at the same time.

2. That means two Lightning jacks on every iPhone. But that would add to an iPhone's cost, anger users with earphones they like, and add no additional capability to iPhones.

There is a slight possibility that Apple would come up with a separate MagSafe-like connector for earphones and perhaps even license it for other manufacturers. It'd certainly be a major change in the marketplace. Having a earphone connector that snaps off rather than yanking an iPhone around would be a major improvement too.
post #100 of 203

Ok, ditching the 3.5mm jack could allow for slimmer iPhones.  But what about cameras requiring more depth (for more functionality)?  I'm surprised Apple hasn't intro'd a wedge-shaped phone, akin to the MBA shape.  The larger end could allow for a better camera, the narrower end for a sense of remarkable slimness, the average thickness would still allow for at least the same volume of battery, and the difference in the two ends would make it even easier to orient to the home button/earpiece "ends" than the current design.

 

Thoughts?

post #101 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkling View Post

Having a earphone connector that snaps off rather than yanking an iPhone around would be a major improvement too.
Not sure about that, more than once I've dropped my iPhone but managed to catch it by the headphone cord before it hit the ground. Handy bit of contingency there!

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post #102 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtdunham View Post
 

Ok, ditching the 3.5mm jack could allow for slimmer iPhones.  But what about cameras requiring more depth (for more functionality)?  I'm surprised Apple hasn't intro'd a wedge-shaped phone, akin to the MBA shape.  The larger end could allow for a better camera, the narrower end for a sense of remarkable slimness, the average thickness would still allow for at least the same volume of battery, and the difference in the two ends would make it even easier to orient to the home button/earpiece "ends" than the current design.

 

Thoughts?


Apple still has a lot of space that they can knock off of the iPhone before they need to get rid of the 3.5mm jack. There are phones out now that have achieved 5.5mm. So I would like to see wireless connections between devices get a little faster not to mention more stable before we start getting rid of all the cables.

 

Vivo X3 - 5.57mm

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post #103 of 203
So let's recap the assumptions a lot of folks seem to be making, if Apple puts out an iPhone with a headphone lightning adapter:

1) All new iPhones will *stop* coming with the appropriate headphones.
2) All old iPhones will *magically* be converted to lightning, making everyone have to go out and buy new headphones or an adapter.
3) Apple will *require* you to go out and buy the new iPhone that is incompatible with your headphones.
4) Now that Beats is owned by Apple, their headphones will continue to be as mediocre (or whatever the current opinion is of them) as they are now and Apple won't be able to do anything about that.

1rolleyes.gif
Edited by JupiterOne - 6/6/14 at 1:53pm
post #104 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

It would use the same port, requiring pass-through adapters if you want to listen a charge at the same time. There would be no 2nd Lightning port.

Using the Lightning port for audio makes it easier to connect the iPhone into the car. If a person wants to charge while listening, then a charging stand built into a speaker box makes good sense. More Apple-only stuff to elbow Android off into a corner.
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post #105 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by JupiterOne View Post

So let's recap the assumptions a lot of folks seem to be making, if Apple puts out an iPhone with a headphone lightning adapter:

1) All new iPhones will *stop* coming with the appropriate headphones.
2) All old iPhones will *magically* be converted to lightning, making everyone have to go out and buy new headphones or an adapter.
3) Apple will *require* you to go out and buy the new iPhone that is incompatible with your headphones.
4) Now that Beats is owned by Apple, their headphones will continue to be as mediocre (or whatever the current opinion is of them) as they are now and Apple won't be able to do anything about that.

Don't the iPhones with a lightning connector already offer "sound out" at the lightning connector now? If so, then dropping the old earphone jack will allow backward compatibility to old devices for new earphones.
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post #106 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post
 

I really dislike nonconforming technology and I probably wouldn't buy an iPhone that would require an adaptor just so I could use my headphones but I guess it's not such a big deal for me as I don't have an iPhone. On my iPad though I don't have a problem with it as I use an Apogee One DAC that is connected via the Lightning Port, so in a way I have already moved on from using the built in 3.5mm jack. If Apple was to come out with a light weight DAC for the iPhone or even have it integrated into the phone itself I might change my mind but even then the odds that higher end headphones and I'm not talking about Beats will support this new format are pretty slim, so I would probably need an adaptor anyway.

 

Seems that Apple is already talking about designing "headphone modules" with accessory makers that provide analog outputs and system control integration. I would assume that these modules could also enable multiple ports for plugging in other devices.

 

http://appleinsider.com/articles/14/06/05/apple-announces-lightning-enabled-headphone-standard-in-wwdc-session

 

While it might enable a new range of accessory designs and features, standardizing around Lightning headphones still makes the basic headphone design more complicated, because the headphones would need to integrate all the digital-to-analog functionality that the phone itself currently performs. The basic design of the 3.5mm jack with its long plug would make any "headphone module" protrude from the Lightning connector in a big way. It won't be pretty.

Quote:

Would an adaptor change the quality of the output, I ask because the HDMI adaptor for my iPad Air is very inconsistent, most of the time it mirrors the desktop at a 4:3 aspect ratio, plays videos at 720P and though I don't play many games I do like a few and their is noticeable lag with some, etc. Nothing compared to the experience when using  a device that has a built in HDM, for example my Nexus 10 which has a built in Micro HDMI, I just plug it in and it works, full HD so none of those awful black bars that drives me batty on my iPad Air, no lag and the image is sharp and quite pleasing to look at when viewing movies and photos. So I defiantly notice the difference between using a dongle and having the tech built in, will there be a downside in using a dongle that converts the single from digital to analog for the 3.5mm jack. Have you seen the inside of the HDMI dongle, it could probably run iOS all by itself with the amount of chips that are in it, not to mention it wasn't cheap, especially for something that does something so arbitrary as connecting the device a TV. I would pay 100 dollars more for my iPad if it had a built in HDMI port.

 

HDMI is one of those standards where functionality and performance took a backseat to other considerations, namely copy protection. The need for device-to-device authentication really slows things down, and the design of the connector itself always seemed more like an afterthought -- it's horrible. The HDCP (high-bandwidth digital content protection) handshake authentication between devices using HDMI has always been a source of latency and other potential issues. Plus, you have multiple versions of the HDMI standard with different bandwidth capacity and format support capabilities. Adding an adapter into the chain creates an additional step that can cause a bottleneck for any number of reasons.

 

It's not an issue for digital audio, because those formats do not require any kind of device authentication.

post #107 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkling View Post

I suspect Apple will keep the headphone jack for a couple of reasons.

1. If it dumped a headphone jack, it couldn't get away with just one Lightning jack. People would not be able to charge and use an iPhone's mike/earphone at the same time.

2. That means two Lightning jacks on every iPhone. But that would add to an iPhone's cost, anger users with earphones they like, and add no additional capability to iPhones.

There is a slight possibility that Apple would come up with a separate MagSafe-like connector for earphones and perhaps even license it for other manufacturers. It'd certainly be a major change in the marketplace. Having a earphone connector that snaps off rather than yanking an iPhone around would be a major improvement too.

There is a "head of design" job available at Samsung for which you are well fit... Go and have a long career mucking up their products with your lack of imagination.
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post #108 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post

Bluetooth.
Cords are so last century.

Sound quality was so last century.

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post #109 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtdunham View Post

Ok, ditching the 3.5mm jack could allow for slimmer iPhones.  But what about cameras requiring more depth (for more functionality)?  I'm surprised Apple hasn't intro'd a wedge-shaped phone, akin to the MBA shape.  The larger end could allow for a better camera, the narrower end for a sense of remarkable slimness, the average thickness would still allow for at least the same volume of battery, and the difference in the two ends would make it even easier to orient to the home button/earpiece "ends" than the current design.

Thoughts?

It's a phone, not a doorstop.

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post #110 of 203

The iPhone needs to be thinner?  Seriously?  Apple are you not listening to customers who say they want significantly better battery life?

 

I have a bad feeling about this.  3.5 mm is by its nature an open standard.  I'm suspicious of Apple's intensions and that they might just be using "size" as an excuse, especially in the light of the whole Beats thing.

 

Apple has made it very difficult to get digital audio out of iDevices traditionally so I don't see this changing things.

post #111 of 203

I just hope Dr, Dre tunes these headphones so we can all finally heat what the music is supposed to really sound like.

 

/s

post #112 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by JupiterOne View Post

So let's recap the assumptions a lot of folks seem to be making, if Apple puts out an iPhone with a headphone lightning adapter:

1) All new iPhones will *stop* coming with the appropriate headphones.
2) All old iPhones will *magically* be converted to lightning, making everyone have to go out and buy new headphones or an adapter.
3) Apple will *require* you to go out and buy the new iPhone that is incompatible with your headphones.
4) Now that Beats is owned by Apple, their headphones will continue to be as mediocre (or whatever the current opinion is of them) as they are now and Apple won't be able to do anything about that.

1rolleyes.gif

The same arguments were posted about the introduction of the Lightning connector, when it replaced the 30-pin iPod Dock Connector. Except instead of "headphones" it was sound docks and charging cradles. Whining and complaining. Accusations of greed.

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post #113 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by s.metcalf View Post


I have a bad feeling about this.  3.5 mm is by its nature an open standard.  I'm suspicious of Apple's intensions and that they might just be using "size" as an excuse, especially in the light of the whole Beats thing.

This is how conspiracy theories start: interpret facts and hearsay together in such a way that some overarching, evil plan ties it all together neatly and explains everything in terms of what you are already inclined to believe about Apple.

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post #114 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by launfall View Post

Bad idea and not feasible. Lightening is still too expensive, many people have incompatible headphones they paid a lot of money for, Lightening has gained virtually no traction in the marketplace, the plugs fall out at the slightest jarring...I could go on and on. This is one of those "upgrades" Apple should not try to cram down our throats.

I think this misses the point that "any" headphones can be used with the iPhone/iPad/iPod. Barrel/Minijack connectors are designed to move and rotate. Lightning isn't. I'd advise Apple to take a look at the Nintendo GBA SP (The first clamshell design GBA) when they removed the headphone jack, only to put it back on all subsequent portable devices. What you had to do, to use headphones on the GBA SP was buy a third-party adapter that plugged into the charging port, so you had this unnecessary dongle that hung off the device, giving it just one more reason to wear out the connector. Sorry, Apple but this is a BAD idea. Also Nokia did this before as well (headset/carkit's that only connect to the pin array at the bottom of the device) and also stopped doing it.

If Apple wants to make the headphone jack smaller, they should use the 2.5mm TRRS minijack connector. A 3.5mm to 2.5mm adapter would extend maybe 3cm to the cable length, but not make it any less convenient. The flaw I saw with using the lightning connector is that all that would happen is people would have a 3.5mm TRRS or 3.5mm TRRS TOSLink adapter constantly plugged into it, making the overall profile of the device larger. This is not helping Apple's case to make the device smaller when a standard feature has to be added back at the expense of the lightning connector.
Edited by Misa - 6/6/14 at 3:28pm
post #115 of 203

Don't forget all the third party opportunities for cases with an uber-battery, lightning wedgie built-in...and 3.5" jacks. I can see AAPL killing the jack, not so much because it needs the space, but because it is tech that sucks, and the alternatives attractive.

post #116 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


The same arguments were posted about the introduction of the Lightning connector, when it replaced the 30-pin iPod Dock Connector. Except instead of "headphones" it was sound docks and charging cradles. Whining and complaining. Accusations of greed.

Well yes and no, this is a little different as Apple is taking something away not simply changing it. I hated the 30 PIN adaptor and welcomed the change. I still don't understand how Apple is going to solve the listening to music through earphones while charging or when using something like MIDI. Is Apple going to add two Lightning Ports to the iPad, which by the way I don't have a problem with as I wish I had two now or at least a 4 way port replicator. I would even be fine if the charging cable added an extra port but that doesn't seem like a really clean design.

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post #117 of 203
This is idiotic.

>The entire iPhone 5s, in comparison, is just 7.1 millimeters thick.

>Apple is already said to have run into trouble making batteries thin enough for its next-generation iPhone

So why must it be even thinner? Beyond a certain point (and I happen to think it's been reached), thinner is not better.
post #118 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

Well yes and no, this is a little different as Apple is taking something away not simply changing it.
I don't see this as being any different than Apple taking away the floppy disc to make way for the DVD player. Or taking away the DVD player to make way for "download only". Or taking away the ethernet port to make way for "wireless only".....and probably a dozen other examples. Apple has done all this before; transitioning from one thing to another. Every time, people can't see how they will ever do without, but eventually, they do. Whatever the concern, Apple always seems to figure it out.
post #119 of 203
Originally Posted by launfall View Post
Lightening is still too expensive.

 

Wrong.

 
…many people have incompatible headphones... 

 

Nothing will be incompatible.

 
…Lightening has gained virtually no traction in the marketplace

 

Totally wrong.

 
, the plugs fall out at the slightest jarring…

 

Nope.

 
I could go on and on.

 

Being completely and utterly wrong? Looks like.

 

Originally Posted by jmgregory1 View Post
Apple needs to focus some attention on eliminating headphone wires altogether

 

Bluetooth. You’re welcome.

 

Originally Posted by ARTisZing View Post
Could this be part of the reason why Apple purchased Beats?

 

What does Beats have to do with Lightning?

 

Originally Posted by Zozman View Post
If Apple goes ahead with this, without have an adapter of some sort, it would be a terrible mistake. 

 

I love it that people get these mind-numbingly imbecilic ideas in their heads and then IMMEDIATELY PRETEND THEY ARE FACT, much less a possibility.

 

Originally Posted by Woochifer View Post
Bad idea. It would instantly render iPhones incompatible with all existing analog headphones.

 

Again, completely wrong.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
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  • Lightning headphones could allow Apple to make slimmer iPhones by ditching 3.5mm headphone jack
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