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OS X Yosemite first look video: AirDrop with iOS 8

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
As part of the "continuity" additions Apple introduced with its upcoming operating systems, the company enabled AirDrop between systems running OS X 10.10 Yosemite and iOS 8, a long-awaited feature for many users who own both Mac and iOS devices.



In the OS X Yosemite developer preview, AirDrop works much the same it did in OS X 10.9 Mavericks, but extended to iOS devices. The new operating systems, however, will allow file transfers from Mac-to-iOS and vice versa, bringing a higher level of device integration for owners invested in Apple's ecosystem.

Despite sharing the same name, AirDrop was previously segregated into two versions; one for iOS-to-iOS transfers and another for Mac-to-Mac. This made the process of transmitting files a bit confusing for some users who expected AirDrop to work seamlessly across Apple's computer and mobile platforms.

With the new continuity functions built into Yosemite and iOS 8, which are themselves based on the Bluetooth and Wi-Fi wireless standards, Apple is able to integrate high-level sharing assets into its two major OS lines. There exists third-party software that can swap certain files or raw data between the platforms, but the new AirDrop is the first truly seamless, system-wide solution.

AirDrop can be accessed from the Share Sheets menu on both iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite. The desktop version also has a dedicated window in the Finder, much like the current implementation in OS X 10.9 Mavericks.

As seen in the video above, tapping the share button in iOS invokes the Share Sheets menu pane, from which users can elect to pass along a file, photo, webpage or other asset via AirDrop, Mail, iTunes and more.

In our test, we chose to transfer a photo from an iPhone to a Mac Pro. While we didn't have to set up or complete a Bluetooth pairing procedure, the devices were unable to recognize each other on the first few attempts. Toggling the iPhone's Bluetooth on and off resolved the issue and sharing worked flawlessly from that point on.

We were able to send across multiple photos, webpages, PDFs and other files from iOS-to-Mac, both with and without the OS X AirDrop window active in Finder. Unlike Mac-to-Mac transfers, owners logged in to their iCloud account on an iOS 8 device and OS X Yosemite computer are able to share files without consent. This is unsurprising given other features like phone calls and SMS messages can be pushed to a Mac under Apple's new OS continuity program.


AirDrop settings in OS X 10.10 Yosemite.


It appears that the future AirDrop version for OS X is incompatible with the current standard, however, as Yosemite provides an option to "Legacy AirDrop" with Macs running Mavericks or older. The system cannot dynamically switch between the two AirDrop versions, suggesting the "new" AirDrop handles wireless protocols in a completely different manner than previous OS X iterations.

As mentioned in the our OS X Yosemite first look video covering Handoff, data exchange from Mac-to-iOS device appears to be non-functional. When the final version ships, however, we expect the feature to be operational, with familiar user icons popping up in the Finder window just as they do for Mac-to-Mac transfers in Mavericks.
post #2 of 51
At the moment I use the awesome PhotoSync which also allows you to upload to Dropbox and a plethora of other services and devices. Device to device is reliant on both being on the same network. As I only use it to upload photos from my iPhone to my Mac I am very likely a lost customer. C'est la vie.
post #3 of 51
Anyone know if the new extension api's will let you store or access these files as we could with icloud?

I have still to watch all of the sessions or try the beta but how does this change or add to syncing apps with icloud?

Can a user save, and decide to make a new file?
post #4 of 51
My airdrop will not work on my mid 2011 iMac with my iPhone 5. I see the option to airdrop everyone like in your screenshot above but it's only there for a split second and then it disappears. Is that a beta glitch or will my hardware not support this functionality?
post #5 of 51
Great, but what's up with that cheesy piano music?
post #6 of 51

I don't ever see these videos, just a blank line (Safari Version 7.0.4 (9537.76.4)). What am I doing wrong (right lol)?

Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #7 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

I don't ever see these videos, just a blank line (Safari Version 7.0.4 (9537.76.4)). What am I doing wrong (right lol)?

Did you click the link in the article?
post #8 of 51

Mother of humanity, why is AirDrop so terrible? Why do we have to be IN it to do it?

 

How could it possibly be so difficult as to offer an AirDrop tab, you click it, and boom, there’s everyone on the local network. Drag a file to the person, they get a popup: “[name] wants to share a file with you. Accept/Deny” There’s your security problems solved.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #9 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Shadow View Post


Did you click the link in the article?

Okay, thanks. I don't ever click on the article banner but go straight to the comments page. Was a time when content played there too but not so now apparently.

Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #10 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Mother of humanity, why is AirDrop so terrible? Why do we have to be IN it to do it?

How could it possibly be so difficult as to offer an AirDrop tab, you click it, and boom, there’s everyone on the local network. Drag a file to the person, they get a popup: “[name] wants to share a file with you. Accept/Deny” There’s your security problems solved.

I think it has a lot to do with their own API's. You can make your own API's and have the functionality that you're looking for, you just can't share them. Send your feedback.

However I think this article is clearly beta related and I doubt it will be so insecure in the final release.
post #11 of 51
So here's a question for you - if the OSX version of Airdrop has been changed, has it been changed to use the iOS version, or are both versions for the new upcoming OS's a completely new iteration from the previous version(s)? I'd like to see someone try to Airdrop from an iOS7 device to Yosemite...
post #12 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

Mother of humanity, why is AirDrop so terrible? Why do we have to be IN it to do it?

 

How could it possibly be so difficult as to offer an AirDrop tab, you click it, and boom, there’s everyone on the local network. Drag a file to the person, they get a popup: “[name] wants to share a file with you. Accept/Deny” There’s your security problems solved.


I don't know about you, but I'm assuming this could possibly be incredibly annoying - imagine a university and someone just pinging everyone on the network (or even worse, the same person, over and over). Not good.

 

On another note, has anyone managed to toggle the "Everyone" or "Contacts Only" switch in Airdrop on the Mac?? Mine seems to be un-toggleable... That is, it is not a button. I can't do anything. And my "Preferences" in Finder are blank, empty. Force relaunch, restart of computer don't fix it. Hoping a reinstall isn't required. 

post #13 of 51

I don't think this will work with my 2009 MBP and iPhone 5 like many other features that are great with the new OS that won't work with it. It's sad when you buy a new computer from Apple and it last so long and is so great that you don't get those benefits. For those of us retired and on a fixed budget we can't go out and buy new computers we have to use what we bought when we could afford it. Could any beta testers out there tell me if I am wrong in this assumption?

post #14 of 51
Originally Posted by mwhiteco View Post
I don't think this will work with my 2009 MBP and iPhone 5 like many other features that are great with the new OS that won't work with it. It's sad when you buy a new computer from Apple and it last so long and is so great that you don't get those benefits. For those of us retired and on a fixed budget we can't go out and buy new computers we have to use what we bought when we could afford it. Could any beta testers out there tell me if I am wrong in this assumption?


As you can turn on AirDrop on machines as old as 2006, I imagine it’ll be fine.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #15 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ques4Sanity View Post

So here's a question for you - if the OSX version of Airdrop has been changed, has it been changed to use the iOS version, or are both versions for the new upcoming OS's a completely new iteration from the previous version(s)? I'd like to see someone try to Airdrop from an iOS7 device to Yosemite...

They are new versions.

You must be using both Mac OS 10.10 and iOS 8.

You cannot AirDrop to Mac OS using iOS 7.

post #16 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

Mother of humanity, why is AirDrop so terrible? Why do we have to be IN it to do it?

 

How could it possibly be so difficult as to offer an AirDrop tab, you click it, and boom, there’s everyone on the local network. Drag a file to the person, they get a popup: “[name] wants to share a file with you. Accept/Deny” There’s your security problems solved.

This is for security, so that you can't just go into an airport or Starbucks and try to send malware to people nearby. Sure, most people will probably click "deny", but all it takes is one person every now and then to click "allow".

 

This way, they have to be explicitly and knowingly participating in AirDrop. And with iOS 8 and Yosemite, it looks like it auto-allows any from the same Apple ID, which makes sense, since you probably aren't trying to trick yourself into running malware.

post #17 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwhiteco View Post
 

I don't think this will work with my 2009 MBP and iPhone 5 like many other features that are great with the new OS that won't work with it. It's sad when you buy a new computer from Apple and it last so long and is so great that you don't get those benefits. For those of us retired and on a fixed budget we can't go out and buy new computers we have to use what we bought when we could afford it. Could any beta testers out there tell me if I am wrong in this assumption?


This has to do with hardware limitations. Any device that could use AirDrop in Mavericks and iOS 7 will work with Yosemite and iOS 8.

post #18 of 51
If you mac can run Mavericks it will run Yosemite, I think 2009 MBP should be ok, some macs as far back as 2007 will be able to run it ( iMac I think )
post #19 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 


As you can turn on AirDrop on machines as old as 2006, I imagine it’ll be fine.


Thanks for the help I didn't know it would work on my MBP I have never needed it before but with it now working between iPhone's and Mac's I will use it. Will answering the phone with the new OS on my older computer work if you know?

post #20 of 51
Love the jazz music in these videos. I didn't think my 2008 iMac would be able to use Airdrop, but others here disagree, so I look forward to testing it on December 19th or earlier in the autumn.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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post #21 of 51
My mistake. My eyes are inverted. Looking at too many numbers. 1smile.gif
Edited by Silver Shadow - 6/8/14 at 4:28am
post #22 of 51
The article fails to answer the most crucial questions: where will transferred files end up on iOS ? Will you be able to transfer all kinds of files to iOS?
post #23 of 51
"Mother of humanity, why is AirDrop so terrible? Why do we have to be IN it to do it?

How could it possibly be so difficult as to offer an AirDrop tab, you click it, and boom, there's everyone on the local network. Drag a file to the person, they get a popup: "[name] wants to share a file with you. Accept/Deny" There's your security problems solved."

I agree. Good lord, surprising they don't have it function as effortlessly as you laid out.

"Keep it simple stupid"... AirDrop would be a great place to use that approach for the masses.
post #24 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

At the moment I use the awesome PhotoSync which also allows you to upload to Dropbox and a plethora of other services and devices. Device to device is reliant on both being on the same network. As I only use it to upload photos from my iPhone to my Mac I am very likely a lost customer. C'est la vie.

I thought the same until I remember that AirDrop works entirely locally. If you are out in the field without WiFi router, this will beat DropBox and similar services.
post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Mother of humanity, why is AirDrop so terrible? Why do we have to be IN it to do it?

How could it possibly be so difficult as to offer an AirDrop tab, you click it, and boom, there’s everyone on the local network. Drag a file to the person, they get a popup: “[name] wants to share a file with you. Accept/Deny” There’s your security problems solved.

My guess is: security, potential interference and power saving.

Since this thing is peer to peer, they may have to scan the surrounding continuously for new devices showing up.
This sucks power if it is always-on.

They may need to add iBeacon to the stack for its low power BT discovery.

Perhaps next release. Just like how AirPlay adds BT discovery and then peer-to-peer over 2 releases. I remember they had some unexpected BT vs WiFi bug on the Mac some months ago. Plus this new AirDrop tech is different from the old one. They may have spent some engineering time to allow fast switching between these 2 protocols. Otherwise, the new and old AirDrop stack may need additional discovery time during switching.
post #26 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Mother of humanity, why is AirDrop so terrible? Why do we have to be IN it to do it?

How could it possibly be so difficult as to offer an AirDrop tab, you click it, and boom, there’s everyone on the local network. Drag a file to the person, they get a popup: “[name] wants to share a file with you. Accept/Deny” There’s your security problems solved.
Wtf are you babbling about? That's EXACTLY how it works....for devices with the same AppleID, which is all that makes any sense.

Separate AppleIDs could be totally separate uninterested parties, and no you should not be able to sneak files onto their machines.
post #27 of 51

One thing seems abundantly clear:

 

Apple's HIG and related design principles have shifted, from pre-iOS concerns about ensuring that interfaces are so simple and obvious that anyone and their dog could use them without any learning curve (relatively), to post-iOS concerns about designing "computer" or rather "device" interfaces that are very similar in form and function to the appliances we use every day as a matter of course: iOS and Android devices. 

 

From a pre-iOS perspective the UI design changes in Yosemite aren't very thoughtful from a new-user perspective - that is, the "I don't know about all that computer and phone stuff" perspective that is gradually fading away. There's much less UI hand-holding. But from the perspective of those by now accustomed to iOS and Android devices, most of it will look familiar, and in some ways we no longer require clearly-defined buttons or "depth" in order to help us distinguish certain elements from one another. Folks are just more technologically aware and know what to expect. 

 

The only little niggle in all this, is that some of these iOS carry-over elements look a little out of place at this stage. They look natural on a handheld device, but look rather wonky in more places than not on a "computer" display. I imagine that Apple will naturally clean all this up for Release. 

post #28 of 51
Finally! I finally don't have to iMessage files to myself to get them to and from my Mac and iDevices.

Quote:
Originally Posted by xPad View Post

This is for security, so that you can't just go into an airport or Starbucks and try to send malware to people nearby. Sure, most people will probably click "deny", but all it takes is one person every now and then to click "allow".

This way, they have to be explicitly and knowingly participating in AirDrop. And with iOS 8 and Yosemite, it looks like it auto-allows any from the same Apple ID, which makes sense, since you probably aren't trying to trick yourself into running malware.

Quoting this because it needs to be stated again.

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post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

One thing seems abundantly clear:

Apple's HIG and related design principles have shifted, from pre-iOS concerns about ensuring that interfaces are so simple and obvious that anyone and their dog could use them without any learning curve (relatively), to post-iOS concerns about designing "computer" or rather "device" interfaces that are very similar in form and function to the appliances we use every day as a matter of course: iOS and Android devices. 

From a pre-iOS perspective the UI design changes in Yosemite aren't very thoughtful from a new-user perspective - that is, the "I don't know about all that computer and phone stuff" perspective that is gradually fading away. There's much less UI hand-holding. But from the perspective of those by now accustomed to iOS and Android devices, most of it will look familiar, and in some ways we no longer require clearly-defined buttons or "depth" in order to help us distinguish certain elements from one another. Folks are just more technologically aware and know what to expect. 

The only little niggle in all this, is that some of these iOS carry-over elements look a little out of place at this stage. They look natural on a handheld device, but look rather wonky in more places than not on a "computer" display. I imagine that Apple will naturally clean all this up for Release. 

This is understandable. Once you get to Grandma Threshold Alpha-60 which is where your grandmother can show how to do 60% of the functions on an iDevice then Apple can move to adding more features without having to worry about their users not being able to understand how they are implemented.

Have you tried using split-screen mode on a Surface? It's not very intuitive but if MS made the basics intuitive -and- it was popular enough they could add the other features down the line that aren't obvious while knowing that the GTA-60 effect would allow for quick adoption. Perhaps that's a sign Apple will offer that feature with iOS 9 on the iPad.
Edited by SolipsismX - 6/8/14 at 8:35am

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #30 of 51
We now have the ability to share/use the same documents in iCloud. I work on a Numbers document on my Mac, then swith over to my iPad when I am watching TV. The next day when I get to work i can use iClound on a PC. on the web to access the document. Now we will be able to send this document from device to device. That sounds like an additional step and loses the syncd document feature. They are also giving dropbox funtionality. I don't get how this helps me, considering I have iCloud.
post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwhiteco View Post
 

I don't think this will work with my 2009 MBP and iPhone 5 like many other features that are great with the new OS that won't work with it. It's sad when you buy a new computer from Apple and it last so long and is so great that you don't get those benefits. For those of us retired and on a fixed budget we can't go out and buy new computers we have to use what we bought when we could afford it. Could any beta testers out there tell me if I am wrong in this assumption?

I hear you. As a retired ( aka, unemployed)  person for the last 7 years, I had to see all of these new OSs and apps pass me by, as I was stuck in 32 bit mode hell (late 2006 iMac). I finally took the plunge, stopped waiting to be able to afford another new computer, and bought a second hand late 2009 iMac from an Apple dealer.....and Heavens to Betsy....I'm really enjoying my computer again. No more computer envy. Mavericks is wonderful and, hopefully, it will be a few years before I get left behind again. People like you and I, sadly, pay the price for Apple's relentless drive to always do what's best for the customer, even when some of us suffer....but I wouldn't have it any other way. After all, the alternative is Microsoft's way.....keep dragging all of the legacy software into the new OSs which almost guarantees an OS that satisfies no one. Keep on trucking, my friend. Good luck and happy computing.  :)

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post #32 of 51

Sweet!

 

This is the revenge of aqua.

I love the new UI, even the new folder’s icon.

post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by hagar View Post

The article fails to answer the most crucial questions: where will transferred files end up on iOS ? Will you be able to transfer all kinds of files to iOS?

I'm assuming a folder in iCloud Drive titled "Airdrop"

post #34 of 51

I never store any files locally except temporary, I assume if my NAS is mounted as a drive in OSX I will be able to AirDrop any files from my iPad directly to it.

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post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


This is understandable. Once you get to Grandma Threshold Alpha-60 which is where your grandmother can show how to do 60% of the functions on an iDevice then Apple can move to adding more features without having to worry about their users not being able to understand how they are implemented.

Have you tried using split-screen mode on a Surface? It's not very intuitive but if MS made the basics intuitive -and- it was popular enough they could add the other features down the line that aren't obvious while knowing that the GTA-60 effect would allow for quick adoption. Perhaps that's a sign Apple will offer that feature with iOS 9 on the iPad.


Excellent point. But at this stage, it might be even more important to fight the urge to release early, and instead *release it right*. 

post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Excellent point. But at this stage, it might be even more important to fight the urge to release early, and instead *release it right*. 

Oh, I didn't mean to imply that Apple (or anyone else) should release early. I think it's best to release it right every time.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Oh, I didn't mean to imply that Apple (or anyone else) should release early. I think it's best to release it right every time.

Yes, I was just adding to your comment. We're in agreement. 1smile.gif
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by agsmith87 View Post


I don't know about you, but I'm assuming this could possibly be incredibly annoying - imagine a university and someone just pinging everyone on the network (or even worse, the same person, over and over). Not good.

On another note, has anyone managed to toggle the "Everyone" or "Contacts Only" switch in Airdrop on the Mac?? Mine seems to be un-toggleable... That is, it is not a button. I can't do anything. And my "Preferences" in Finder are blank, empty. Force relaunch, restart of computer don't fix it. Hoping a reinstall isn't required. 

Put ignore list, or make user choose in settings if he wants to make his device permanently visible (with confirmation pop up).

I'm with TS on this one. One of major reasons why I prefer ThinkPad Tablet to iPad is exactly that - easy access to other devices in my home network.
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwhiteco View Post
 

I don't think this will work with my 2009 MBP and iPhone 5 like many other features that are great with the new OS that won't work with it. It's sad when you buy a new computer from Apple and it last so long and is so great that you don't get those benefits. For those of us retired and on a fixed budget we can't go out and buy new computers we have to use what we bought when we could afford it. Could any beta testers out there tell me if I am wrong in this assumption?

 

Your Mac still has all the features that were advertised when you bought it, plus much more. Airdrop depends on HARDWARE that does not exist in your 2009 MBP, namely adhoc WIFI. It's therefor impossible for Apple to give you the capability, and it is unreasonable to expect it. When you buy a computer/device, you should expect a reasonable support for software upgrades, but you should expect new hardware capabilities to magically be added to your device after it is shipped and sold. Yes, no doubt it would be great if you could use airdrop, but thankfully you have many other options that can fulfil the same purpose (dropbox, etc).

post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

Mother of humanity, why is AirDrop so terrible? Why do we have to be IN it to do it?

 

How could it possibly be so difficult as to offer an AirDrop tab, you click it, and boom, there’s everyone on the local network. Drag a file to the person, they get a popup: “[name] wants to share a file with you. Accept/Deny” There’s your security problems solved.

 

Because unlike other companies, Apple takes your security and privacy very seriously, even if they need to inconvenience yo with a couple more clicks. I for one appreciate it. 

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