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Latest leak purports to show closer look at back panel of Apple's 'iPhone 6' - Page 3

post #81 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
Swift:
Code:
let myTableView: UITableView = UITableView(frame: CGRectZero, style: .Grouped)

 

Don't you still have to write initialization code for that "let"? It is not automatic in Swift. I'm pretty sure that is Obj-C shorthand not Swift shorthand.

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post #82 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by cicconegreek View Post

You know i love apple!! But at last they should make something new!

They can only change the outer part but so much.
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post #83 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

You still have to write initialization code for that "let".

Sure, this is still writing code. It sounds like you'd only be happy if the code wrote itself from a thought you had.

I don't think Apple made any comment that it was going to be magic, just that Swift will reduce time and effort from the amount of code (in most cases) to reducing bugs and making it generally safer.

The readability is world's better without the extreme repetition, excessive '@' symbols and brackets, but my favorite is the inclusion of values in strings.
Code:
println("I picked \(number) \(fruit).")

Edited by SolipsismX - 6/9/14 at 5:32pm

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post #84 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

They can only change the outer part but so much.
You know, i don't mean the material. Okay the anode aluminium is good, but they can do something new, not again these 2 places on the top and the bottom of the rear side. Anyway i hope Tim Cook finally keep his 2013 promise and ll see at last all these "amazing new products" this fall.
post #85 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Sure, this is still writing code. It sounds like you'd only be happy if the code wrote itself from a thought you had.
 

No I'm all in on Swift,  I just don't have enough info on how it is going to work during transition or how one gets by without being familiar with the NS references. All I'm saying about "init", is that code you mentioned is not substantially shorter because you still have to initialize it somewhere else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Sure, this is still writing code. It sounds like you'd only be happy if the code wrote itself from a thought you had.

The readability is world's better without the extreme repetition, excessive '@' symbols and brackets, but my favorite is the inclusion of values in strings.
Code:
println("I picked \(number) \(fruit).")

 

NSLog(@"I picked %i %@.", number, fruit);

 

The Swift version is probably  more readable from a concatenation perceptive but it isn't any shorter.

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post #86 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

No I'm all in on Swift,  I just don't have enough info on how it is going to work during transition or how one gets by without being familiar with the NS references. All I'm saying about "init", is that code you mentioned is not substantially shorter because you still have to initialize it somewhere else.

Code:
NSLog(@"I picked %i %@", number, fruit);

The Swift version is probably  more readable from a concatenation perceptive but it isn't any shorter.

In that example you have still less characters — 41 for Obj-C v 39 for Swift, which won't always be the case — but shorter also refers to various time elements involved. Having to use the @ symbol constantly (there wasn't an example of excessive brackets here), and trying to read the code and figure out what's going on will be huge time savers in both learning to use the code as well as others coming into project and trying to get up to speed. Again, there is a lot more than be done and I'm sure will be done as Swift matures but this is a great start.


edit:
Code:
Xcode 4:
NSArray *names = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects: @"Tom", @"Dick", @"Harry", nil];

Xcode 5:
NSArray *names = @[@"Tom", @"Dick", @"Harry"];

Swift:
let names = ["Tom", "Dick", "Harry"]

Edited by SolipsismX - 6/9/14 at 6:08pm

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post #87 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

In that example you have still less characters — 41 for Obj-C v 39 for Swift, which won't always be the case — but shorter also refers to various time elements involved. Having to use the @ symbol constantly (there wasn't an example of excessive brackets here), and trying to read the code and figure out what's going on will be huge time savers in both learning to use the code as well as others coming into project and trying to get up to speed. Again, there is a lot more than be done and I'm sure will be done as Swift matures but this is a great start.

I don't disagree. I am just making a point that programming with Swift without a working knowledge of Obj-C is not all that easy right now because there are limited examples or documentation available. Programming is programming. I've been through a few different languages over the past couple decades. I was never, and still not, a huge fan of Obj-C, but if you want to write iOS apps that is what we use. In many ways it is better than pure C. NeXt really took the high road when they forked C. Java and C++/C# broke all compatibility with C and Swift is staying on that course by leveraging the compiler functionality to remain binary compatible even though the language is not.

 

With respect to the code examples: the placeholder replacement style of Obj-C comes directly from traditional C and Regular Expression syntax which is rather nerdy so I see your point, however I still think Swift's supplanting of Obj-C is not going to happen overnight. It will probably be a mash-up for a number of years. As I mentioned earlier, go look at what Apple is offering as an example of a Swift app on dev. It looks a lot like Obj-C to me.

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post #88 of 104
Originally Posted by cicconegreek View Post
Mean @ssholes are not allowed to comment too, but they do!

 

Try looking at the pictures before spewing lies instead, okay champ?

post #89 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

...however I still think Swift's supplanting of Obj-C is not going to happen overnight. It will probably be a mash-up for a number of years.

Sure. I bet a decade from now there will still be code that need the 'NS' prefix, but it's a great start and not one that anyone was expecting. And frankly, anything that will reduce time and effort, even if just a little right now is a big deal to me.

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post #90 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
Code:
Xcode 5:
NSArray *names = @[@"Tom", @"Dick", @"Harry"];

Swift:
let names = ["Tom", "Dick", "Harry"]

I think it is worth mentioning that the @ signs are a signal to the compiler that what follows is Obj-C code, not traditional C code. Swift inherits its abbreviated syntax to the fact that the compiler engineers figured out a way to recognize , C, Obj-C and Swift code automatically thus the shorthand of Swift can be used sans semicolons, etc.  The same type of shorthand simplification has been ongoing within Obj-C itself, as well, over the last couple of versions of Xcode/LLVM, just not as dramatically as with the announcement of Swift.

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post #91 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
Code:
Xcode 5:
NSArray *names = @[@"Tom", @"Dick", @"Harry"];

Swift:
let names = ["Tom", "Dick", "Harry"]

Swift is new. I have not tested it at all. One thing I question about the above code is how do the bounds check work with a Swift array. If I asked for the value of names{101] , what would I get back? I know what the answer is in NSArray.

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post #92 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I think it is worth mentioning that the @ signs are a signal to the compiler that what follows is Obj-C code, not traditional C code. Swift inherits its abbreviated syntax to the fact that the compiler engineers figured out a way to recognize , C, Obj-C and Swift code automatically thus the shorthand of Swift can be used sans semicolons, etc.  The same type of shorthand simplification has been ongoing within Obj-C itself, as well, over the last couple of versions of Xcode/LLMV, just not as dramatically as with the announcement of Swift.

Sure, but that was a huge annoyance for me when trying to learning Obj-C and also attempting to write it today. Besides being visually unappealing I find it easy to omit an @ not catch it right away.

Personally, I wish Swift did even more by realizing that Tom, Dick, and Harry are single word strings and allowing me to omit the quotes unless it's required. For example, let me use...
Code:
let names = [Tom, Dick, Harry]

...or add the quotes if the string will have a space...
Code:
let names = [Tom, "Dick Applebaum", Harry]

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post #93 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Swift is new. I have not tested it at all. One thing I question about the above code is how do the bounds check work with a Swift array. If I asked for the value of names{101] , what would I get back? I know what the answer is in NSArray.

You mean something like this?

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post #94 of 104
True tone is not being abandoned. Notice that the hole for the flash is BIGGER than the standard single tone LEDs? They probably have some new design that embed both into the larger circle.
post #95 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
Personally, I wish Swift did even more by realizing that Tom, Dick, and Harry are single word strings and allowing me to omit the quotes unless it's required. For example, let me use...
Code:
let names = [Tom, Dick, Harry]

...or add the quotes if the string will have a space...
Code:
let names = [Tom, "Dick Applebaum", Harry]

Sure, Swift is smart but it isn't a mind reader. What if one of your array values is something that has either a constant, variable, keyword or method name already associated with it. You need uniformity and non ambiguous syntax. a string needs quotes, ALWAYS!

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post #96 of 104
Quote:

Yuck.

Yeah I know what you're saying. But a big iPhone? Who is it for? I'm thinking professionals rather than the average consumer. Professionals have different needs. I'm an artists and animator, and there is no way I can use all the great art and animation apps on the iPad without a fine pen tip. It's (pardon the pun) pointless. Or was it China that was big phone friendly? Anyways, come fall...

post #97 of 104
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post
But a big iPhone? Who is it for?

 

Morons.

 
I'm thinking professionals rather than the average consumer. Professionals have different needs.

 

Professionals are smart enough to use products that actually work. They need products that can be physically used. :lol:

 
I'm an artists and animator, and there is no way I can use all the great art and animation apps on the iPad without a fine pen tip.

 

Is the proximity of touch points on the iPad at the same level as dedicated solutions yet?

post #98 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

Quote:
Yuck.
Yeah I know what you're saying. But a big iPhone? Who is it for? I'm thinking professionals rather than the average consumer. Professionals have different needs. I'm an artists and animator, and there is no way I can use all the great art and animation apps on the iPad without a fine pen tip. It's (pardon the pun) pointless. Or was it China that was big phone friendly? Anyways, come fall...

David Hockney managed to draw pretty well on the iPad with his finger.

Your skills are lacking.
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post #99 of 104

Nice big sample size you have there.

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post #100 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
Sure, but that was a huge annoyance for me when trying to learning Obj-C and also attempting to write it today. 

Talk about a huge annoyance… I was trying to listen to the Advanced Swift WWDC session. The presenter has such an annoying speech mannerism that I found it impossible to listen to more than 4-5 minutes. Aggravating.

 

Here is a link to my Obj-C guru, Simon A. on the latest WWDC Swift announcement.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GU-WguwovDE


Edited by mstone - 6/10/14 at 6:41pm

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post #101 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by airnerd View Post

Looks more like a cheaper version, iPhone 6c or something like that. It certainly looks cheap
This will leave all those 1st 3 gen iPhone cheap phone's in the dust, the climate has changed, now we need bigger screen for media, gaming, reading, web search etc.
this new form factor will leave all those toy phone consigned to the Apple Archives.
post #102 of 104
I hope Apple has a way to color that plumber's putty to the exact shade of the iPhone, or else they could see a run on the black model, on which you can hardly notice the breaks. I think those breaks look absolutely horrible, however many folks--including myself --won't care after they drop their iPhone in a case.
post #103 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric38 View Post

I hope Apple has a way to color that plumber's putty to the exact shade of the iPhone, or else they could see a run on the black model, on which you can hardly notice the breaks. I think those breaks look absolutely horrible, however many folks--including myself --won't care after they drop their iPhone in a case.

There was a set of pictures showing the 5S and the leak/mockup next to it:

http://www.macrumors.com/2014/06/11/jimmy-lin-iphone-6-mockup/

The first picture doesn't look too bad but the lines are pretty heavy. Some of the pictured models don't have logos, some have cutouts, the one there looks like the usual embossed logo in the first picture. The front camera is too high up again, which suggests it's more likely to be one of the Goophone models:



The Goophone clones have a larger front camera hole and it's up higher. Those guys mocked up the 5 before it was launched too. The Goophone looked similar to the 5 but it had seams where the 5 didn't:

http://gizmodo.com/5938613/chinas-already-knocking-off-the-iphone-5

They updated the design once the 5 came out. These models could well be based off design templates or descriptions of the actual iPhone 6 but not be entirely accurate representations. This one here has the rear camera overlapping the plastic surround:

http://bgr.com/2014/05/05/iphone-6-space-gray-leak/

Maybe it would look nicer if they used transparent plastic for the seams. That way, you'd see the metal color through it and it would blend in better. They'd just have to coat the inner edge to be opaque (maybe reflective) so that you couldn't see inside the phone. They might have to still use a tint of some kind to get the colors to blend right.
post #104 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by potatoman View Post

To everyone who says this is ugly and they love the 5 design, go back to 2012 and have a look at the leaked images of the unannounced iPhone 5. Majority of comments said it was ugly and they wouldn't buy it. Go back two more years, the same with the leaked iPhone 4 design. Have a little faith people, and prepare yourself because in another two years yet another 'ugly' design will leak and everyone will say they want the 'perfect' iPhone 6 to stay around.

This time next year the iPhone 5 will look clunky and old. Trust me. Who looks at an iPhone 4 these days and admires the beauty and level of detail the same as they did when it was the flagship?

 

Yep, this is an important point. The leaked images never really looked terribly good - we really have to see the final, polished design with complete fit and finish before we can make a judgment about it.

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