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Google's Nest to open smart home platform, share data with developers including Google

post #1 of 45
Thread Starter 
Nest Labs, makers of the Nest Learning Thermostat and Protect smoke and carbon monoxide detector, announced on Tuesday that it will be opening its smart home platform to third-party developers and partners, which includes parent company Google.



In a post to Nest's official blog, cofounder Matt Rogers said the Nest Developer Program will allow other smart home product makers and app developers to connect with the Nest smart thermostat to make whole-home automation a reality.

Instead of sifting through proprietary apps and settings panels, the open API should allow for personalized, automated experiences. For example, a connected Jawbone UP24 band can sense when its user wakes up, signaling Nest to turn on the lights and warm the house.

As noted by The Wall Street Journal, parent company Google has already integrated with Nest to expand Google Now's functionality to support temperature adjustments.

Of course, with the opening of Nest's platform, the firm must share a certain amount of information gathered by its devices, something that doesn't sit well with privacy advocates. More specifically, Google's views on user data harvesting as applied to the company's huge targeted ad business made critics uneasy when Nest Labs was purchased by the search giant for $3.2 billion in January.

The program already has a number of "Works with Nest" integrations running, including LIFX light bulbs, Whirlpool appliances, Jawbone's UP24 fitness band and select Mercedes-Benz cars, though integration does not appear to be incredibly deep. Currently, the technology is being used to control on/off functions, though future implementations could harness deeper user metrics for added personalization.



While Nest is granting use of certain Nest Learning Thermostat functions, Rogers told Forbes that access to data from on-board motion sensors will be restricted.

"We've been building it for about a year," he said. "One reason it's taken us this long to build is we realized we had to be incredibly transparent with our user about data privacy."

Rogers said Nest plans to task a small team with vetting apps and how they link to Nest's platform. He went further by saying Google Now will not be able to harvest user data for Google's targeted ad business.

"We're clear our data can only be used for what a developer will use it for," Rogers said. "We don't want anyone to make the rob-my-house app."

Last week, Nest announced the $555 million purchase of connected home monitoring camera maker Dropcam, adding to Google's quickly growing smart home portfolio.

Apple is also rolling out its own smart home platform with iOS 8's HomeKit, though integration with third-party apps and hardware is in the very early stages of development. For example, Apple has yet to announce a centralized hub from which controls can be issued. Some speculate that the Apple TV could fill the role, though evidence supporting the theory has yet to been uncovered.
post #2 of 45

Share data with developers?

Who's data?  What data?

 

Google got caught off guard with HomeKit and HealthKit and they are now scrambling.

 

Nest will be toast soon.  

They plan to compete with their partners on their own "Open" platform. :no:

Where is Samsung on the "Open platform" partner's list? 

post #3 of 45
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"We're clear our data can only be used for what a developer will use it for," Rogers said. "We don't want anyone to make the rob-my-house app."

 

But you're not willing to work too hard on security.  Are you?

 

"... we do not guarantee that Android is designed to be safe; its format was designed to give more freedom."

Sundar Pichai, Google head of Android, Chrome, and Google Apps

 

So, no.  They're not willing to work hard on security.

You just can't trust Google.

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post #4 of 45
As with Android and on some rare (albeit corrected iOS apps) the developers can be as insensitive to privacy as Google. Therefore, what controls and curation does NEST do to ensure developers don't abuse the data gathered?

As Apple can testify, providing real is privacy hard and demands serious investment in APIs and oversight of developers.
post #5 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

But you're not willing to work too hard on security.  Are you?

"... we do not guarantee that Android is designed to be safe; its format was designed to give more freedom."
Sundar Pichai, Google head of Android, Chrome, and Google Apps

So, no.  They're not willing to work hard on security.
You just can't trust Google.
You are either unaware or ignoring that Pinchai never said any such thing of course. The story that he did was the result of a mistaken trnslation from a Spanish paper covering a Google event a few months ago with no other bloggers or reporters at the presentation corroborating the supposed quotes. The corrected story with his actual comments appeared the next day but wasn't nearly as click-worthy and never reported by AI AFAIK. DED as expected likes to repeat the erroneous quote as it fits his storyline.

When there's Android security scare stories out there with at least some semblence of evidence behind them why use a imaginary one to make a point?
Edited by Gatorguy - 6/24/14 at 4:57am
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post #6 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


You are either unaware or ignoring that Pinchai never said any such thing of course. The story that he did was the result of a mistaken trnslation from a Spanish paper covering a Google event a few months ago with No other bloggers or reporters at the presentationt corroborating the supposed quotes. The corrected story with his actual comments appeared the next day but wasn't nearly as click-worthy and never reported by AI AFAIK. DED as expected likes to repeat the erroneous quote as it fits his storyline.

 DED as expected likes to repeat the erroneous quote as it fits his storyline.

 

This would be similar to the many bloggers who purposely misquoted Tim Cook's English language response about iPhone 5C sales to fit their story lines that iPhone 5C was a failure.

post #7 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

Share data with developers?
Who's data?  What data?

Google got caught off guard with HomeKit and HealthKit and they are now scrambling.

Nest will be toast soon.  
They plan to compete with their partners on their own "Open" platform. 1oyvey.gif
Where is Samsung on the "Open platform" partner's list? 
Caught off guard? I can give you the benefit of the doubt with HealthKit but HomeKit, really? Google has been experimenting with home automation with Android@Home since 2011.
http://www.engadget.com/2011/05/10/google-announces-android-at-home-framework/
post #8 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by gprovida View Post

As with Android and on some rare (albeit corrected iOS apps) the developers can be as insensitive to privacy as Google. Therefore, what controls and curation does NEST do to ensure developers don't abuse the data gathered?

As Apple can testify, providing real is privacy hard and demands serious investment in APIs and oversight of developers.

According to the story an actual team of real humans will be curating the 3rd party apps before they're approved to work with Nest. Sounds like Tony learned a couple of lessons while at Apple.
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post #9 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post

Caught off guard? I can give you the benefit of the doubt with HealthKit but HomeKit, really? Google has been experimenting with home automation with Android@Home since 2011.
http://www.engadget.com/2011/05/10/google-announces-android-at-home-framework/

And from two years ago we have TechCrunch wondering Whatever Happened to Google’s Android@Home?

Here is how they word it: "Google, at the time, said that it wanted to create a service that would turn your entire home into a network of Android accessories, with Android as “the operating system for your home.” Since then, though, neither Google nor its partners have said anything about this initiative."

So Google wants Android in to every device in your home while Apple lets each vendor make their own devices with their own firmware design, which only connects to HomeKit via the optional iOS app that uses a standard communication and security protocols. That's a problem!

Now let's say that TechCrunch completely misconstrued Google's Project X wishes for Android@Home. Why did this happen? Did Google not spell it out well? Why was a Project X vaporware instead of a well thought-out solution that was baked in before it was announced? Do you think Apple wasn't thinking about Home Automation until June of this year?

Again, saying "FIRST!" is not the same as building well and I would bet within its first year we'll see 100x more HomeKit offerings (since for many it's just an update to current apps using new APIs) than we've seen from Google's vaporware in the 4 years since they announced Android@Home.

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post #10 of 45

Yep it a desperate attempt to counter what Apple is doing. Apple just marginalize them to be another device hanging on the wall, one of many which you will be able to buy in the market place in the coming years. Apple just destroy the only thing which differentiated them from everyone else in the market.

 

Can you say another $3B down the drain.

post #11 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

And from two years ago we have TechCrunch wondering Whatever Happened to Google’s Android@Home?

Here is how they word it: "Google, at the time, said that it wanted to create a service that would turn your entire home into a network of Android accessories, with Android as “the operating system for your home.” Since then, though, neither Google nor its partners have said anything about this initiative."

So Google wants Android in to every device in your home while Apple lets each vendor make their own devices with their own firmware design, which only connects to HomeKit via the optional iOS app that uses a standard communication and security protocols. That's a problem!

Now let's say that TechCrunch completely misconstrued Google's Project X wishes for Android@Home. Why did this happen? Did Google not spell it out well? Why was a Project X vaporware instead of a well thought-out solution that was baked in before it was announced? Do you think Apple wasn't thinking about Home Automation until June of this year?

Again, saying "FIRST!" is not the same as building well and I would bet within its first year we'll see 100x more HomeKit offerings (since for many it's just an update to current apps using new APIs) than we've seen from Google's vaporware in the 4 years since they announced Android@Home.

Indeed it is not clear what happened to Android@Home since I/O 2012. My guess is that Google wasn't happy with the implementation and went back to work on it behind the scenes. But this definitely isn't a case of shouting first as at that time there wasn't even the slightest talk about Apple doing something like HomeKit.
In anyway my statement in the comment stands because saying Google was caught off guard by HomeKit is definitely an incorrect statement.
post #12 of 45

As I predicted with Google/Motorola which was they would be out of the cellphone business in 2 to 3 yrs, Nest will be just a dried wet dream spot on Larry's pants in another 18 months.

 

Yes I would say google got caught, as I said above, they never expect Apple to take the approach to allow any hardware/software company get in to the home automation game. I said this before as well, home automation is a mess, hard to impletement and deal with all the various standards around the world. Apple solutions is clean is address the problem at hand, You can use what hardware you want and a software solution that works with your hardware and it all consolidate with apple homekit. This keep apple of the large number of issue of get home automation stuff playing well together, the hardwar and software company will field all the question not apple.

 

Apple provide a platform to make it all work well, it is the foundation which is not strong. Google solution was they hope that all the various hardware and software companies would implement android on and in their devices. Honest this was stupid form the start android is over kill for this kind of thing, most of home automation device run on a small amount of code, they do not need an entire OS on them to work.

post #13 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post

But this definitely isn't a case of shouting first as at that time there wasn't even the slightest talk about Apple doing something like HomeKit.

There doesn't have to be, in fact, if Apple had already mentioned HomeKit then Google couldn't be first with mentioning Android@Home. It's how "FIRST!" works. But that's beside the point as automation, especially of the home, has been a common theme in modern (and past) cultures for a very long time.
Quote:
In anyway my statement in the comment stands because saying Google was caught off guard by HomeKit is definitely an incorrect statement.

Sure they were. HomeKit disrupts the archaic and Microsoftian desire to put the same OS in everything. Android@Home is fundamentally different from HomeKit, or perhaps will be until tomorrow.

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post #14 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


There doesn't have to be, in fact, if Apple had already mentioned HomeKit then Google couldn't be first with mentioning Android@Home. It's how "FIRST!" works. But that's beside the point as automation, especially of the home, has been a common theme in modern (and past) cultures for a very long time.
Sure they were. HomeKit disrupts the archaic and Microsoftian desire to put the same OS in everything. Android@Home is fundamentally different from HomeKit, or perhaps will be until tomorrow.

Actually that is not how "First!" works. That is when there are rumors about a company launching something and another company making a dash to release a similar product first. I.e. the Galaxy Gear (and as a result was a POS).

 

You use the word sure as if you have evidence which is not the case.

post #15 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post

Actually that is not how "First!" works. That is when there are rumors about a company launching something and another company making a dash to release a similar product first. I.e. the Galaxy Gear (and as a result was a POS).

You use the word sure as if you have evidence which is not the case.

"FIRST!" is simply any company or any person trying to be first for the sake of being first. There doesn't have to be some elaborate rumour mill, just some asshat who wants to get a timestamp before anyone else without any regard for substance. But if you want to use a contrived definition I've already proven that home automation has been dreamed of for decade upon decade.

PS: What rumours are there about others eventually posting in a forum that gets some to post "FIRST!" in a thread? ZERO!

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post #16 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


"FIRST!" is simply any company or any person trying to be first for the sake of being first. There doesn't have to be some elaborate rumour mill, just some asshat who wants to get a timestamp before anyone else without any regard for substance.

What rumours are there about others eventually posting in a forum that gets some to post "FIRST!" in a thread? ZERO!


In general that means they want to be "FIRST" to something else now doesn't it? You need a reference point in order to cry "FIRST!".

 

Edit: In forum's (which btw is an annoying habit of some posters) you are "First!" in comparison to the people you expect to follow after your post.

post #17 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post


In general that means they want to be "FIRST" to something else now doesn't it? You need a reference point in order to cry "FIRST!".

I gave you plenty of reference points.

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post #18 of 45
That was a very well done ad. Very well done. Made the center point either the nest thermostat or detector and the other products as accessories.

If Google keeps Nest separately, this really could work for them- although it will almost assuredly be infiltrated by the big G eventually.

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post #19 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post


Caught off guard? I can give you the benefit of the doubt with HealthKit but HomeKit, really? Google has been experimenting with home automation with Android@Home since 2011.
http://www.engadget.com/2011/05/10/google-announces-android-at-home-framework/

 

Most likely caught off guard with it actually going to be a viable, and in production, and supported platform rather than an idea that was being thrown around and not a reality to integrate in the real world.  If Android@Home has been a fully supported product for awhile now, then my point isn't valid.

post #20 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post
 

 

Most likely caught off guard with it actually going to be a viable, and in production, and supported platform rather than an idea that was being thrown around and not a reality to integrate in the real world.  If Android@Home has been a fully supported product for awhile now, then my point isn't valid.


Well, my point is that you can't call it being caught off guard when Google in 2011 already knew that the integration of mobile devices and home automation was going to be an important area. Which they clearly did else they wouldn't have experimented with Android@Home. I'm not talking about Google knowing exactly what Apple was planning on doing.

post #21 of 45
Consider me a late or "never" adopter to home automation.

The rosy scenarios painted for widespread home automation advocates leave out the apartment renters, IMO. I'm seeing a future with fewer and fewer homeowners due to economic and demographic trends, not more.

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post #22 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Nest Labs, makers of the Nest Learning Thermostat and Protect smoke and carbon monoxide detector, announced on Tuesday that it will be opening its smart home platform to third-party developers and partners, which includes parent company Google.

 

Trust:  So hard to earn.  So easy to lose.

 

 

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post #23 of 45
Exciting! I don't have to touch those filthy light switches any more!

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post #24 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post
 


Well, my point is that you can't call it being caught off guard when Google in 2011 already knew that the integration of mobile devices and home automation was going to be an important area. Which they clearly did else they wouldn't have experimented with Android@Home. I'm not talking about Google knowing exactly what Apple was planning on doing.


And that was the point of my statement.  Not that Apple would desire to offer such a platform, but that it is going to ship.

post #25 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post
 

 

Trust:  So hard to earn.  So easy to lose.

 

 


At this moment in time there is nothing to fear I would say. Google develops for Nest but you have the choice to use it or not, just like any other product from 3rd party developers. So you can choose who to share with by using the 3rd party products you want and ignoring those you don't want.

Now if there would be a fixed Nest/Google integration then that would be breaking a promise and thus a problem.


Edited by Chipsy - 6/24/14 at 7:37am
post #26 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post
 

Now if there would be a fixed Nest/Google integration then that would be breaking a promise and thus a problem.

While I realize that's not the case- and those with Nest products that fear Google integration don't need to worry yet- can you understand the hesitation for new adoption due to the fact policies could change in the future?

 

Ive said previously- those in their early twentys and younger won't care at all about their privacy, so even if it does change, it will be a good resource for Google.  And honestly- if I were Google, I'd sit on it for a couple years, then integrate.  Yes, you'd lose some, but you would gain invaluable information and in the long-run I would think it would outweigh the small loss.

 

Time will tell.

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post #27 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


You are either unaware or ignoring that Pinchai never said any such thing of course. The story that he did was the result of a mistaken trnslation from a Spanish paper covering a Google event a few months ago with no other bloggers or reporters at the presentation corroborating the supposed quotes. The corrected story with his actual comments appeared the next day but wasn't nearly as click-worthy and never reported by AI AFAIK. DED as expected likes to repeat the erroneous quote as it fits his storyline.

When there's Android security scare stories out there with at least some semblence of evidence behind them why use a imaginary one to make a point?

How convenient!  LOL!  The corrected quote provided by Google.  LOLOLOLOL!!!!!  It would be different if this was originally posted on a anti-Google site.  Well those don't exist because any for profit site relies on them for income so they dare not speak against them.  This was a quote from a google fan site that just deleted the offensive statements the made google look bad and told the truth.  

post #28 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post
 

While I realize that's not the case- and those with Nest products that fear Google integration don't need to worry yet- can you understand the hesitation for new adoption due to the fact policies could change in the future?

 

Ive said previously- those in their early twentys and younger won't care at all about their privacy, so even if it does change, it will be a good resource for Google.  And honestly- if I were Google, I'd sit on it for a couple years, then integrate.  Yes, you'd lose some, but you would gain invaluable information and in the long-run I would think it would outweigh the small loss.

 

Time will tell.

 

Yep. There's a balance between convenience and security in the digital world. Google front loads so much convenience into the Chrome/Android experience that users get hooked on the convenience. Then when Google asks for more access, the users are addicted to the convenience, and grant it. I'm not in my twenties, I'm already like "f**k it," this s**t is too useful to limit because of an unsubstantiated threat. Show me harm, and I'll consider the threat. Until then, it's just a bunch of people running around telling me the sky is falling... for the last 5 years.

post #29 of 45
Quote:
"One reason it's taken us this long to build is we realized we had to be incredibly transparent with our user about data privacy."

 

No. When you're incredible, I don't believe you and I don't trust you. If you want trust, you need to be credible.  I realize you thought you were speaking informally and being hyperbolic, however, you impugn your customers who desire data privacy when you say they have incredible expectations.  No, sir, it's you who lack credibility.

post #30 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by genovelle View Post

How convenient!  LOL!  The corrected quote provided by Google.  LOLOLOLOL!!!!!  It would be different if this was originally posted on a anti-Google site.  Well those don't exist because any for profit site relies on them for income so they dare not speak against them.  This was a quote from a google fan site that just deleted the offensive statements the made google look bad and told the truth.  

There's probably at least as many anti-Google bloggers (some particularly loud ones on Microsoft's payroll) as there are anti-Apple. They're not hard to find at all. As for the (mistranslated) comments about Android and security I would have thought the fact no other journalist or blogger out of the most-assured dozens attending the Mobile World Congress events reported hearing the same Pinchai quote would be a big red-flag. Not to you perhaps, but other reputable sites like Mashable and TechCrunch were quick to correct the story since even the original source didn't stand the supposed quote. BTW, I thought the first story was in Spanish. It was instead French.
http://www.frandroid.com/actualites-generales/198006_pour-sundar-pichai-le-galaxy-s6-sera-android
Edited by Gatorguy - 6/24/14 at 8:47am
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post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

There's probably at least as many anti-Google bloggers (some on Microsoft's payroll) as there are anti-Apple. They're not hard to find at all. As for the (mistranslated) comments about Android and security I would have thought the fact no other journalist or blogger attending the event reported the same Pinchai quote would be a red-flag. Not to you perhaps, but other reputable sites like Mashable and TechCrunch were happy to correct the story since even the original quote source didn't stand the supposed quote. BTW, I thought the first story was in Spanish. It was instead French.
http://www.frandroid.com/actualites-generales/198006_pour-sundar-pichai-le-galaxy-s6-sera-android
Techcrunch! Lol. They are Apple haters. No nothing of mashable, but I doubt a Android fan site would add text that hurts Google. They change their page to suit Google using their transcript instead of their own. The difference is Googles excludes the two sentences in question. None of these sites have any journalistic integrity when it comes to Google. They won't bite the hand thatq
feeds them.
post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by genovelle View Post

... I doubt a Android fan site would add text that hurts Google.

Intentionally? I agree with you. Mistakenly? Of course it happens. From reports that's just what happened with the French fansite. They made an error.
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post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Intentionally? I agree with you. Mistakenly? Of course it happens. From reports that's just what happened with the French fansite. They made an error.
I don't think it was a mistake. Google moved immediately to clarify what he meant, then released a corrected transcript. The offending sentence was surgically removed. To me that says, he said it. It wasn't a mis-translation because the whole sentence disappeared. It was a rewriting of the answer after the fact.
post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by genovelle View Post

I don't think it was a mistake.

I know you don't. That not another single reporter at the event apparently heard that statement shouldn't get in the way of you holding fast to your beliefs. Give no quarter!
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post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Intentionally? I agree with you. Mistakenly? Of course it happens. From reports that's just what happened with the French fansite. They made an error.
Keep in mind these reporters rarely report on the crazy stuff Google employees say. Including Schmidt's comments on privacy. They are very selective in what they print about them. That's why most Google fans have no idea how many times this company has been found guilty of violating consumer privacy laws intentionally. When you have a company who controls monetization of the internet by controlling search, what site that depends on search to remain relevant and makes their revenue from Google ads is going to risk being demoted in search rankings by accident of course, or some glitch mistakenly keeping ads from working on your site.
post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by genovelle View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Intentionally? I agree with you. Mistakenly? Of course it happens. From reports that's just what happened with the French fansite. They made an error.
Keep in mind these reporters rarely report on the crazy stuff Google employees say. Including Schmidt's comments on privacy. They are very selective in what they print about them. That's why most Google fans have no idea how many times this company has been found guilty of violating consumer privacy laws intentionally. When you have a company who controls monetization of the internet by controlling search, what site that depends on search to remain relevant and makes their revenue from Google ads is going to risk being demoted in search rankings by accident of course, or some glitch mistakenly keeping ads from working on your site.
In the words of your "tinfoil hat strong in this one is"
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by genovelle View Post

When you have a company who controls monetization of the internet by controlling search, what site that depends on search to remain relevant and makes their revenue from Google ads is going to risk being demoted in search rankings by accident of course, or some glitch mistakenly keeping ads from working on your site.

Google has done that? With so many valid concerns about Google's business you really feel FUD is the answer? When you make silly statements like that it makes it hard to take you seriously. There's no shortage of news reports on both real and creatively imagined Google privacy missteps. You don't seem to have any trouble finding them nor do others here. Just Google it again, they aren't hidden as you already knew.
Quote:
Originally Posted by genovelle View Post

Keep in mind these reporters rarely report on the crazy stuff Google employees say. Including Schmidt's comments on privacy.
Wow, you're right. A Google search for "Schmidt on privacy" only returns 40Million+ results. 1rolleyes.gif
Edited by Gatorguy - 6/24/14 at 10:14am
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post #38 of 45
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

You are either unaware or ignoring that Pinchai never said any such thing of course.  ...

When there's Android security scare stories out there with at least some semblence of evidence behind them why use a imaginary one to make a point?

 

Pinchai is either unaware of or ignoring that 99% of all mobile malware targets Android.

If he were aware of or if he were not ignoring that particular catastrophe, he'd drop everything to try and fix it.

He's obviously not.  Maybe he's striving for 100%.

 

And no, that 99% number isn't just a semantic shade of meaning lost in translation.

Here are a few security scare stories (not imaginary) out there to make my point:

 

Kaspersky: 99% of all mobile threats target Android devices

http://www.kaspersky.com/about/news/virus/2012/99_of_all_mobile_threats_target_Android_devices

(research by Kaspersky Labs)

 

betanews: 99 percent of mobile financial malware writers prefer Android

http://betanews.com/2013/12/12/99-percent-of-mobile-financial-malware-writers-prefer-android/

(research by NSS)

 

GigaOM: Study shows 99% of mobile malware in 2013 targeted Android devices

http://gigaom.com/2014/01/21/study-shows-99-of-mobile-malware-in-2013-targeted-android-devices/

(research by Cisco)(

 

BGR: 

http://bgr.com/2014/01/21/android-mobile-malware-report/

 

Quote from the BGR article:

 

"Cisco also says that “Android users, at 71%, have the highest encounter rates with all forms of web-delivered malware,” which Cisco says can include “phishing, likejacking, or other social engineering ruses, or forcible redirects to websites other than expected.” iPhone users, in contrast, accounted for just 14% of all web-delivered malware encounters."

 

So hey, Sundar, your platform is NOT SECURE.

You going to do anything about it?  No?  All you care about is delivering ads?

Yeah.  Thought so.

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post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Pinchai is either unaware of or ignoring that 99% of all mobile malware targets Android.
If he were aware of or if he were not ignoring that particular catastrophe, he'd drop everything to try and fix it.
He's obviously not.  Maybe he's striving for 100%.

And no, that 99% number isn't just a semantic shade of meaning lost in translation.
Here are a few security scare stories (not imaginary) out there to make my point:

Kaspersky: 99% of all mobile threats target Android devices

betanews: 99 percent of mobile financial malware writers prefer Android

BGR: 
http://bgr.com/2014/01/21/android-mobile-malware-report/

Quote from the BGR article:

"Cisco also says that “Android users, at 71%, have the highest encounter rates with all forms of web-delivered malware,” which Cisco says can include “phishing, likejacking, or other social engineering ruses, or forcible redirects to websites other than expected.” iPhone users, in contrast, accounted for just 14% of all web-delivered malware encounters."

So hey, Sundar, your platform is NOT SECURE.
You going to do anything about it?  No?  All you care about is delivering ads?
Yeah.  Thought so.

How would Google prevent malware writers from targeting Android? Targeting and hitting are not one and the same. You knew that.

BTW, did you actually read your BGR link or just grab what you thought was a juicy quote?

"The good news is that mobile malware is still a very small portion of overall malware in the world. The bad news is that if it does grow in prevalence then it’s much more likely to hurt Android devices. Cisco’s annual security report claims that 99% of all mobile malware targeted Android devices last year, although the firm also notes that such malware only made up around 1.2% of all web malware encounters in all of 2013."

71% of 1.2% is hardly bad news considering most targets of those misleading social ruses or phishing attacks are in BRIC or 3rd world countries where Android is by far the predominant mobile OS. iOS has no better protection against phishing attacks than Android to the best of my knowledge. If they do clue me in.
Edited by Gatorguy - 6/24/14 at 10:42am
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

How would Google prevent malware writers from targeting Android? Targeting and hitting are not one and the same. You knew that.

BTW, did you actually read your BGR link or just grab what you thought was a juicy quote?

"The good news is that mobile malware is still a very small portion of overall malware in the world. The bad news is that if it does grow in prevalence then it’s much more likely to hurt Android devices. Cisco’s annual security report claims that 99% of all mobile malware targeted Android devices last year, although the firm also notes that such malware only made up around 1.2% of all web malware encounters in all of 2013."

71% of 1.2% is hardly bad news considering most targets of those misleading social ruses or phishing attacks are in BRIC or 3rd world countries where Android is by far the predominant mobile OS. iOS has no better protection against phishing attacks than Android to the best of my knowledge. If they do clue me in.

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