or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › Rumor: Apple to refresh iMac lineup next week with possible CPU speed boosts
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Rumor: Apple to refresh iMac lineup next week with possible CPU speed boosts

post #1 of 63
Thread Starter 
Apple is reportedly preparing to refresh the iMac lineup next week, though changes expected for the company's all-in-one desktop are thought to be minor component upgrades and processor speed boosts.

iMac


According to a report from French Apple blog MacGeneration, Apple will roll out new iMacs at the tail end of next week. Beyond the tentative date, the site's source -- who accurately predicted the recent MacBook Air update -- had no further information as to what the refresh will entail.

Without a big event or announcement, it is unlikely that a Retina display iMac will see release next week. Instead, the publication believes minor spec bumps like processor speed boosts are on tap, much like the recent MacBook Pro refresh in April.

Fanning the rumor flames, code discovered in a recent OS X 10.9.4 Mavericks beta references two unrecognized iMac models identified as "iMac15,1" and "iMac15,n." Since current iMacs carry the identifiers "14,1," "14,2," and "14.3," the unknown models are thought to be next-generation machines.

Intel also announced its Haswell product roadmap in April, which shows an average 100MHz speed bump for the CPUs used by Apple in the iMac lineup.

The purported launch timing lines up with predictions from analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who expects Apple to debut a low-cost iMac sometime this quarter.

Apple usually draws down supply of existing channel inventory with a new release, though it appears stock is at normal levels at this point. Current authorized reseller availability can be found on AppleInsider's Mac Price Guide.
post #2 of 63
So, all-new Mac Pros, updated specs on iMacs, but no love in at least eighteen months for the Mac mini? C'mon, Apple, what gives?! (Startin' to feel like a darn hobby.)
post #3 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragyn427 View Post

So, all-new Mac Pros, updated specs on iMacs, but no love in at least eighteen months for the Mac mini? C'mon, Apple, what gives?! (Startin' to feel like a darn hobby.)

 

Translation: nobody buys the Mac mini. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing for Apple. More expensive computer = more profit.

post #4 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post
 

 

Translation: nobody buys the Mac mini. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing for Apple. More expensive computer = more profit.

 

I'm pretty sure there are a significant number of customers like me. I was interested in dipping my feet into the Mac world and also to do some tinkering with iOS development and was not ready to fully commit to a desktop. I'm super happy with my Mac Mini as a secondary computer I'm sure I'm not the only one. I think it is relatively popular. It could be that Apple is simply resource constrained and that the Mac Mini is a lower priority product at this point if there is a lot of new stuff (as in new product categories) coming this fall...

 

People always seem to forget that Apple (similar to every other company in existence) does not have infinite resources.

post #5 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragyn427 View Post

So, all-new Mac Pros, updated specs on iMacs, but no love in at least eighteen months for the Mac mini? C'mon, Apple, what gives?! (Startin' to feel like a darn hobby.)

Just like the Mac Pros, which went stangant a long time before a complete redesign, I think Apple is planning to do something special with the mini. I would expect the next update to completely change the product, not just a spec boost.
post #6 of 63

Should not this thread be in Future Apple Hardware?

post #7 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

[...] much like the recent MacBook Pro refresh in April.
 

 

Why does a reference to the MacBook Pro link to a story about the MacBook Air?

 

PS. I want a new mini too.

Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

Audio Engineer

V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

Reply

Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

Audio Engineer

V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

Reply
post #8 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonteponte View Post
 

People always seem to forget that Apple (similar to every other company in existence) does not have infinite resources.

 

Exactly. I remember the software counterpart of this. Some years ago when iOS was under heavy development and Mac OS X was clearly neglected, there was word that the reason behind it was the reassignment of the company's developers. Over time, and once iOS reached enough maturity, some balance was established and now we are back at regular OS X updates.

 

Obviously I am only highlighting the limited resources effect. What will really happen with the mini is up to Apple.

post #9 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post


Just like the Mac Pros, which went stangant a long time before a complete redesign, I think Apple is planning to do something special with the mini. I would expect the next update to completely change the product, not just a spec boost.

 

I hope so. We don't know though how popular the mini is for Apple to proceed to a radical redesign. I would love to see a machine with more easily accessible internals, taking clues from the new Mac Pro.

post #10 of 63

Has Apple fasten its update/upgrade cycle. It seems speed bump is quicker then usual. ( Which is not necessary a bad thing )

So it now roughly 6 months every speed bump.

There are only two kind of people in this world.

Those who dont understand Apple and those who misunderstood Apple.

Reply

There are only two kind of people in this world.

Those who dont understand Apple and those who misunderstood Apple.

Reply
post #11 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post
 

 

Translation: nobody buys the Mac mini. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing for Apple. More expensive computer = more profit.


More like nobody with any sense buys an 18 month+ computer at full price..... Once they refresh it the sales will come.

iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
post #12 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksec View Post
 

Has Apple fasten its update/upgrade cycle. It seems speed bump is quicker then usual. ( Which is not necessary a bad thing )

So it now roughly 6 months every speed bump.


They have been including more of the half generation refresh cycles, meaning cpu increases .1 ghz and possibly other small changes. They used to ignore many of these extremely minor spec bumps from intel. The gpu model on the Airs is slightly different, but I don't know what the performance difference is like. If they're refreshing imacs now, I doubt we'll see broadwell before early next year.

post #13 of 63

That is good newer improvements and the cost will go down.Good for Apple.

post #14 of 63
I for one am waiting for the new Mini, I use my mac mainly for web browsing so why would I need to spend $1300 on an iMac when the mini will do? Hell, depending on what they do to the mini I may just get an iPad and call it a day.
post #15 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post
 


They have been including more of the half generation refresh cycles, meaning cpu increases .1 ghz and possibly other small changes. They used to ignore many of these extremely minor spec bumps from intel. The gpu model on the Airs is slightly different, but I don't know what the performance difference is like. If they're refreshing imacs now, I doubt we'll see broadwell before early next year.

Yes that Broadwell will be roughly 6 months later. And big update Skylake another 6 months after that.

 

Which seems strange because essentially we get two jump within one year time frame.

 

And is it likely that Retina iMac will be based on one of those, since Broadwell gets a new GPU generation upgrade ( Which may not be enough ) and Skylake will have more GPU SP as well as better CPU core.

There are only two kind of people in this world.

Those who dont understand Apple and those who misunderstood Apple.

Reply

There are only two kind of people in this world.

Those who dont understand Apple and those who misunderstood Apple.

Reply
post #16 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksec View Post

Has Apple fasten its update/upgrade cycle. It seems speed bump is quicker then usual. ( Which is not necessary a bad thing )
So it now roughly 6 months every speed bump.

It's hard to constantly update your machines when there isn't much to update to.

If Apple were to release a Retina iMac with just a small increase in speed and the same or similar graphics, people would be bitching up a storm.

On another topic, I too think Apple has something in the works for the Mac mini. I still believe it will be smaller in design. There's teslly no need for it to be that large anymore. It's current size was mainly to accommodate an optical drive which is no longer included. Could this be the first Mac using an A9 chip??? I wonder if Apple is secretly optimizing Yosemite for their own processors along side of Intels?

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply
post #17 of 63

If it doesn't get a retina or 4K screen- NOT INTERESTED.

 
Where's the new Apple TV?
 
 
(So Y is the new X?   Zzzzzzzzzz......)
Reply
 
Where's the new Apple TV?
 
 
(So Y is the new X?   Zzzzzzzzzz......)
Reply
post #18 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post


On another topic, I too think Apple has something in the works for the Mac mini. I still believe it will be smaller in design. There's teslly no need for it to be that large anymore.

 

The Mac Mini was small when it was introduced, but the competition has caught up in form factor (Intel NUC, Gigabyte BRIX), so I'd think a redesign is in order (probably not as small as the Apple TV). The Mac Mini introduced me to Apple's desktop, and I know others that have bought it for the same reason, so I think it is still an important product. If you already have Windows hardware, all you need is a Mac Mini to get introduced to Apple.

post #19 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksec View Post
 

Yes that Broadwell will be roughly 6 months later. And big update Skylake another 6 months after that.

 

Which seems strange because essentially we get two jump within one year time frame.

 

And is it likely that Retina iMac will be based on one of those, since Broadwell gets a new GPU generation upgrade ( Which may not be enough ) and Skylake will have more GPU SP as well as better CPU core.

I don't expect intel will release one architecture 6 months after the other, even if they say delays in one won't affect the next. They almost never give it less than a year. They say one thing. It changes a few months later. You'll see articles about delays and other random news later on. The current gpus can technically handle 4K. It's more a matter of drivers. I could see them going to integrated only on more machines to cut costs with a retina model.

post #20 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by formosa View Post

The Mac Mini was small when it was introduced, but the competition has caught up in form factor (Intel NUC, Gigabyte BRIX), so I'd think a redesign is in order (probably not as small as the Apple TV). The Mac Mini introduced me to Apple's desktop, and I know others that have bought it for the same reason, so I think it is still an important product. If you already have Windows hardware, all you need is a Mac Mini to get introduced to Apple.

I don't see it being as small as the AppleTV, but I could see it being about the size of the USB SuperDrive (only taller). That would be significantly smaller and impressive, especially if they can keep the power supply internal.

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply
post #21 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonteponte View Post
 

It could be that Apple is simply resource constrained and that the Mac Mini is a lower priority product at this point if there is a lot of new stuff (as in new product categories) coming this fall...

 

People always seem to forget that Apple (similar to every other company in existence) does not have infinite resources.

 

Oh, but Apple is not similar to every other company!  Apple is the largest!  And with $100B+ of free cash, there is virtually no project Apple couldn't tackle.  From another perspective, Sammy can continue pumping out dozens of phone models per year, and still keep updating their TVs, kitchen appliances, automobiles, etc.  So I just don't buy the argument that Apple is resource-constrained.  Rather, I think Apple is just moving deliberately, on its own schedule, working to ensure continued product value.  And the Mini is supposed to be a "switcher" device, but it's turned out that iOS is a better "switcher engine", so I'm not surprised that Apple has decided to let the sleeping dog lie for a while.

post #22 of 63
I have found the mac mini to be the best Apple solution for small to mid sized businesses. Why put extra money into larger than needed screens for checkouts. Set up internal server to connect the units and away you go. Very practical and efficient. Integrate the iPad or iPhone with them and your off and running.
post #23 of 63
Apple is certainly creating a lot of pent-up demand for the Mac mini by stretching out the refresh period this time! When it does come (probably Broadwell equipped in the fall) I think it's going to sell like hotcakes! And not just to all of us who have been waiting for it for so long now. I think they will probably inaugurate a new push for the general public, now that iOS devices are so popular among "non-Apple" people. Crossover time is ripe right now, and even more so in the fall with all the new goodies coming. A re-designed, smaller box with possibly AppleTV functionality built-in, and games, would sell like crazy to said public. They would eat it up. I think Apple is not neglecting it at all, but is crazy like a fox, and intent on truly maximizing sales, in the run-up to Christmas, of a brand-new, greatly enhanced machine. Or so we can hope...!
post #24 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post
 

 

So I just don't buy the argument that Apple is resource-constrained.

 

The meaning of the resources argument, from my point of view at least, is not financial. Obviously there is ample cash to spend. The point is that Apple does not want to spend for such reasons. They proved it years ago, as I mentioned before, in the case of the pair OS X - iOS development. They had already tons of new cash each year in order to expand their developer teams, if they wanted to. Instead, they chose to move developers around according to the needs. They always try to push the available human resources to their limit. But this may mean delays and neglect for products that are not in the front line.

post #25 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post


I don't see it being as small as the AppleTV, but I could see it being about the size of the USB SuperDrive (only taller). That would be significantly smaller and impressive, especially if they can keep the power supply internal.

The Mini:  I see it as being in the same footprint as the Airport Extreme, but 1/2-1/3 the height.  Maybe even a 1/2 cylinder of a Mac Pro, utilizing some of the cooling technologies... or even be passive cooling.    It can't be too small, as it will need 2 antenna to be an effective 802.11ac receiver.

 

I see the superdrive being an add-on.  Apple will forge ahead with the 'all content is streaming content' design.

post #26 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by PB View Post

The meaning of the resources argument, from my point of view at least, is not financial. Obviously there is ample cash to spend. The point is that Apple does not want to spend for such reasons. They proved it years ago, as I mentioned before, in the case of the pair OS X - iOS development. They had already tons of new cash each year in order to expand their developer teams, if they wanted to. Instead, they chose to move developers around according to the needs. They always try to push the available human resources to their limit. But this may mean delays and neglect for products that are not in the front line.

This is more like it, seems to me. Keep focus, move like a start-up, stay nimble. Eddy Cue and Jimmy Iovine were recently backing up this idea

Plus, good engineers don't grow on trees, and money can't buy everything.
post #27 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by PB View Post
 

 

The meaning of the resources argument, from my point of view at least, is not financial. Obviously there is ample cash to spend. The point is that Apple does not want to spend for such reasons. They proved it years ago, as I mentioned before, in the case of the pair OS X - iOS development. They had already tons of new cash each year in order to expand their developer teams, if they wanted to. Instead, they chose to move developers around according to the needs. They always try to push the available human resources to their limit. But this may mean delays and neglect for products that are not in the front line.

 

Perhaps there is a specialized business usage of the term "resource constrained" that I'm not aware of. I was only reading from a laymans perspective.  But what you're describing, PB, is a choice, not a constraint, IMO.  Similarly, if I choose to spend my weekends at the beach instead of mowing my lawn, it's not a resource constraint.  It's a resource restraint.  It's a choice.  My neighbors might not like it, but like Apple, I have my priorities, which include gas money for the beach, but not for gardeners.  :)

post #28 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post
 

If it doesn't get a retina or 4K screen- NOT INTERESTED.

I wouldn't go as as far as saying not interested, but I don't see them releasing an iMac with Retina/4K without an 'event'

 

I feel this will be a '.5' upgrade

new CPU new graphics

Fusion Drive as the base drive.  

HDMI 1.4ultra output

same price.

 

Current units drop in price, significantly if you're an educational buyer (that's the correct timing for Back to School sales).

post #29 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post


It's hard to constantly update your machines when there isn't much to update to.

If Apple were to release a Retina iMac with just a small increase in speed and the same or similar graphics, people would be bitching up a storm.
 

but they would bumping up against their Mac Pro low end.... I can't see a $1300 Retina iMac with Mac Pro like graphics. They will use the top of the line Haswell aligned Intel Graphics and something less than a D300 chipset as an upgrade.

 

Apple's upgrade path here is to build out the obsolescence curve for future OSX releases, maintain a cost/performance envelope <$1500, and align with the market in terms of components and features.

 

[...] Could this be the first Mac using an A9 chip???
 
I wonder if Apple is secretly optimizing Yosemite for their own processors along side of Intels?

No.  Makes no sense.   That sort of announcement would be made at WWDC.  Developers need to be the first to know.

 

No.  

Well, Maybe.  But not in the way you think.

 

Switching to Swift allows them rejigger their entire compiler stack.  Other than the deepest bowels of the kernel, all OSX/iOS frameworks will port to Swift over time, and that portation will optimise the common core set of frameworks, as well as develop a Intel/Aseries optimized LLVM.

post #30 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post
 

So I just don't buy the argument that Apple is resource-constrained.  Rather, I think Apple is just moving deliberately, on its own schedule, working to ensure continued product value.  And the Mini is supposed to be a "switcher" device, but it's turned out that iOS is a better "switcher engine", so I'm not surprised that Apple has decided to let the sleeping dog lie for a while.

Apple has always been modestly staffed; they are very careful about who they hire, they simply won't grab some random schmuck walking down De Anza Boulevard to fill up a chair.

 

Here's what we know: iPhones and iPads have dominated both unit sales and overall company revenue for many years (Macs are an increasingly smaller part of the revenue pie). We also know that notebooks are around 75% of total Mac unit sales. In 2013, Apple sold about 7 million Macs, so let's say that there were 2 million Mac desktops sold. We don't know the exact breakdown of sales per model type, but let's say that 75% of desktop Macs were iMacs (a number which I believe to be higher) but for the sake of this analysis, we'll say 500,000 Mac desktops are either Mac minis or Mac Pros.

 

That's not a lot of boxes.

 

My hunch is that Apple has a Mac Desktop engineering team that splits time between the Mac Pro and the Mac mini (and possibly to the iMac, although the latter product line has enough sales to probably merit a separate team). Things that the team learns from working on the Mac Pro can be applied to the mini, and vice versa. It makes no sense for Apple to run two fully independent teams on product lines that have such small sales. There is a good chance that the team that designed the new Mac Pro is working on the next generation Mac mini as we speak, and will switch back to the Mac Pro. Unlike the notebooks and the iMac which have some motivation to ship for the "back to school" sales season, that is not really the case for the Mac mini nor Mac Pro. Sure, there are deadlines for that team, but the deadlines don't correspond to a typical release cycle which is why Mac Pro started shipping a few units at the end of last year.

 

Apple has not gone a wild hiring spree for Mac engineers, so one might deduce that management is relative satisfied with the pace of new Mac products in their pipeline.


Edited by mpantone - 6/11/14 at 8:01am
post #31 of 63
Hello,


Does anyone have any idea what kind of GPU they will use for the new high end model? I hope they stick to nvidia. As a 3D artist, nvidia is a priority now, I use CUDA software.

Maybe GTX 880M... It's the fastest mobile GPU with 8 GB + low power consumption which make sane for the slim design.

I just ordered the current model but the credit was not yet approved. So I have a little door open for the new one. What do you think? Should I wait for the new one or should I continue with the current one?
post #32 of 63
Maybe Apple will redesign the mini as Mac Mini with Beats.
post #33 of 63
Okay, after having some time to re-read things again (and view everyone else's helpful comments), I too think (hope!) that Apple has grand plans for the mini. That said, a minor refresh in the meantime would be appreciated. The base-level iMac had a perfectly-decent quad-core i5 with Iris Pro graphics, and I've no doubt that, if this config turned up in the next Mac mini refresh, there'd be many interested buyers, myself included.
post #34 of 63

Count me as another who has been patiently waiting for a refreshed MacMini for a full year now. :???: I already have a keyboard, mouse and monitor. I just need a Mac that's well under the $1k threshold, but is powerful and has tons of memory. I don't need an iMac. The MacBook is out of my price range. The MacAir doesn't quite cut it for me (I have an iPadAir instead). The MacMini is perfect (with max'ed out RAM and large HD space), great price point,  and it's small enough to be portable.

 

:rolleyes: Patiently waiting, Apple… patiently waiting… *sigh*

post #35 of 63
Retina iMac, I buy.
No Retina, no sale.
post #36 of 63
A Touch ID sensor embedded behind the Apple logo please
post #37 of 63
A mini that would do double-duty as an AppleTV would be pretty cool. Throw in a digital TV antenna for local programming and DVR functionality and we've got something.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #38 of 63
Looking forward to the new Imac. I still a have my 2008 Model. Recently added a 1 tb HD. Looking forward to Yosemite.
post #39 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post
 

 

Translation: nobody buys the Mac mini. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing for Apple. More expensive computer = more profit.


That's ridiculous. The Mac mini is the most affordable Mac, and can still be upgraded after purchasing. The iMac is locked down, and overpriced.

 

I am anxiously awaiting a new Mac mini and it is ridiculous that is hasn't even been spec-bumped. RIDICULOUS.

post #40 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ Web View Post

Retina iMac, I buy.
No Retina, no sale.


I agree. I have no reason to buy an iMac without a Retina Display.

 

I'm much happier with a fast Mac mini and whatever 1080p display(s) I choose. As long as the 21.5" is still 1080p like every other 21.5" monitor I have no incentive to get an iMac over a Mac mini.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Current Mac Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › Rumor: Apple to refresh iMac lineup next week with possible CPU speed boosts