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First look: Siri gains smart home controls with HomeKit in iOS 8 - Page 2

post #41 of 54
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... leveraging the ability of the iOS voice-driven personal assistant Siri to allow users to control the temperature, lights, locks and other accessories in a modern "smart home."

 

Great.  But what I really want is far simpler: a secure BTLE hotel door key feature.

Unlocks when I walk up to the door and touch the handle.  

Locks when the door is closed and I start walking down the hallway.

 

Actually, house door locks could work the same way.  No need to talk to Siri for that.

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post #42 of 54

Wonder if Piper will support it then?

post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by robotstorm View Post
 

Wonder if Piper will support it then?

 

From "Orange Is The New Black"?

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post #44 of 54

"Apple has also baked remote access into its system, which ensures users will be able to check whether they locked the front door or closed the garage — and fix it if they didn't — when they are away from home."

 

How is this possible? Either your HomeKit database would need to live in the cloud and all your HomeKit devices would need access to the internet, OR you'd need some always-running iOS device sitting at home to execute the commands. Yes, I'd love it if HomeKit could be running on my AppleTV and broker all these transactions while I'm away from home, but something tells me this statement in the article is false.

post #45 of 54
Originally Posted by Lightbow View Post

How is this possible? Either your HomeKit database would need to live in the cloud and all your HomeKit devices would need access to the internet, OR you'd need some always-running iOS device sitting at home to execute the commands. Yes, I'd love it if HomeKit could be running on my AppleTV and broker all these transactions while I'm away from home, but something tells me this statement in the article is false.

 

The latter is silly. The former is how all smart appliances work, anyway. The only thing out on anyone’s server would probably be the network location to call out to when a device requests a specific home.

post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

The whole "looking into your lights" etc response is a bit crap and makes little sense, now if the response "I will look to do this for you" or "I will look into this, please wait" that'd be fine.

"Siri, close my windows."
"I'm looking into your windows."
1eek.gif
post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 
Originally Posted by Lightbow View Post

How is this possible? Either your HomeKit database would need to live in the cloud and all your HomeKit devices would need access to the internet, OR you'd need some always-running iOS device sitting at home to execute the commands. Yes, I'd love it if HomeKit could be running on my AppleTV and broker all these transactions while I'm away from home, but something tells me this statement in the article is false.

 

The latter is silly. The former is how all smart appliances work, anyway. The only thing out on anyone’s server would probably be the network location to call out to when a device requests a specific home.

 

I was thinking about how the networking is going to be configured. Considering that most people have dynamic IP and firewalls automatically configured on their wireless routers, there are only a few ways that I can think of where you can monitor and modify your appliances from a remote location.

 

Right now each manufacturer provides a service whereby the device is connected to the home wifi to access the Internet through which it contacts the company's server. Because the device is on a private network it can't be accessed directly from outside, so it continually polls the server to see if it has any messages. If it has a message it executes the requested task. 

 

I am thinking that with HomeKit Apple will require an Apple AirPort router that contains functionality similar to Back to My Mac which allows out of network remote access to traverse the firewall, dynamic IPs and DHCP wireless to gain direct access to the home appliance. You would probably open up the router configuration settings and enter the Apple IDs of the people who are allowed access and to which appliances.


Edited by mstone - 6/22/14 at 9:43am

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post #48 of 54
"Users won't even need to be on the same Wi-Fi network to access and control their HomeKit accessories. Apple has also baked remote access into its system, which ensures users will be able to check whether they locked the front door or closed the garage - and fix it if they didn't - when they are away from home."

I wonder if this will be wonderful or awful for those of us who have obsessive-compulsive disorder.
post #49 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
I was thinking about how the networking is going to be configured.  ...

 

I went back and reviewed the video of the HomeKit session at WWDC (free developer id required).  At the 4:50 mark, it is emphatically stated that you'll be able to control your HomeKit accessories even when not at home.  No explanation is given for how this magic will work.   Right after, security and privacy controls are stressed.

 

My guess is that iCloud must play some role but I'm not enough of a networking guy to speculate on how your remote iOS device communicates with individual accessories within your home, securely.  Does each Made for iOS HomeKit accessory have enough networking smarts built-in to register with iCloud and your AppleID?  The MFi program is under non-disclosure agreements so we may have to wait for iOS 8 roll-out to find out how this is implemented.

 

Craig

post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvr4me View Post
Indeed.  Some of the most obvious applications of home automation are time based:  "turn on the outside lights at 20 minutes after sunset and turn them off at 11:15 pm".   I want to set that up as a rule and have it applied every day...not tell Siri every night!

 

Either Apple's HomeKit is really just voice-activated remote control OR other things are going to be possible that haven't been publicly announced yet.  I hope it is the latter.

 

Replying to myself, but...

 

The video of the HomeKit session at WWDC, starting at 33:15, describes "Action Sets" and "TimerTriggers".  An action set is an arbitrary list of actions (close garage door, lock front door, turn off outside lights) given a name ("bedtime").  iOS waits for the condition specified in the TimerTrigger and then, in the background, executes the associated Action Set.  No Siri or foreground HomeKit app required.  

 

TimerTriggers may be set up to recur but I haven't found an overview of what sort of recurrence rules are possible.  I assume that everything that the Calendar can do now would be supported--eg weekday rules different from weekends, etc.

 

Craig

post #51 of 54
Has anyone said what hardware protocol (if any) they would favor?

I'm still using (prehistoric) X-10, which is (generally) fine for turning lights on and off, although not exactly as robust as it should be. I'd move on, but there are so many (incompatible?) hardware protocols out there - Lynx, Z-wave, Zigbee, etc - I'd either like someone like Apple to pick a winner, or guarantee that my iDevices could control any of them (which seems un-Apple like).
post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdq2 View Post

Has anyone said what hardware protocol (if any) they would favor?

I'm still using (prehistoric) X-10, which is (generally) fine for turning lights on and off, although not exactly as robust as it should be. I'd move on, but there are so many (incompatible?) hardware protocols out there - Lynx, Z-wave, Zigbee, etc - I'd either like someone like Apple to pick a winner, or guarantee that my iDevices could control any of them (which seems un-Apple like).

For turning on and off lights I guess I'm considered prehistoric as I prefer ARM. And by that I mean actually using my arm to manually turn lights on and off as I need them. 1biggrin.gif

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post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdq2 View Post

Has anyone said what hardware protocol (if any) they would favor?

I'm still using (prehistoric) X-10, which is (generally) fine for turning lights on and off, although not exactly as robust as it should be. I'd move on, but there are so many (incompatible?) hardware protocols out there - Lynx, Z-wave, Zigbee, etc - I'd either like someone like Apple to pick a winner, or guarantee that my iDevices could control any of them (which seems un-Apple like).

 

They say there will be Bridges but there were no details on which protocol(s) would be bridged.  From the description of the HomeKit software, the bridge makes its connected accessories look/act just like 'proper' Made for iOS HomeKit accessories.  Very cool and the accessories will respond to Siri voice commands!

 

ZWave, Insteon, Zigbee, APB...who knows.  Just my guess, but I don't think X-10 is reliable enough to make the cut.  Sorry.

 

Craig

post #54 of 54

Is Homekit going to be compatible with existing Honeywell thermostats, Philips bulbs, Yale door locks, etc or is this aimed at future products only? The lack of information from Apple and others on this is very frustrating. Should we not make any purchases until iOS 8 is released?

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