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Priceline to buy Apple partner OpenTable for $2.6 billion

post #1 of 64
Thread Starter 
Online travel behemoth Priceline has struck a deal that will see it pay $2.6 billion for OpenTable, a provider of online reservation technology for restaurants that underpins Siri's table booking functionality.

Siri's OpenTable integration in iOS 6, left, and iOS 7, right.
Siri's OpenTable integration in iOS 6, left, and iOS 7, right.


Priceline will pay $103 per share -- a $29 premium over the stock's June 12 closing price -- for OpenTable in the all-cash acquisition. Executives from both companies touted Priceline's ability to help OpenTable as the latter attempts to expand into foreign markets.

"We look forward to helping the OpenTable team accelerate their global expansion, increase the value offered to their restaurant partners, and enhance the end-to-end experience for our collective customers across desktop and mobile devices," Priceline CEO Darren Huston said.

OpenTable chief Matt Roberts echoed the sentiment, calling out Priceline's "exceptional track record of customer service in dozens of languages around the world."

Apple integrated OpenTable into Siri beginning with iOS 6, allowing the personal digital assistant to help iPhone owners make restaurant reservations. It is unclear how the Priceline agreement, which is expected to close in the third quarter of this year, may affect OpenTable's relationship with Apple.
post #2 of 64
Apple buys Priceline? ;-)
post #3 of 64

When I see this kind of thing, I realize I live in a very different world than some people. I couldn't tell you the last time I went to a restaurant that even had reservations. 

 

Also, that's almost the cost of the Beats transaction.

post #4 of 64
I'm sorry but I would never have Siri make a dinner reservation for me. I wouldn't even THINK to do so.

The mistake they made with Siri is that it could do niche tasks like this before it could do something as simple as open an App on your phone.

They haven't built enough trust in Siri to perform the simple tasks, so advanced tasks like "Make a reservation" or "Buy me tickets" are way out of people's perception of what it can do.
post #5 of 64
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Originally Posted by pmz View Post

I'm sorry but I would never have Siri make a dinner reservation for me. I wouldn't even THINK to do so.

The mistake they made with Siri is that it could do niche tasks like this before it could do something as simple as open an App on your phone.

They haven't built enough trust in Siri to perform the simple tasks, so advanced tasks like "Make a reservation" or "Buy me tickets" are way out of people's perception of what it can do.
You don't know much about Siri. It was always able to open apps. In fact this was a feature of the OS before Siri, just like playing a song by voice. There were many other voice commands that were not on by default as well under accessibility options. Opening apps and songs was on by default. I used it all the time.
post #6 of 64

A billion here. A billion there. Pretty soon you're talking about real money.

post #7 of 64

What surprises me the most about this acquisition is that Priceline has this much money. This is the same as Amazon have a tons of money, all they do is perform a service based on other company's products. In other words, they don't really have anything of true value. Priceline doesn't actually rent any hotel rooms or provide any airline tickets, they merely find a service that sells them for the cheapest. How many middleman services do we need and why do companies pay them so much in advertising to keep them in existence?

post #8 of 64
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Originally Posted by genovelle View Post


You don't know much about Siri. It was always able to open apps. In fact this was a feature of the OS before Siri, just like playing a song by voice. There were many other voice commands that were not on by default as well under accessibility options. Opening apps and songs was on by default. I used it all the time.


You don't know much about Siri. It was not able to open Apps, and was very limited in specific commands for the first and second year.

post #9 of 64

Yep, Siri couldn't open apps until iOS6.

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post #10 of 64
... and people are still concerned that Apple paid too much for Beats ... 1smile.gif
post #11 of 64
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Originally Posted by pmz View Post


You don't know much about Siri. It was not able to open Apps, and was very limited in specific commands for the first and second year.
Dude. I used the feature before Siri and continued to use it till this day. There are hundreds of undocumented feature in all Apple products. For instance people think that saying hey Siri is copying Google, but it has been a part of OS X which is what iOS is built on since 2001. Once turned on, you could have your mac listen for "computer" then a command for hands free control. They actually don't mention the fact that if you turn it on in settings that you have been able stream every purchase you ever made from the AppStore without having to download it since 2011. It now even supports playlist which it didn't at first.
post #12 of 64
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Originally Posted by genovelle View Post



Dude. I used the feature before Siri and continued to use it till this day. There are hundreds of undocumented feature in all Apple products. For instance people think that saying hey Siri is copying Google, but it has been a part of OS X which is what iOS is built on since 2001. Once turned on, you could have your mac listen for "computer" then a command for hands free control. They actually don't mention the fact that if you turn it on in settings that you have been able stream every purchase you ever made from the AppStore without having to download it since 2011. It now even supports playlist which it didn't at first.


Siri was not able to open Apps at launch. End of discussion.

post #13 of 64
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Originally Posted by genovelle View Post


Dude. I used the feature before Siri and continued to use it till this day. There are hundreds of undocumented feature in all Apple products. For instance people think that saying hey Siri is copying Google, but it has been a part of OS X which is what iOS is built on since 2001. Once turned on, you could have your mac listen for "computer" then a command for hands free control. They actually don't mention the fact that if you turn it on in settings that you have been able stream every purchase you ever made from the AppStore without having to download it since 2011. It now even supports playlist which it didn't at first.
http://www.macworld.com/article/1165635/get_siri_like_functionality_on_your_mac_with_speakable_items.html
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post #14 of 64

I use OpenTable all the time. It has always work perfectly. I have never used Siri to interface with OpenTable so I can't comment on that.

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post #15 of 64
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Originally Posted by rob53 View Post
 

What surprises me the most about this acquisition is that Priceline has this much money. This is the same as Amazon have a tons of money, all they do is perform a service based on other company's products. In other words, they don't really have anything of true value. Priceline doesn't actually rent any hotel rooms or provide any airline tickets, they merely find a service that sells them for the cheapest. How many middleman services do we need and why do companies pay them so much in advertising to keep them in existence?

I don't understand why you find this so surprising. What is so hard to understand? Priceline is an aggregator just like OpenTable. Totally valid business model.

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post #16 of 64
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Originally Posted by bluenix View Post

... and people are still concerned that Apple paid too much for Beats ... 1smile.gif

 

Dont think Apple paid too much at all. Beats basically dominates the headphone market, and headphones are the #1 accessory that almost everyone buys.

post #17 of 64
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Originally Posted by pmz View Post


Siri was not able to open Apps at launch. End of discussion.
It may have not been listed but unless I was just very lucky it worked. Maybe because I was using voice control already but it behaved like Siri. I even showed it off to people before they announced the feature in Siri. I thought it was odd that reviewers were claiming it was new when I had used it for long time. But believe what you want.
post #18 of 64
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Originally Posted by bluenix View Post

... and people are still concerned that Apple paid too much for Beats ... 1smile.gif

If Apple was buying OpenTable and it was started by an African-American rapper this article would be 300 posts deep by now mostly complaining about how Tim Cook should be fired and making racist comments about stereotypical foods.

What did OpenTable make in revenue and profits last year?
Edited by SolipsismX - 6/13/14 at 12:51pm

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post #19 of 64
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Originally Posted by pmz View Post
 
Siri was not able to open Apps at launch. End of discussion.

Surprisingly, although Siri can open apps, she can't close them. I discovered this recently when I was trying to get Siri to show me something on a map but she was such a miserable failure I said... just close maps. Sorry I can't close an app! Why the hell not? 

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post #20 of 64
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

What did OpenTable make in revenue and profits last year?
Looks like they did make a profit.
 

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post #21 of 64
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Originally Posted by bluenix View Post

... and people are still concerned that Apple paid too much for Beats ... 1smile.gif

I'll bet we won't see nearly as many articles about whether Priceline spent too much money for OpenTable as Apple spent on Beats or whether Priceline's CEO knows what the hell he's doing.  I'm fairly certain Priceline is taking far more risk than Apple did but where's all the second-guessing about this deal.  Of course, Priceline gets a free pass unlike Apple because the hedge funds are completely enamored with Priceline.  Priceline has about $7 billion cash and is spending $2.6 billion on OpenTable.  Apple has $150 billion in cash and spent $3 billion on Beats.  So where's all the cries of criticism, anguish and doubts about the Priceline/OpenTable deal.  Not a peep.  I find the bias against Apple's acquisitions rather absurd and puke-worthy.

post #22 of 64
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

If Apple was buying OpenTable and it was started by an African-American rapper this article would be 300 posts deep by now mostly complaining about how Tom Cook should be fired and making racist comments about stereotypical foods.

What did OpenTable make in revenue and profits last year?

Interesting that you're the one that brings this up. So any criticism is just construed as racism? It's untrue and you're better than that Solip. You can prove a point without having to pull a race card. Please call me a racist- I'm married to a 100% Hispanic woman and have two daughters- one biological that is half white/Hispanic and the other is adopted and half black.

The criticism with Beats was that it didn't appear to have much synergy outside of beats music- which turned out to be a much bigger deal than was first suspected. Also an acquihire- which was fine.
But to suggest opentable is dumb because it doesn't have a profit (which they do)- I counter with- How much profit did Siri have? How about any of the dozen map apps apple has acquired over the last few months. Those have synergies. To simply look at revenue and profit is ridiculous. Hell- Phillips probably makes a profit. And they make apple chargers, docks, speakers, and headphones. Why not buy them? They're profitable. Or iHome?

I still think Apple didn't give a rat about beats headphones and is just gonna let that product category sit over in the corner and do whatever they want in the same fashion as FileMaker. They might do something with the earbuds later on, but it likely won't be anything groundbreaking. The headphones are nice to have, but if Beats music, iovine, and dre weren't part of the $3.2b deal, it wouldn't have been bought. Even for 1 billion.
Edited by Andysol - 6/13/14 at 10:10am

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post #23 of 64
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Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

I'll bet we won't see nearly as many articles about whether Priceline spent too much money for OpenTable as Apple spent on Beats or whether Priceline's CEO knows what the hell he's doing.  I'm fairly certain Priceline is taking far more risk than Apple did but where's all the second-guessing about this deal.  Of course, Priceline gets a free pass unlike Apple because the hedge funds are completely enamored with Priceline.  Priceline has about $7 billion cash and is spending $2.6 billion on OpenTable.  Apple has $150 billion in cash and spent $3 billion on Beats.  So where's all the cries of criticism, anguish and doubts about the Priceline/OpenTable deal.  Not a peep.  I find the bias against Apple's acquisitions rather absurd and puke-worthy.

I think anytime a publicly traded company spends 40% of their cash- it's insane. You're exactly right, $3b was a drop in the bucket for Apple. If I were a major analyst, I wouldn't have laid that much credence into it, honestly, but as an apple fan- I like to have knowledge and an opinion of every purchase, major or minor. Of course Everyone will have an opinion on Apple- because there is so much love/hate on it. Outside of investors, who gives a rats balls about Priceline? Unless there's a pricelineinsider,com I don't know of 1biggrin.gif

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post #24 of 64
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Originally Posted by pmz View Post

I'm sorry but I would never have Siri make a dinner reservation for me. I wouldn't even THINK to do so.

The mistake they made with Siri is that it could do niche tasks like this before it could do something as simple as open an App on your phone.

They haven't built enough trust in Siri to perform the simple tasks, so advanced tasks like "Make a reservation" or "Buy me tickets" are way out of people's perception of what it can do.

I use it to make reservations on occasion and it works well, the OpenTable CEO sent out an email stating that it would operate independently and function as before. 

post #25 of 64
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Originally Posted by rob53 View Post
 

What surprises me the most about this acquisition is that Priceline has this much money. This is the same as Amazon have a tons of money, all they do is perform a service based on other company's products. In other words, they don't really have anything of true value. Priceline doesn't actually rent any hotel rooms or provide any airline tickets, they merely find a service that sells them for the cheapest. How many middleman services do we need and why do companies pay them so much in advertising to keep them in existence?

My first reaction as well.

post #26 of 64

I can't wait for the "Name your own price" model to be applied to reservations at higher-end restaurants, where it can be a challenge to get a booking.  This will essentially allow the restaurants to auction off the seats, completely separately from the price of the meal.  Nifty!

post #27 of 64

It's expensive but totally complementary to Priceline's business. 

 

All of these services want to become sticky "one app does it all" services.   Priceline can book my flight, Car Rental, and Hotel now and in the future they'll be offering me the ability to create reservations for dinner.  

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post #28 of 64
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Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

Interesting that you're the one that brings this up. So any criticism is just construed as racism? It's untrue and you're better than that Solip. You can prove a point without having to pull a race card. Please call me a racist- I'm married to a 100% Hispanic woman and have two daughters- one biological that is half white/Hispanic and the other is adopted and half black.

Not any criticism but the Beats comments clearly showed that racism was a major factor for many posters.
Quote:
The criticism with Beats was that it didn't appear to have much synergy outside of beats music- which turned out to be a much bigger deal than was first suspected. Also an acquihire- which was fine.

No problem with having concerns but there is a problem with having concerns because of the color of someone's skin.
Quote:
But to suggest opentable is dumb because it doesn't have a profit (which they do)- I counter with- ]How much profit did Siri have? How about any of the dozen map apps apple has acquired over the last few months. Those have synergies. To simply look at revenue and profit is ridiculous.

I never suggested such a thing. I even did the same comparison to Siri and other other companies not making a profit when people were saying Beats is worthless.
Quote:
I still think Apple didn't give a rat about beats headphones and is just gonna let that product category sit over in the corner and do whatever they want in the same fashion as FileMaker. They might do something with the earbuds later on, but it likely won't be anything groundbreaking. The headphones are nice to have, but if Beats music, iovine, and dre weren't part of the $3.2b deal, it wouldn't have been bought. Even for 1 billion.

I think Apple cares very much about Beats's popularity and dominance of the headphone market. I don't see how anyone can think they'd want the 6 month old Beats Music for $3 billion. The numbers simply don't work out. They bought both companies for a reason and I don't think they were strong armed into it.

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post #29 of 64
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
Not any criticism but the Beats comments clearly showed that racism was a major factor for many posters.

I suspect you are correct, however there could be another circumstantial factor at work in the prejudice of some commenters.

 

Speaking strictly for myself, I have a negative impression of tatted-up hip-hop-gangster types whether they are black or white. I simply don't trust people like that and clearly that is the genre of music that Dre is into. On the other side of the spectrum I have equal respect for physicians, academics, public servants, and business professionals, etc. of any ethnicity. And by business professionals, I mean people who don't use foul mouthed hateful language as part of their business practices. Dre may be a business executive by some measure but he doesn't qualify by my definition. So perhaps there is a lot of similar sentiment giving cause to many of the negative comments on the Beats acquisition topic.

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post #30 of 64
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I suspect you are correct, however there could be another circumstantial factor at work in the prejudice of some commenters.

Speaking strictly for myself, I have a negative impression of tatted-up hip-hop-gangster types whether they are black or white. I simply don't trust people like that and clearly that is the genre of music that Dre is into. On the other side of the spectrum I have equal respect for physicians, academics, public servants, and business professionals, etc. of any ethnicity. And by business professionals, I mean people who don't use foul mouthed hateful language as part of their business practices. Dre may be a business executive by some measure but he doesn't qualify by my definition. So perhaps there is a lot of similar sentiment giving cause to many of the negative comments on the Beats acquisition topic.

I've never heard nor seen Bernie Madoff swear, listen to rap music, or wear hip-hop clothing, and since he's a business man does that make him a decent person?

I don't think having tattoos or being gay or of a certain religion or from a particular culture or economic class makes you any less moral or worse for the growth of a productive society.

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post #31 of 64
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Originally Posted by pmz View Post

I'm sorry but I would never have Siri make a dinner reservation for me. I wouldn't even THINK to do so.

The mistake they made with Siri is that it could do niche tasks like this before it could do something as simple as open an App on your phone.

They haven't built enough trust in Siri to perform the simple tasks, so advanced tasks like "Make a reservation" or "Buy me tickets" are way out of people's perception of what it can do.

 

you should try it before you knock it. Siri doesnt just make the rez in the background -- it brings up a prompt and you confirm it in the OpenTable table app, similar to confirming a text. its pretty simple, really.

post #32 of 64
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Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

Interesting that you're the one that brings this up. So any criticism is just construed as racism? It's untrue and you're better than that Solip. You can prove a point without having to pull a race card. Please call me a racist- I'm married to a 100% Hispanic woman and have two daughters- one biological that is half white/Hispanic and the other is adopted and half black.

 

youre making a strawman argument -- suggesting Solip said YOU made racist statements. he didnt say that. he said PEOPLE criticized the deal and made racist statements -- and they did. i read and argued w/ commenters on The Loop who said "what's next, a Glock w/ every headset?" etc... thats racism. because, you know, black consumers arent really all gangbanging thugs.

post #33 of 64
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
I've never heard nor seen Bernie Madoff swear, listen to rap music, or wear hip-hop clothing, and since he's a business man does that make him a decent person?

I don't think having tattoos or being gay or of a certain religion or from a particular culture or economic class makes you any less moral or worse for the growth of a productive society.

Good point about Madoff, but there is a reason why you don't see many hip-hop-gangster types in professional careers. I think it is because they appear untrustworthy and dangerous. Granted Madoff stole more money than all the gangsters combined but the gangster look, for some reason, just doesn't give people the impression of trust, and for me the distrust has nothing to do with race. I get the same exact impression from white Hell's Angel types.


Edited by mstone - 6/13/14 at 1:57pm

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post #34 of 64
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Good point about Madoff, but there is a reason why you don't see many hip-hop-gangster types in professional careers. I think it is because they appear untrustworthy and dangerous. Granted Madoff stole more money than all the gangsters combined but the gangster look, for some reason, just doesn't give people the impression of trust, and for me the distrust has nothing to do with race. 

You're not alone, but you're falsely attributing the culturally accepted attire and dress to an invalid notion of an individual's character. If Andre Young hasn't proven himself at this point to be both a successful entertainer and businessman I don't know what else to show to convince you otherwise but I will leave you with this idea (which I believe was from Robert X. Cringely's Triumph of the Nerds documentary) that Steve Jobs would negatively judge interviewees if they came in looking like they worked for IBM.


edit: It was a scene from Pirates of Silicon Valley. No idea on its authenticity but the point stands.

Edited by SolipsismX - 6/13/14 at 2:10pm

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post #35 of 64
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

You're not alone, but you're falsely attributing the culturally accepted attire and dress to an invalid notion of an individual's character. If Andre Young hasn't proven himself at this point to be both a successful entertainer and businessman I don't know what else to show to convince you otherwise but I will leave you with this idea (which I believe was from Robert X. Cringely's Triumph of the Nerds documentary) that Steve Jobs would negatively judge interviewees if they came in looking like they worked for IBM.

I wouldn't go so far as to say the hip-hop-gangster look is a culturally accepted norm, except perhaps among inmates. That is the origin of the style and it was adopted by gang members as a way to make others fear them. And that is the general impression that non-gangster style main stream society views them as.

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post #36 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
Not any criticism but the Beats comments clearly showed that racism was a major factor for many posters.

I suspect you are correct, however there could be another circumstantial factor at work in the prejudice of some commenters.

 

Speaking strictly for myself, I have a negative impression of tatted-up hip-hop-gangster types whether they are black or white. I simply don't trust people like that and clearly that is the genre of music that Dre is into. On the other side of the spectrum I have equal respect for physicians, academics, public servants, and business professionals, etc. of any ethnicity. And by business professionals, I mean people who don't use foul mouthed hateful language as part of their business practices. Dre may be a business executive by some measure but he doesn't qualify by my definition. So perhaps there is a lot of similar sentiment giving cause to many of the negative comments on the Beats acquisition topic.

 

Precisely.

 

It's just too easy to play the race card, as SolipsismX does. M&M is a famous white rapper, whose music and culture I find just as abhorrent as Dr. Dre's. Thuggishness is no respecter of race.

 

Gangster culture is intrinsically bad and should be destroyed for ever.

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post #37 of 64
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I wouldn't go so far as to say the hip-hop-gangster look is a culturally accepted norm, except perhaps among inmates. That is the origin of the style and it was adopted by gang members as a way to make others fear them. And that is the general impression that non-gangster style main stream society views them as.

1) Are you kidding? There are excessively large and profitable product lines that cater to that specific attire and look. Not being your norm is the same as not being a norm.

2) Are you kidding?! Inmates!!!!! You see a pic of Dr. Dre or Sean Combs or Beyonce and think they look like they belong behind bars? That's some whack shit!

3) You think $200 Nike Air Jordons were adopted by gang members as a way to make others fear them? You think that a gold chain (going back to the earl 80s) as a way to display wealth is to make other inmates fear them? You think that a puffy Sean John winter coat is way to make others fear them? HOW THE HELL ARE THEY GETTING THESE INTO THE PRISONS AND WHY WOULD ONE BE SCARED OF $200 SHOES?

4) Again, your general impression has an extreme bias with no sense of the reality of cultural trends.
Edited by SolipsismX - 6/13/14 at 2:29pm

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post #38 of 64
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Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

M&M is a famous white rapper, whose music and culture I find just as abhorrent as Dr. Dre's. Thuggishness is no respecter of race.

That's perfectly reasonable and not racist until you start making stupid claims like "All my black friends agree with me that rap isn't music and if you're not black you can't judge rap like they can."
Quote:
Gangster culture is intrinsically bad and should be destroyed for ever.

Define this gangster culture? Listening to rap music?

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post #39 of 64
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
 Are you kidding?! Inmates!!!!! You see a pic of Dr. Dre or Sean Combs or Beyonce and think they look like they belong behind bars? That's some whack shit!

Not that I know who Sean Combs is but certainly not Beyonce. As far as Dre is concerned I have seen pictures of him where he looks like a frat boy and I don't know if he even has a tattoo but my original reference was to the type of music he produces which seems to exclusively support the gangster mode.

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post #40 of 64
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Not that I know who Sean Combs is but certainly not Beyonce. As far as Dre is concerned I have seen pictures of him where he looks like a frat boy and I don't know if he even has a tattoo but my original reference was to the type of music he produces which seems to exclusively support the gangster mode.

And what "mode" did Elvis and Johnny Cash promote? Every generation there are is a minority of people that are shocked by the natural changes in music despite the clarity in which the new has grown out of the old. I suspect there is some mental condition, perhaps similar to how it's harder to learn a language as your older when many get to a certain age the music (and culture which is highly associated with music) gets locked into place making it very difficult for certain people to even see how other music and attire can be appealing. I bet if you take someone from Wall Street today and put them in 17th century France they will look comical without the wigs and frilly garb.




PS: Tim Roth is the best villain ever in Rob Roy… despite his "professional' and "respectable" attire.
Edited by SolipsismX - 6/13/14 at 2:44pm

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