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Weather Channel providing Apple more detailed data for iOS 8 Weather app than Yahoo did - Page 2

post #41 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post
 

Something like 7% of all California freshwater usage is used for landscaping. 77% is used for agriculture. Moving water is ridiculously energy intensive. 20% of total electrical power is used to move water in California through things like the CA Aqueduct.

I know it is just a 'pipe' dream. Moving water from flood areas would never work because it comes too fast. It would require massive drainage projects to capture it fast enough to help mitigate the damage. It just makes me crazy to see so much unwanted water and snow on the TV news when California needs it so badly. 20% electricity cost is nothing compared to having all vegetation die and having huge fire fighting costs.

 

The logical thing is instead of moving tons of water from wet areas, you move the finished food. But try to explain that to "local farming" global warming tree-huggers.

 

 

We just need rain. It has nothing to do with political ideology. The notion of forsaking California as a dispensable food producing region and instead trucking in finished food from elsewhere is completely naive. California is responsible for around 15% of the total US agricultural production and much of their products are not produced anywhere else.

 

Edit: Found this

 

Ranks first in total agricultural production.
Ranks first in total crops production.
Ranks second in total livestock & livestock product production.
Ranks first in production of almonds (100% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of avocados (96% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of broccoli (92% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of celery (93% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of dairy products (20% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of grapes (91% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of greenhouse/nursery (21% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of hay (14% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of lemons (89% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of lettuce (71% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of onions (31% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of peaches (54% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of pistachio nuts (100% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of plums (97% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of strawberries (83% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of tomatoes (53% of U.S. production).
Ranks first in production of walnuts (100% of U.S. production).


Edited by mstone - 6/21/14 at 12:00pm

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post #42 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 
 California is responsible for around 15% of the total US agricultural production and much of their products are not produced anywhere else.

 

We can do without California's products. The economics of farming in California (expensive water and cheap migrant labor) mean that we grow cash crops which are often exported. Example: avocados, wine grapes, strawberries, nursery plants and orchids (#4 by value). The common theme is that they are all labor-intensive and don't benefit yet from automation. "Real" food, like grains, are grown in the midwest.

post #43 of 69
The funny thing is I have been using yahoos separate weather app and hidden the included one and it has all the capabilities (including map and 10 day forcast, barometer, feels like) of the one being trumpeted by IOS8. Everyone is a little late to the party.
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post #44 of 69
So true!
post #45 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 
 California is responsible for around 15% of the total US agricultural production and much of their products are not produced anywhere else.

 

We can do without California's products. The economics of farming in California (expensive water and cheap migrant labor) mean that we grow cash crops which are often exported. Example: avocados, wine grapes, strawberries, nursery plants and orchids (#4 by value). The common theme is that they are all labor-intensive and don't benefit yet from automation. "Real" food, like grains, are grown in the midwest.

You mean the states that receive 80% of the farm subsidies which are largely paid by California. California pays 300 billion to the federal government in taxes, the highest of any state, where the the states producing grains and receiving the farm subsidies pay the least. Sounds fair.

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post #46 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

You mean the states that receive 80% of the farm subsidies whicht are largely paid by California. California pays 300 billion to the federal government in taxes, the highest of any state, where the the states producing grains and receiving the farm subsidies pay the least. Sounds fair.

 

California is the #1 recipient in farm subsidies via water, often through financing of water projects. If you look at the numbers, something like $60 Billion/decade in taxpayer funds go to that 77% agricultural water system, which is a large fraction of "traditional" farm subsidies.

 

Farmers buy water far cheaper than anybody else as a result. Our local water usage rates (infrastructure use like pipes are flat-rate and billed separately), for 100 cu ft: Normal $5.12, Reclaimed $2.69, Agricultural from city water $1.38, Ag from canals $1.26. Why the difference? Taxpayer subsidies.

post #47 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post
 

California is the #1 recipient in farm subsidies via water, often through financing of water projects. If you look at the numbers, something like $60 Billion/decade in taxpayer funds go to that 77% agricultural water system, which is a large fraction of "traditional" farm subsidies.

 

Completely wrong. California water projects are 80% financed by bonds and not the taxpayers. The federal government contribution is minimal and allocated for flood control. You need to 'look' at the numbers.

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post #48 of 69


Still more accurate than Yahoo!. Now if you’ll excuse me, my house is about to be blown away.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #49 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Completely wrong. California water projects are 80% financed by bonds and not the taxpayers. The federal government contribution is minimal and allocated for flood control. You need to 'look' at the numbers.

 

Completely wrong. Look at Prop 84.

  • Authorizes $5,388,000,000 in general obligation bonds to fund projects and expenditures, to be repaid from the state’s General Fund.
  • State cost of about $10.5 billion over 30 years to pay off both the principal ($5.4 billion) and interest ($5.1 billion) costs on the bonds. Payments of about $350 million per year.

General fund = taxpayer dollars. If the projects weren't to use general taxpayer dollars, it would be repaid by the project.

 

Federal aid comes from US Bureau of Reclamation and Army Corps of Engineers projects. Basically Feds foot the bill for the water by paying for dams and interstate projects and give it free to the State. Example: Sacramento Delta is all ACE, all of the major Northern California dams are USBR, which counters your second point.


Edited by konqerror - 6/21/14 at 1:15pm
post #50 of 69
Don't dis California. Without us, this country would fold.

And revert to Android. :-D
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post #51 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post





Still more accurate than Yahoo!. Now if you’ll excuse me, my house is about to be blown away.

We wouldn't be so lucky. 1wink.gif jk
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
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post #52 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I know it is just a 'pipe' dream. Moving water from flood areas would never work because it comes too fast. It would require massive drainage projects to capture it fast enough to help mitigate the damage. It just makes me crazy to see so much unwanted water and snow on the TV news when California needs it so badly. 20% electricity cost is nothing compared to having all vegetation die and having huge fire fighting costs.

Here in the Northeast we've been drenched with snow then rain since the beginning of the year. Any amateur meteorologist out there care to explain how California isn't drenched with water from the Pacific Ocean since weather on the northern hemisphere travels West to East most of the time.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #53 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky King View Post

Sure would be cool if Apple could contract with WeatherUnderground Classic (not the mobile app). no matter what you are looking for it's by far the best content and has the greatest accuracy. In fact it is more comprehensive and accurate than the weather that FAA provides to airlines.
Well, in a way, they did. I believe the weather channel bought weather underground last year.
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post #54 of 69
Originally Posted by bigdaddyp View Post
Well, in a way, they did. I believe the weather channel bought weather underground last year.

 

Spec-effing-tacular. Everything good is destroyed.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #55 of 69
Funnily enough, I had the same reaction after hearing the news. Hopefully, they don't ruin it.
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post #56 of 69
Originally Posted by bigdaddyp View Post
Funnily enough, I had the same reaction after hearing the news. Hopefully, they don't ruin it.

 

Well, two years and the website is still up. That’s better than most companies. I can’t imagine them keeping it around, though; it would only take away from their own website, and “we can’t have that”. :no:

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #57 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post
 
Federal aid comes from US Bureau of Reclamation and Army Corps of Engineers projects. Basically Feds foot the bill for the water by paying for dams and interstate projects and give it free to the State. Example: Sacramento Delta is all ACE, all of the major Northern California dams are USBR, which counters your second point.

You can try to spin it any way you like, but California pays way more into the federal coffers than it receives from them. California pays several times more than all the midwest grain producing states combined.


Edited by mstone - 6/21/14 at 6:47pm

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post #58 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

We definitely need some severe weather here in California. I'd tear out my landscaping and put in drought tolerant plants but the association and the city do not permit that. It is getting to the point where I feel guilty about my water usage but it is already as low as I can go and still maintain the garden. In the US we have gas and oil pipelines crossing the country. I wish we had the same ability to move water. Some places in the mid-west are flooded and other places like the southwest are completely dried up. We haven't had any measurable rain here in a year.

Here in Sydney, where the dams almost ran dry after almost ten years of drought we have the opposite council requirements.

The garden and lawn I planted is all drought tolerant mainly Australian native plants, we had to install a rainwater tank which is used for flushing toilets, the washing machine, washing the car and watering the gardens (which I never do anyway).

The only thing I do is mow the lawn now and then and cut plants back every couple of years.
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post #59 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

This will make Marissa very mad.



Yeah but what are they gonna do about it? It's tough being the "middle-man" when you're not adding value.

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post #60 of 69
The BBC Weather App on the iPhone and iPad (United Kingdom) is amazing, even predicts the odd shower! Graphics are brilliant.
post #61 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Quote:
Great answer! I'm wrong.


Imagine seeing that from Constable Odo.
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
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post #62 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post

 
Something like 7% of all California freshwater usage is used for landscaping. 77% is used for agriculture. Moving water is ridiculously energy intensive. 20% of total 
electrical power is used to move water in California through things like the CA Aqueduct.
I know it is just a 'pipe' dream. Moving water from flood areas would never work because it comes too fast. It would require massive drainage projects to capture it fast enough to help mitigate the damage. It just makes me crazy to see so much unwanted water and snow on the TV news when California needs it so badly. 20% electricity cost is nothing compared to having all vegetation die and having huge fire fighting costs.
 


The logical thing is instead of moving tons of water from wet areas, you move the finished food. But try to explain that to "local farming" global warming tree-huggers.



 





We just need rain. It has nothing to do with political ideology. The notion of forsaking California as a dispensable food producing region and instead trucking in finished food from elsewhere is completely naive. California is responsible for around 15% of the total US agricultural production and much of their products are not produced anywhere else.

Edit: Found this

Ranks first in total agricultural production.

Ranks first in total crops production.

Ranks second in total livestock & livestock product production.

Ranks first in production of almonds (100% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of avocados (96% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of broccoli (92% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of celery (93% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of dairy products (20% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of grapes (91% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of greenhouse/nursery (21% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of hay (14% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of lemons (89% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of lettuce (71% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of onions (31% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of peaches (54% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of pistachio nuts (100% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of plums (97% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of strawberries (83% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of tomatoes (53% of U.S. production).

Ranks first in production of walnuts (100% of U.S. production).

Incredible! California must be a fertile land.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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post #63 of 69

I prefer my weather information source to be wearing a sexy dress.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post


Incredible! California must be a fertile land.

How does California rank in baby production?

Cubist
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post #64 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post
 

This makes no sense to me. The Weather Channel gets their data from the National Weather Service offices around the country. So why didn't Apple just go to them instead?

One reason is the NWS did not go to Apple and present them a plan as TWC did.

post #65 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post
(snip! 1/4 mile long quote removed)

Incredible! California must be a fertile land.

Hey, thanks for the really long quote including the extra line breaks¡

Really drove your point home¡

post #66 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by city View Post
 

I prefer my weather information source to be wearing a sexy dress.

 

I do like Bri Winkler. You can download the ABC7 Los Angeles app to watch her video.

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post #67 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by city View Post

I prefer my weather information source to be wearing a sexy dress.


How does California rank in baby production?

2 words, Jackie Guerrido
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #68 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

Quote:
Incredible! California must be a fertile land.
Hey, thanks for the really long quote including the extra line breaks¡
Really drove your point home¡

My pleasure!
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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post #69 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Can there be anything simpler? At a glance I can see the temperature, cloud cover, and wind speed at any point in the day, as well as where it will trend thereafter. Nothing but a graph can show that.

It's way too busy. Very poor layout of that information.

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