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post #41 of 54
I really don't think it's going to be a square like the Galaxy Gear or upcoming LG watch. They aren't going to just make the ipod Nano bound to a watchband. It will be something more classy and futuristic, like a band with a flexible display, battery and circuitry where the top of the band IS the watch.
post #42 of 54
I wonder if that many sensors would be feasible from a cost/ battery life standpoint.
post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moreck View Post

I wonder if that many sensors would be feasible from a cost/ battery life standpoint.
I would suspect several of them will be consolidated into a low-power chip. For example, the M7 co-processor be considered 3 sensors since it's a gyroscope, accelerometer and compass?

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post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

Think of all the self-diegnostic tools people could use, and how this would change healthcare. 

Yes. Imagine a week after the iWatch comes out, news stories about thousands of people finding out they have diabetes who didn't know.

post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post
 

Yes. Imagine a week after the iWatch comes out, news stories about thousands of people finding out they have diabetes who didn't know.

 

Your sarcasm is lost with the knowledge that could save their lives. Although, I don't believe glucose levels would be readable without blood. 

 

My dad had diabetes, and died two months ago due to congestive heart failure. Symptoms were attributed to his diabetes. I wonder, and hope, if wearable medical devices 5-10 years from now will be able to help prevent misdiagnosis. 

 

Of course, if it is one from Microsoft...

"Oh my gosh, oh my gosh!!  My Windows Watch just blue screened! IT JUST BLUE SCREENED, what does that mean?!!!!" 

 

LOL 

post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

 

Your sarcasm is lost with the knowledge that could save their lives. Although, I don't believe glucose levels would be readable without blood. 

I wasn't being sarcastic. Apple have recently hired some people with expertise in non-invasive glucose testing: http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/07/18/rumored-apple-hires-from-medical-sensor-field-could-hint-at-iwatch-capabilities

post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I wasn't being sarcastic. Apple have recently hired some people with expertise in non-invasive glucose testing: http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/07/18/rumored-apple-hires-from-medical-sensor-field-could-hint-at-iwatch-capabilities

I don't think I have diabetes or that I'm at risk but I've made an appt. with my doctor for a full body physical that will include getting checked for any signs of diabetes.

I'm sure we've all heard that preventative health care measures are very important in saying money and saving lives. Out of site, out of mind s very real in keeping us from considering potential issues and solutions so I do feel that a device that can record, measure and analyze some basic trends in your body's functionality can lead to better longterm heath, less missed work, and a generally better quality of life.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post
 

I wasn't being sarcastic. Apple have recently hired some people with expertise in non-invasive glucose testing: http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/07/18/rumored-apple-hires-from-medical-sensor-field-could-hint-at-iwatch-capabilities

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I don't think I have diabetes or that I'm at risk but I've made an appt. with my doctor for a full body physical that will include getting checked for any signs of diabetes.

I'm sure we've all heard that preventative health care measures are very important in saying money and saving lives. Out of site, out of mind s very real in keeping us from considering potential issues and solutions so I do feel that a device that can record, measure and analyze some basic trends in your body's functionality can lead to better longterm heath, less missed work, and a generally better quality of life.

I feel that Raman spectroscopy looks very promising - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raman_spectroscopy. There is scope for miniaturisation in this technique and a Raman spectrometer can sample tiny volumes, non-invasively, very accurately. Just not sure about detector sensitivity~integration time. One day, Raman spectrometry in miniature form will make a splash.

 

All the best.

Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #49 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

I feel that Raman spectroscopy looks very promising - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raman_spectroscopy. There is scope for miniaturisation in this technique and a Raman spectrometer can sample tiny volumes, non-invasively, very accurately. Just not sure about detector sensitivity~integration time. One day, Raman spectrometry in miniature form will make a splash.

All the best.

I've mentioned it for a couple years on here but I think the biometrics "wearables" market will eventually evolve into devices that we have implanted into our skin as well as inexpensive pills we take daily to help monitor our systems. They will automatically and securely send data back to a device it's paired with (sub dermal, iWatch, whatever) and that will have plenty of detailed info that a more powerful competing device will then be able to analyze and compare over a duration as well as against others to find trends that no physician could possibly see by simply having you go in for a routine checkup and occasional blood work.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I'm sure we've all heard that preventative health care measures are very important in saying money and saving lives. Out of site, out of mind s very real in keeping us from considering potential issues and solutions so I do feel that a device that can record, measure and analyze some basic trends in your body's functionality can lead to better longterm heath, less missed work, and a generally better quality of life.

Yes, I think it could be very promising. There would be an initial surge of hospital admissions as a lot of people found out they had something they didn't know about, and that might temporarily overload things, but in the long run it would be much better having things caught early.


Edited by ascii - 6/21/14 at 12:55pm
post #51 of 54
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I've mentioned it for a couple years on here but I think the biometrics "wearables" market will eventually evolve into devices that we have implanted into our skin as well as inexpensive pills we take daily to help monitor our systems. They will automatically and securely send data back to a device it's paired with (sub dermal, iWatch, whatever) and that will have plenty of detailed info that a more powerful competing device will then be able to analyze and compare over a duration as well as against others to find trends that no physician could possibly see by simply having you go in for a routine checkup and occasional blood work.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post
 

Yes, I think it could be very promising. There would be an initial surge of hospital emissions as a lot of people found out they had something they didn't know about, and that might temporarily overload things, but in the long run it would be much better having things caught early.

I hope (and trust) that Apple gets this right because the thought of Google led health monitoring is truly frightening. We could well be living through an historic epoch in the emergence of a new industry.

Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #52 of 54

Who needs health monitoring now that we have free Obamacare?

 
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post #53 of 54
I’m not sold on the idea of a digital watch. They have always been naff.

I love watches, and you don’t need to spend much to get a beautiful one. What’s the point in Apple making one?

The history of watches is not like the history of mobile phones. Mobile phones started out as huge bricks—no one misses those—and became the sleek slabs we have now. Watches started out beautiful, and some turned ugly with the digital age. Thankfully, it’s still very easy to buy a fine watch.

I would love it if Apple could do one of three things:

Incorporate additional functionality into a traditional, mechanical timepiece. Sensors, mobile payments, whatever—but with no display.

Overlay a digital interface onto a traditional watch. The watch functions like a normal watch for telling the time; the watch itself is painstakingly crafted like any number of existing watches in all its clockwork glory. But at a touch of the sapphire protection, a digital interface can be imposed to offer extra utility.

A wearable with no display.
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
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post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

I’m not sold on the idea of a digital watch. They have always been naff.

I love watches, and you don’t need to spend much to get a beautiful one. What’s the point in Apple making one?

The history of watches is not like the history of mobile phones. Mobile phones started out as huge bricks—no one misses those—and became the sleek slabs we have now. Watches started out beautiful, and some turned ugly with the digital age. Thankfully, it’s still very easy to buy a fine watch.

I would love it if Apple could do one of three things:

Incorporate additional functionality into a traditional, mechanical timepiece. Sensors, mobile payments, whatever—but with no display.

Overlay a digital interface onto a traditional watch. The watch functions like a normal watch for telling the time; the watch itself is painstakingly crafted like any number of existing watches in all its clockwork glory. But at a touch of the sapphire protection, a digital interface can be imposed to offer extra utility.

A wearable with no display.

That sounds like some digital/Steampunk hybrid for some nonexistent Jobs-Vernes era.

I see no future where Apple would wast time, money, weight, space, and functiionality to use mechanical gears simply so you can see them behind a cryatal. Where is tge benefit to a CE company?

The only way I see moving parts being used are for tactile feel, like with the Home Button, or for counterweight for winding or self-winding devices, which I don't think are feasible.
Edited by SolipsismX - 6/22/14 at 2:46pm

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