or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › New York Times seeks to profile Tim Cook after getting shut out by Apple
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New York Times seeks to profile Tim Cook after getting shut out by Apple - Page 2

post #41 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

The NYT has gone from respectable paper to hit whore like the rest, making up crap for ad money. Not a shock Apple cut them off.

 

There is no accountability with journalism, stock analysts, etc. on the internet. Imagine if each of these blowhards got a rating for their work over their career. Imagine what Gene Munster's rating would be.

post #42 of 133
I'm not saying anything derogatory about Apple, just stating the fact that they haven't developed anything different than when Jobs was the helm. Everything they've done have been spec bumps. One can't even argue with new Mac Pro as all it was was a radical redesign!

If you guys don't see the history repeating itself now from the last absence of Jobs, I highly recommend researching it a little. They need to continue breaking into new markets and growing that way. They aren't meant to be #1 in any particular slice of the industry, lateral expansion is the only way for long term success. They are not doing it (yet, hopefully).
post #43 of 133
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post
Jeez, Cook could sneeze in a napkin and a lot of you would applaud.

 

Eh, I've seen greener phlegm.

 
Listen, I'm not saying anything derogatory about Apple...

 

Lies aren't derogatory now?

 
...just stating the fact that they haven't developed anything different than when Jobs was the helm.

 

And in what 5D branch of our 7D treed universe is this a fact, exactly? Because it certainly isn't in ours.

 
 If you guys don't see the history repeating itself now from the last absence of Jobs, I highly recommend researching it a little. 

 

Oh, the irony.

 
They need to continue breaking into new markets and growing that way.

 

I'd love for you to tell us how they're not doing that, but I doubt you could even come up with the "can't prove a negative" cop out.

 
They aren't meant to be #1 in any particular slice of the industry, lateral expansion is the only way for long term success.

 

Despite having always been a vertical company. :no::???::wow: 

post #44 of 133
The truth is that it would in fact be hard for Apple to come up with the next huge thing even if Steve Jobs was still here and in perfect health. iPhone is so big it is Apple. ipad a distant 2nd and macs, ipods, Apple TV, app store, itunes all a very very distant almost rounding error 3rd.

Even Steve Jobs was the steward of Apple TV and that on its own sold enough to generate a few billion in revenue which if that was my company or most it would be fantastic. Under huge Apple it doesn't even move the needle. Apple in this regards is a victim of its huge success.

I believe iWatch will be like Apple TV. It may generate a couple billion but like Apple TV, macs, ipods it will amount to just a rounding error.

Apple is running out of room for growth as it all has to come from iphone upgrades now. iPads are in decline as noted in last quarter so some of the air pocket will be taken up by iphone 6 but after the big screen megacycle is over I fear another huge one is not coming. Just the regular steady flat to slow decline iphone upgrade cycle which gets longer and longer plus margin pressure as decent competitors price at $0 on contract (i.e. Samsung S5 is $99 right now on upgrade or 2 year contract and by time iPhone 6 launches Samsung will go to $0).

Tim Cook is doing a fine job running the company but to expect him to pull a Steve Jobs iphone or ipad rabbit out of his hat is asking alot. Even Steve Jobs (remember Apple TV) may not have been able to do one big enough to move the needle. We'll never know for sure but something to think about.
post #45 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by daveinpublic View Post

It seems like many sites are negative towards Apple. Not sure why.

 

The Media needs to make money. So, they will print whatever their sponsors (advertisers, paid articles) want them to write.

 

Do you believe the media hates Apple? No they don't. They just have to write these stories because they are paid for it.

post #46 of 133
My Mother has always been a big fan of the NYTimes. I have subscribed for a short while, but never seemed to get enough to warrant the high cost. Last time I cancelled they kept sending us papers and bills for 3 months.

NY Times is dying and this weak journalism is strong evidence of how painful their situation has become. We need strong journalists to keep an open society. This is not a good thing, but it is real.
post #47 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

Jeez, Cook could sneeze in a napkin and a lot of you would applaud. Listen, I'm not saying anything derogatory about Apple, just stating the fact that they haven't developed anything different than when Jobs was the helm. Everything they've done have been spec bumps. One can't even argue with new Mac Pro as all it was was a radical redesign!

If you guys don't see the history repeating itself now from the last absence of Jobs, I highly recommend researching it a little. They need to continue breaking into new markets and growing that way. They aren't meant to be #1 in any particular slice of the industry, lateral expansion is the only way for long term success. They are not doing it (yet, hopefully).

Weak sauce arguments. No other company is held to the same "innovate or doom" standard that people like you claim to be Apple's exclusive fate. If none of the evolutionary improvements Apple has done since 2010 matches the standard of "good enough to avoid doom" what does that say about the Googles and the Samsungs of the world? They didn't invent the modern smartphone or tablet. Google's last innovation was PageRank. Everything else is monkey see, monkey do. Yet only Apple must "innovate or doom." Why? Oh that's right: you hold the copycats to a lower standard of "copy Apple's formula fast or doom."

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #48 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Weak sauce arguments. No other company is held to the same "innovate or doom" standard that people like you claim to be Apple's exclusive fate. If none of the evolutionary improvements Apple has done since 2010 matches the standard of "good enough to avoid doom" what does that say about the Googles and the Samsungs of the world? They didn't invent the modern smartphone or tablet. Google's last innovation was PageRank. Everything else is monkey see, monkey do. Yet only Apple must "innovate or doom." Why? Oh that's right: you hold the copycats to a lower standard of "copy Apple's formula fast or doom."
I'm no fan of Google but to say their last innovation was page rank? Seriously? That's like saying Apple's last innovation was the GUI.
post #49 of 133
NYTimes Brian Chen and Matt Richtel must be fans of Fox News. They aspire to be like Sean Hannity and Glenn Beck.
post #50 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Steinberg View Post

Daniel, great piece as always, which is why we cherish your appearances on my radio show, The Tech Night Owl LIVE.

Interesting that the NY Times "reporters" never mentioned iOS 8 or Yosemite. To them, WWDC was all about Swift, though the name isn't mentioned, and Health (not HealthKit).

But the Times also hired Molly Wood, formerly of CNET, as a tech contributor. She never met a fact she couldn't mangle. And I speak from experience, having worked with her at CNET. She mangled one of my articles as well and ignored me when I asked her to correct the piece.

Peace,
Gene Steinberg
www.technightowl.com

Gene, love your show

Molly is the worst. Her attempted iMessage takedown article couple of weeks back was riddled with errors. The editor added a note to that effect, but then they removed it from the article. NY Times tech is a joke

Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

Reply

Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

Reply
post #51 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I'm no fan of Google but to say their last innovation was page rank? Seriously? That's like saying Apple's last innovation was the GUI.
Edit: was supposed to be a reply to SuddenlyNewton

Of course I hold Apple to a higher standard lol. But tell me, what have they done since the ipad? Sure they can coast that ride for a while but why? They have the ability to expand out but they're not doing it- why not? And if you want to compare Apple to Google as far as innovation, you might wanna read up on some of their projects like driverless cars and asteroid mining.
Listen, all I'm saying is that Apple isn't the Willy Wonka of the tech world anymore. They're now the new Ford- they started the car game and released the Mustang and that's been pretty much it since. Is that what you want from Apple? I sure as hell don't. I want them to get their hands into just about everything physical in the world and do it right. It's a shame you guys don't feel that way, instead you wanna keep making excuses for them.
post #52 of 133
So true. We must remember those who control NY Times. They don't believe in "fair and balanced" news. I'm going to enrage many, but my ex, my former father-in-law and 2 very close friends worked for Steve Jobs and he was unpleasant and volatile to put it it mildly. He was a visionary; that is true, but he was dependent on those who actually did the tech work. He would fire people at will, calling then names that I won't repeat. His "two weeks notice" became "okay, consider yourself fired two weeks ago. There's your two weeks notice". Tim Cook is taking a beating from all sides and I'm tired of the "if Steve Jobs was there...." Because it's not fair to the employees, who worked around the clock for many of Jobs visions" which never panned out. He was one of the driving forces behind Apple, but he had a lot of help in developing the iPod, iPhone and computers. There are many former employees who became the object of the infamous Steve Jobs "wrath" and some of his actions were unconscionable. Apple has continued to make superior products with Tim Cook at the helm. Give credit where credit is due. And frankly, I'd no more read the NY Times than cover my phone with Hello Kitty decals.
post #53 of 133

Great editorial!!!

Wonder if Richtel and Chen own Apple stock and if they're trying to manipulate the price.

post #54 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

Being "disappointed" is a relative perception and not really something you can measure with pure numbers.  A company being measured by meeting or failing to meet "expectations" is another relative thing that can't be measured, but this is how Apple is being measured by the news media and Wall Street.  Even having more than enough can certainly make humans feel disappointed.  It's hard for me to understand how Wall Street can be disappointed with the most valuable publicly traded company on the planet by a huge amount.  It doesn't quite make sense if you measure the numbers, but yet the feelings of disappointment still exist in an overbearing way.  People still argue that Tim Cook isn't doing "enough" for Apple and "investors".  I suppose it's all a matter of greed that causes Apple to be considered a disappointment or failing to meet expectations.  I'm sure it can't be much more than that because Apple's actual financial numbers should be considered impressive to practically anyone.  They're huge numbers unless you compare them to the number of stars in the sky or grains of sand on a beach.

Whether Steve Jobs could have done better than Tim Cook we will never know but as Apple stands now, as a company, it still looks pretty impressive to me.  However, I've learned to temper my expectations and look at Apple compared to most tech companies and Apple doesn't seem to come up short to any of them.

Oh god, Odo, weren't you the guy who was constantly ragging on Tim Cook for not doing enough to please Wall Street and thus causing AAPL to tank? There you were, post after off-topic post, screeching about how Apple's stock price has fallen so far and how it is all Tim's fault. Well, look at you now! The voice of level-headed reason, running interference for Mr. Cook, as if the old shrill Odo never even existed. I might vomit.

Aah, but then again, the original Constable Odo was a shape shifter of remarkable ability.
post #55 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

But tell me, what have they done since the ipad?.

LOL

Does anyone want to take the time to post the hundreds, if not thousands, of industry leading advancements Apple has made since the iPad in 2010?

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #56 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

LOL

Does anyone want to take the time to post the hundreds, if not thousands, of industry leading advancements Apple has made since the iPad in 2010?

No, but I'll post the one that haters get upset about. The A7 processor - the worlds most advanced mobile ARM processor that's so far ahead of Samsung and Qualcomm that even one year later they're still behind. Even ARM's own high-end 64bit processor (the A57) is inferior to the A7, and it's not even shipping yet.

NOBODY in mobile is even close to Apple in processor design.
post #57 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

No, but I'll post the one that haters get upset about. The A7 processor - the worlds most advanced mobile ARM processor that's so far ahead of Samsung and Qualcomm that even one year later they're still behind. Even ARM's own high-end 64bit processor (the A57) is inferior to the A7, and it's not even shipping yet.

NOBODY in mobile is even close to Apple in processor design.

I've seen several trolls posts CPU comparison tests that show that the A7 isn't that good. They use CPUs that are clocked about 2x as fast to say, "See, the A7 is just marketing" and I truly think some of them think Apple couldn't use a higher-clockrate and not one of them ever compares performance per Watt.

And that's one item. From the complexity to Touch ID's secure enclave on the A7 to increased security being simple for the user (a very, very rare thing) to the recent announcements of the various Hand Off and Continuity features of iOS 8 and Yosemite Apple has done amazing things.

I think what the trolls have trouble with is not being able to understand that innovation doesn't necessarily mean a new product category, which is ironic because in 2010 they said the iPad was just a big iPod Touch.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #58 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

No, but I'll post the one that haters get upset about. The A7 processor - the worlds most advanced mobile ARM processor that's so far ahead of Samsung and Qualcomm that even one year later they're still behind. Even ARM's own high-end 64bit processor (the A57) is inferior to the A7, and it's not even shipping yet.

NOBODY in mobile is even close to Apple in processor design.
Have the consumers actually seen the benefit of this yet (besides Touch ID, assuming 64-bit is required for that)? Are their things my iPad can do that it couldn't if it wasn't 64-bit? Unfortunately at the iPad event last year Apple didn't really explain the advantages of 64-bit. Maybe this year is when we'll really see the benefits. Right now, I wish 64-bit could keep Safari tabs from reloading all the time. 1smile.gif
post #59 of 133
I guess the crap coming from the NYT in some ways fits their Yellow Peril version of a reborn Cold war. They lump every Asian manufacturer from India to Japan into their hate and fear China campaign. So, even though Apple isn't the heaviest investor in Chinese industry by any stretch of the imagination - they are one of the best known. Courtesy, I guess, of hacks like Richtel and Chen.

Not certain how they expect to benefit over the next few years of decline they're locked into - but, desperate managers generally rely on what they know how to do - even when it hasn't worked before.
post #60 of 133

Here's a far more accurate title for the NYT story:

New York Times does hatchet job on Tim Cook after getting shut out by Apple

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #61 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by BertP View Post
 

I have to agree, that the NYT article on Tim Cook's stewardship of Apple, was terrible. Basically, the authors did not appreciate how significant WWDC 2014 really was, in terms of software development: especially the iOS and OS X extensions newly available to third-party developers, the new 'Continuity' features, and not even a mention of the new system language called Swift.

 

Instead, the authors fell back on commentators of dubious technical experience, such as financial analysts, who mostly just don't get that technical innovation is mostly evolutionary, and much more rarely of 'paradigm shift' importance. No one can call up technical improvements on a regular schedule; it is inherently an uneven set of improvements over time.

 

John Gruber recently made a point, which I paraphrase here…that Tim Cook has, in fact, improved Apple, by enhancing collaboration between Apple's internal groups…with the removal of fiefdoms (including Scott Forestall's iOS fiefdom). WWDC 2014 reflects well this new level of collaboration, and the CEO deserves to be credited for it.

 

yes Gruber filed a very thoughtful post - "Only Apple" - about Cook and Apple on Friday:

 

http://daringfireball.net/2014/06/only_apple

 

his post is an infinitely better analysis of both than the drivel from the NYT hacks.

 

the real question is what has happened at the NYT. did it all begin with the hack "stenographic reporting" by Judy Miller a decade ago that very much helped launch a totally bogus war that cost Trillion$ and a hundred thousand innocent lives?

 

Arthur Sulzberger Jr. has been the NYT Publisher since 1992. maybe the fish rots at the head.

post #62 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Unfortunately at the iPad event last year Apple didn't really explain the advantages of 64-bit.

1oyvey.gif

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #63 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

No, but I'll post the one that haters get upset about. The A7 processor - the worlds most advanced mobile ARM processor that's so far ahead of Samsung and Qualcomm that even one year later they're still behind. Even ARM's own high-end 64bit processor (the A57) is inferior to the A7, and it's not even shipping yet.

NOBODY in mobile is even close to Apple in processor design.
Have the consumers actually seen the benefit of this yet (besides Touch ID, assuming 64-bit is required for that)? Are their things my iPad can do that it couldn't if it wasn't 64-bit? Unfortunately at the iPad event last year Apple didn't really explain the advantages of 64-bit. Maybe this year is when we'll really see the benefits. Right now, I wish 64-bit could keep Safari tabs from reloading all the time. 1smile.gif

No, an iPhone 5 can do everything a 5S can do. But after iPhone 6 or 6s is released, the vast bulk of Apple iPhones will be running 64-bit processors, and then anything released that will need the 64-bit processor will run on it. This way Apple will not be accused of orphaning users, and developers will have an installed based to write for. This solves the age old chicken and egg problem with regards to platforms vs developers.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #64 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

No, an iPhone 5 can do everything a 5S can do.

That's not even remotely accurate. There are massive changes in HW and performance between the iPhone 5 and 5S.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #65 of 133

What a lazy, deceitful, superficial article published by a rag publication that's circling down the drain. Tim has proven the skeptics, haters, and liars wrong time and time again- and he'll continue to do so. 

post #66 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


Have the consumers actually seen the benefit of this yet (besides Touch ID, assuming 64-bit is required for that)? Are their things my iPad can do that it couldn't if it wasn't 64-bit? Unfortunately at the iPad event last year Apple didn't really explain the advantages of 64-bit. Maybe this year is when we'll really see the benefits. Right now, I wish 64-bit could keep Safari tabs from reloading all the time. 1smile.gif

 

Yes there are. Not a huge number, but there are 64bit Apps that can perform functions any A6 or earlier processor equipped device cannot. And that doesn't change the fact the A7 is the fastest, most advanced ARM processor out there.

 

Of course it will take time to move to 64bit, but Apple will do this in record time (compared to Windows and even Mac OS). This fall Apple will likely no longer sell any 32bit devices (except perhaps in emerging markets) and developers will start releasing 64bit only Apps (as opposed to combined 32/64bit Apps that will run on either type of device). By fall 2015 (a time span of only 2 years since the A7 came out) Apple will be completely 64bit. All new Apps will be 64bit and the only 32bit Apps left will be the ones Apple allows to remain to support older devices (meaning Apple will allow updates to existing Apps, but will no longer accept NEW Apps that are 32bit).

 

I'll post this again since it's still relevant:

 

 

Apple's A7 completely destroys both Samsung and Qualcomm processor cores. The ONLY reason Samsung and Qualcomm processor perform similarly to an A7 is because they are clocked far higher and they have twice the cores.

 

Really quite pathetic how far behind they are compared to Apple.

post #67 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Really quite pathetic how far behind they are compared to Apple.

Remember after the PA Semi purchase certain people said it was laughable for Apple to think they make a better chip.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #68 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Remember after the PA Semi purchase certain people said it was laughable for Apple to think they make a better chip.

 

Don't forget Intrinsity for chip design, Anobit for flash controllers and Passif for low power semiconductors.

 

I don't think any of them are laughing now. They're just lucky Apple doesn't sell their processors to other OEM's. Which reminds me of a strange dream I had the other day that Apple signed a deal with Microsoft to use A Series processors in their Windows Phones.

post #69 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Which reminds me of a strange dream I had the other day that Apple signed a deal with Microsoft to use A Series processors in their Windows Phones.

Strategically that could be a great move. Apple can make more money off their chip IP while lowering per chip cost for their iDevices, which may help WinPh gain additional ground at the expense of Android.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
post #70 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Strategically that could be a great move. Apple can make more money off their chip IP while lowering per chip cost for their iDevices, which may help WinPh gain additional ground at the expense of Android.

Interesting idea.  Can't see it ever happening with all the history between these two companies..

Save your friends from Skynet - whoops, Google.  Recommend they use StartPage for search..

...and no, I am not paid to say this..

Reply

Save your friends from Skynet - whoops, Google.  Recommend they use StartPage for search..

...and no, I am not paid to say this..

Reply
post #71 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Right now, I wish 64-bit could keep Safari tabs from reloading all the time. 1smile.gif

 

I believe that's a RAM issue...

post #72 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

Jeez... blah, blah, blah

 

I notice you didn't answer my earlier question regarding the 64bit A7 and all the software that works with it.

 

So apart from Apple where can I buy a functioning phone with a 64bit processor and OS?

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #73 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

Of course I hold Apple to a higher standard lol. But tell me, what have they done since the ipad? Sure they can coast that ride for a while but why? 

 

If someone could have watched WWDC 2014 and then concluded that Apple has been "coasting", I don't know what to say.

 

Also, your statement of they should "get their hands on everything physical in the world and do it right" encapsulated your mind-numbing ignorance of what it takes to "get something right"- which is time, and focus. 

 

There has been hundreds of innovations at Apple since the days of SJ, in both hardware and software, many of which Apple's competitors are not even close to touching. It's extremely sad that you choose to be too blind to see that, and instead define progress by your misguided idea of "expanding" senselessly and as quickly as possible into random markets- and nothing else counts, hence your "what have they done?" drivel. If there ever was a route to doom, that would be it. 

post #74 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post
 

 

Yes there are. Not a huge number, but there are 64bit Apps that can perform functions any A6 or earlier processor equipped device cannot. And that doesn't change the fact the A7 is the fastest, most advanced ARM processor out there.

 

Of course it will take time to move to 64bit, but Apple will do this in record time (compared to Windows and even Mac OS). This fall Apple will likely no longer sell any 32bit devices (except perhaps in emerging markets) and developers will start releasing 64bit only Apps (as opposed to combined 32/64bit Apps that will run on either type of device). By fall 2015 (a time span of only 2 years since the A7 came out) Apple will be completely 64bit. All new Apps will be 64bit and the only 32bit Apps left will be the ones Apple allows to remain to support older devices (meaning Apple will allow updates to existing Apps, but will no longer accept NEW Apps that are 32bit).

 

I'll post this again since it's still relevant:

 

 

Apple's A7 completely destroys both Samsung and Qualcomm processor cores. The ONLY reason Samsung and Qualcomm processor perform similarly to an A7 is because they are clocked far higher and they have twice the cores.

 

Really quite pathetic how far behind they are compared to Apple.

 

And now consider the fact that we'll have the A8 in a couple months, which will smoke the A7 out of the water. Apple's skill with CPU architecture seems to be increasing at an exponential rate with each revision, something that should be downright terrifying for everyone else. Nevermind Touch ID, another critical component that noone else seems close to matching in terms of reliability and ease of use. 

post #75 of 133
The New York Times has "reporters" who are creating clearly false and skewed articles about Apple.

I think the New York Times needs to shore up its ethics and fire these "reporters".
post #76 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

No, but I'll post the one that haters get upset about. The A7 processor - the worlds most advanced mobile ARM processor that's so far ahead of Samsung and Qualcomm that even one year later they're still behind. Even ARM's own high-end 64bit processor (the A57) is inferior to the A7, and it's not even shipping yet.

NOBODY in mobile is even close to Apple in processor design.
Have the consumers actually seen the benefit of this yet (besides Touch ID, assuming 64-bit is required for that)? Are their things my iPad can do that it couldn't if it wasn't 64-bit? Unfortunately at the iPad event last year Apple didn't really explain the advantages of 64-bit. Maybe this year is when we'll really see the benefits. Right now, I wish 64-bit could keep Safari tabs from reloading all the time. 1smile.gif

No, an iPhone 5 can do everything a 5S can do. But after iPhone 6 or 6s is released, the vast bulk of Apple iPhones will be running 64-bit processors, and then anything released that will need the 64-bit processor will run on it. This way Apple will not be accused of orphaning users, and developers will have an installed based to write for. This solves the age old chicken and egg problem with regards to platforms vs developers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

No, an iPhone 5 can do everything a 5S can do.

That's not even remotely accurate. There are massive changes in HW and performance between the iPhone 5 and 5S.

Pray tell me what app an iPhone5 cannot run that iPhone 5s can run? Hmm??

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #77 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

No, but I'll post the one that haters get upset about. The A7 processor - the worlds most advanced mobile ARM processor that's so far ahead of Samsung and Qualcomm that even one year later they're still behind. Even ARM's own high-end 64bit processor (the A57) is inferior to the A7, and it's not even shipping yet.


NOBODY in mobile is even close to Apple in processor design.
Have the consumers actually seen the benefit of this yet (besides Touch ID, assuming 64-bit is required for that)? Are their things my iPad can do that it couldn't if it wasn't 64-bit? Unfortunately at the iPad event last year Apple didn't really explain the advantages of 64-bit. Maybe this year is when we'll really see the benefits. Right now, I wish 64-bit could keep Safari tabs from reloading all the time. 1smile.gif
No, an iPhone 5 can do everything a 5S can do. But after iPhone 6 or 6s is released, the vast bulk of Apple iPhones will be running 64-bit processors, and then anything released that will need the 64-bit processor will run on it. This way Apple will not be accused of orphaning users, and developers will have an installed based to write for. This solves the age old chicken and egg problem with regards to platforms vs developers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

No, an iPhone 5 can do everything a 5S can do.


That's not even remotely accurate. There are massive changes in HW and performance between the iPhone 5 and 5S.
Pray tell me what app an iPhone5 cannot run that iPhone 5s can run? Hmm??

The iPhone 5 doesn't have Touch ID. That means that not only do you lose that convenience, but that when all the new apps that enable it in the coming year arrive, you won't be able to either. I'd say that's a big deal and a compelling reason to buy the iPhone 5s or 6.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
post #78 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post
 

No, an iPhone 5 can do everything a 5S can do. 

Not as fast.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #79 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

No, but I'll post the one that haters get upset about. The A7 processor - the worlds most advanced mobile ARM processor that's so far ahead of Samsung and Qualcomm that even one year later they're still behind. Even ARM's own high-end 64bit processor (the A57) is inferior to the A7, and it's not even shipping yet.


NOBODY in mobile is even close to Apple in processor design.
Have the consumers actually seen the benefit of this yet (besides Touch ID, assuming 64-bit is required for that)? Are their things my iPad can do that it couldn't if it wasn't 64-bit? Unfortunately at the iPad event last year Apple didn't really explain the advantages of 64-bit. Maybe this year is when we'll really see the benefits. Right now, I wish 64-bit could keep Safari tabs from reloading all the time. 1smile.gif
No, an iPhone 5 can do everything a 5S can do. But after iPhone 6 or 6s is released, the vast bulk of Apple iPhones will be running 64-bit processors, and then anything released that will need the 64-bit processor will run on it. This way Apple will not be accused of orphaning users, and developers will have an installed based to write for. This solves the age old chicken and egg problem with regards to platforms vs developers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

No, an iPhone 5 can do everything a 5S can do.


That's not even remotely accurate. There are massive changes in HW and performance between the iPhone 5 and 5S.
Pray tell me what app an iPhone5 cannot run that iPhone 5s can run? Hmm??

The iPhone 5 doesn't have Touch ID. That means that not only do you lose that convenience, but that when all the new apps that enable it in the coming year arrive, you won't be able to either. I'd say that's a big deal and a compelling reason to buy the iPhone 5s or 6.

 

Well, of course, but presently, as I stated, the two phones are equal in what they can do. As someone pointed out, "but not as fast," however the topic wasn't performance, but capability.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #80 of 133

Actually, the topic was benefit/advantage.  Speed is a benefit/advantage.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › New York Times seeks to profile Tim Cook after getting shut out by Apple