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Alleged 4.7" front panel for Apple's 'iPhone 6' handled on camera to show one-handed use - Page 4

post #121 of 139
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

I said that’s not the same as voice calling…

 

http://support.apple.com/kb/TI189

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #122 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

http://support.apple.com/kb/TI189

 

FaceTime audio-only calls are possible only between FaceTime-enabled devices. You can't make a FaceTime call to a landline, not even an audio-only call.

Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

Audio Engineer

V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

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Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

Audio Engineer

V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

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post #123 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post
 

 

NEWSFLASH: My doctor's office doesn't have FaceTime. Neither does the garage where we take the car for repairs. You get the idea.


Do you honestly think AT&T would continue to offer 3G plans for the iPad for as little as $15/month - without a contract - if Apple configured the devices to work as cell phones? Use some critical thinking, folks. There's no free lunch.

post #124 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck Simon View Post

All you (small handed) people who want to keep the iPhone at 4", good for you. The company will keep producing the 5, 5c, & 5s for the next 3-4 years I'd guess. But the time is needed to produce bigger iPhones for guys with hands larger than ham_bone and his friends? MY friends who have iPhones love the phones and the OS but hate the small screens. 3.5" and 4" screens are too small, my ten year old likes it though. I'm looking forward to 5.5" myself, I'll get that and a new Mac Air and ditch my iPad.


Throughout the history of the cell phone, miniaturization has always been a driving force behind its evolution. This recent fad for larger phones is the result of a successful marketing effort by Android OEMs who know they can't compete head to head with Apple's engineering when it comes to making sleeker and slimmer models while increasing performance and battery life.

 

I see a similarity between this and the SUV fad a few years ago with people buying ridiculously large, gas-guzzling vehicles that never strayed off a paved road or hauled anything other than groceries and the kids' soccer gear. 

 

These larger phones also appeal to a segment of the market that can't afford an iPad and therefore seek an "all-in-one" device in between a phone and a tablet - with all the associated tradeoffs. 

 

All we (normal handed) people who prefer a pocketable iPhone will not accept a choice between a larger iPhone and a lower-spec model. We expect to continue to buy Apple's flagship phone in a normal-sized form factor.

 

We are not the minority - you are. While it may make sense for Apple to introduce larger phones for that subset of the market that wants them, it would be foolish of them to make the larger phones the exclusive form factor for their flagship models.


Edited by freediverx - 7/7/14 at 2:39am
post #125 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by ham_bone View Post

I am a 34yr old guy who (like the guys i hang around with) do NOT want a bigger phone. One of my friends still has his 4s because he hates a big phone. Due to some of my job requirements that can be (slightly) physical at times, i keep a slim case on my phone at work. I have a lot of friends who are plumbers, contractors, electricians etc that have to use lifeproof or otterbox cases while they are working. Add the bulk of that to a larger phone and you now have a brick like the old days. If theres a "phablet" market for those with purses, murses & huge pockets then build/offer one for them. But dont kill a pocketable phone. The samsung flip i traded in for my 1st iphone took up less pocket space than my 5s does. Keep the PHONE in iPHONE.
RANT OVER.

Apple has the opportunity to do the exact opposite. They can offer the two bigger sizes at 4.7" and 5.5" while offering future 4" models with the smaller bezels and rounded edges. The future 4" models will be even smaller, more pocketable and easier to use single handedly than the current 4" models.

post #126 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post


Throughout the history of the cell phone, miniaturization has always been a driving force behind its evolution. This recent fad for larger phones is the result of a successful marketing effort by Android OEMs who know they can't compete head to head with Apple's engineering when it comes to making sleeker and slimmer models while increasing performance and battery life.

I see a similarity between this and the SUV fad a few years ago with people buying ridiculously large, gas-guzzling vehicles that never strayed off a paved road or hauled anything other than groceries and the kids' soccer gear. 

These larger phones also appeal to a segment of the market that can't afford an iPad and therefore seek an "all-in-one" device in between a phone and a tablet - with all the associated tradeoffs. 

All we (normal handed) people who prefer a pocketable iPhone will not accept a choice between a larger iPhone and a lower-spec model. We expect to continue to buy Apple's flagship phone in a normal-sized form factor.

We are not the minority - you are. While it may make sense for Apple to introduce larger phones for that subset of the market that wants them, it would be foolish of them to make the larger phones the exclusive form factor for their flagship models.


I disagree. The cell phone isn't all about miniaturization. How else would you explain the iPhone being one of the largest phones out there when it first came out (we were fresh from coming off the Motorola razor). And then how do you explain them going from 3.5 to 4"? That's not miniaturization, that's enlarging in both cases.

I also disagree that those wanting smaller phones are the majority. The statistics we've seen clearly show the preference is larger- unless you have some data you'd like to link?

2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
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post #127 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

I disagree. The cell phone isn't all about miniaturization. How else would you explain the iPhone being one of the largest phones out there when it first came out (we were fresh from coming off the Motorola razor). And then how do you explain them going from 3.5 to 4"? That's not miniaturization, that's enlarging in both cases.
 

 

Much of technology is all about miniaturization. For example, as flat screen TVs have grown in size, the electronics within them have shrunk to the point where top of the line models are now under 2" thick. Meanwhile, the Razor is a terrible choice for comparison since it wasn't a smartphone by any stretch of the imagination. Compared to the smartphones of the time like the Palm Treos and Nokia N-series, the iPhone was about the same size or smaller.  However, the Razor is an excellent example of the quest for miniaturization in non-smartphones.

 

The increase from 3.5" to 4" was the first sign of Apple responding to the Android OEMs' "bigger-is-better" spin, which I suspect they did only grudgingly after investing significant design efforts to chose the original display's optimal size and shape. Apple designs products to be optimal for a specific purpose. They clearly recognized the potential for a larger form factor and that's why we have the iPad and iPad Mini. These in-between jumbo Android phones are the wannabe Swiss Army Knives of smartphones - jack of all trades, master of none. They primarily appeal to the budget customer seeking a more cost effective all in one solution as an alternative to the more costly option of buying separate devices for separate purposes.

 

 

I also disagree that those wanting smaller phones are the majority. The statistics we've seen clearly show the preference is larger- unless you have some data you'd like to link?
 

We're talking about potential buyers of a flagship iPhone, not the Android market in general.

 

Quoting from my own comment on another thread: 

 

A recent RBC Capital Markets survey of 705 would-be iPhone buyers showed 64% interested in buying the next iPhone model even if it's bigger - with 38% interested in a 4.7" model and 26% interested in one with a 5.5" display.

 

The way the survey was conducted places a great deal of bias on pricing, and makes it impossible to say how many of those interested in the 4.7" model might have preferred a 4" form factor flagship model.

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by freediverx - 7/7/14 at 8:49am
post #128 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post
 

 

Much of technology is all about miniaturization. For example, as flat screen TVs have grown in size, the electronics within them have shrunk to the point where top of the line models are now under 2" thick. Meanwhile, the Razor is a terrible choice for comparison since it wasn't a smartphone by any stretch of the imagination. Compared to the smartphones of the time like the Palm Treos and Nokia N-series, the iPhone was about the same size or smaller.  However, the Razor is an excellent example of the quest for miniaturization in non-smartphones.

 

The increase from 3.5" to 4" was the first sign of Apple responding to the Android OEMs' "bigger-is-better" spin, which I suspect they did only grudgingly after investing significant design efforts to chose the original display's optimal size and shape. Apple designs products to be optimal for a specific purpose. They clearly recognized the potential for a larger form factor and that's why we have the iPad and iPad Mini. These in-between jumbo Android phones are the wannabe Swiss Army Knives of smartphones - jack of all trades, master of none. They primarily appeal to the budget customer seeking a more cost effective all in one solution as an alternative to the more costly option of buying separate devices for separate purposes.

 

 

 

We're talking about potential buyers of a flagship iPhone, not the Android market in general.

 

Quoting from my own comment on another thread: 

 

A recent RBC Capital Markets survey of 705 would-be iPhone buyers showed 64% interested in buying the next iPhone model even if it's bigger - with 38% interested in a 4.7" model and 26% interested in one with a 5.5" display.

 

The way the survey was conducted places a great deal of bias on pricing, and makes it impossible to say how many of those interested in the 4.7" model might have preferred a 4" form factor flagship model.

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for that.  Definitely enlightening on the first part.

 

As for your 2nd part; however, it doesn't help with your original point that those wanting a smaller phone are in the majority, and those wanting larger are in the minority.  There still is no proof or data that proves that.  But there are a half dozen legitimate surveys dating back to 2012 (when iPhone was only 3.5" and most Android phones were just 4") that people preferred the larger screen size.

 

I determine what phone I get based on this order:

-OS

-Interconnectability (iCloud w/ my Mac for example)

-Belief in the Company/Brand

-Specs (such as screen size)

 

So, while I'd prefer a larger screen, it is by no means my largest determining factor.

2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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post #129 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

 

As for your 2nd part; however, it doesn't help with your original point that those wanting a smaller phone are in the majority, and those wanting larger are in the minority.  There still is no proof or data that proves that.  But there are a half dozen legitimate surveys dating back to 2012 (when iPhone was only 3.5" and most Android phones were just 4") that people preferred the larger screen size.

 

As I said, the survey would have been better if the options hadn't been grouped by price and model. It at least suggests that a fairly small minority, 26%, were interested in a 6" iPhone. 

 

 

I determine what phone I get based on this order:

-OS

-Interconnectability (iCloud w/ my Mac for example)

-Belief in the Company/Brand

-Specs (such as screen size)

 

So, while I'd prefer a larger screen, it is by no means my largest determining factor.

 

 

Ergonomics and real world utility don't play a role? If I use your criteria then I would assume that you would always choose the largest available phone so long as the first three conditions were met. So, a 7" iPhone? 8"?

 

For me, while a larger display is tempting, its benefits are offset by reduced pocketability and single-handed usability.

post #130 of 139
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post
I disagree. The cell phone isn't all about miniaturization. How else would you explain the iPhone being one of the largest phones out there when it first came out (we were fresh from coming off the Motorola razor). And then how do you explain them going from 3.5 to 4"? That's not miniaturization, that's enlarging in both cases.

 

This is a joke post, right?

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #131 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

 

Ergonomics and real world utility don't play a role? If I use your criteria then I would assume that you would always choose the largest available phone so long as the first three conditions were met. So, a 7" iPhone? 8"?

 

For me, while a larger display is tempting, its benefits are offset by reduced pocketability and single-handed usability.

Going to that extreme- of course not.  And I doubt anyone would want a 1".  But within reason- and 4.7 or even 5.5 is within reason.

 

I'd take a 6" iPhone vs a 4" Android.  Yes.  Every time.

2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
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Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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post #132 of 139

I was thinking, and this is rather outside the box kind of thinking: what is they included all three sizes in their upcoming refresh. now, before everyone jump down my throat, give it a little bit of time to sink in.  It allows the customer (a.k.a. you and I) the choice to decide what kind of phone we want. If it uses the same chip, the same storage, and the only difference is screen real estate, this becomes an option.

 

So I am thinking something like this (with 2 year contract):

 

iPhone 5S (16GB): Free

 

  iPhone 6 4" iPhone 6 4.7" iPhone 6 5.5"
16 GB $99 $149 or $199 $199 or $299
32 GB $199 $249 or $299 $299 or $399
64 GB $299 $349 or $399 $399 or $499
128 GB $399 $449 or $499 $499 or $599

 

I put in those or portions because I think that is Apple were to become very aggressive with its storage prices, Android/Scamsung would be in a massive world of hurt (since Apple can afford to take a minor hit on their margins).  This would make the iP6 extremely configurable to whomever would want whatever size.  Everyone wants a different size for whatever their desires are (smaller size and greater portability, larger size because they find it easier, etc). Realistically, not one person is inherently wrong, I just do not see any way of being able to hit the whole market at once without this approach to it.

 

Also, this way one size isn't better performant than the other, it is just a different screen size.  I know the likelihood of this ever happening is around the same level of me hitting the Powerball, but that doesn't mean it can't happen.

-- Mike Eggleston
-- Mac Fanatic since 1984.
-- Proud Member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals
-- Wii #: 8913 3004 4519 2027

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-- Mike Eggleston
-- Mac Fanatic since 1984.
-- Proud Member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals
-- Wii #: 8913 3004 4519 2027

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post #133 of 139
I'd love that Mike. Maybe not powerball odds- maybe more like pick 4 1wink.gif

Id think if they had a new 4" (which I don't think they will)- it would be $199 with an increase up in sizes.

I'm very curious how they will handle the pricing if they do release two (or in your case 3) sizes. Same? $50? $100?
It'll be interesting to say the least.

2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
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post #134 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonshf View Post
 

Apple has the opportunity to do the exact opposite. They can offer the two bigger sizes at 4.7" and 5.5" while offering future 4" models with the smaller bezels and rounded edges. The future 4" models will be even smaller, more pocketable and easier to use single handedly than the current 4" models.

 

That would be great! IF they dont compromise with the 4" models specs. Ideally, I'd love to see a revamped iphone4 with retina, new (energy efficient) chipset, and a lightweight rear panel. Then take some of the weight they shaved off in that process and Add that TO THE BATTERY! You would now have a phone that would appeal to tons of techs, mechanics, & contractors. even more so if they ruggedized it a little.

post #135 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallenjt View Post
 

To make story short: you don't want any thing big? Stay with iPhone 5s. It should serve your needs for at least 2-3 more years. Apple will eventually replace 4" model since 4.7" one is not that bigger than current iPhone 5/5s.

 

i like my ipad2 the size it is and am intrigued by a slightly larger ipadAir,  but no, i dont want my "phone" big.

 

the 5 "isnt much bigger" than the 4, the 6 "shouldnt be much bigger" than the 5, etc etc.

I understand theres a market for a bigger screen. my wife also has a 5s and wants a bigger screen. her best friend just went to a GS5 and my wife loves a lot about it. the screen size, water resistance (sh leaves phone around the sink/counter a lot), and the battery life. 

i get that many people want a bigger phone, but many people also dont & i am simply stating that i hope apple doesnt abandon the pocketable, 1 handed device.  

post #136 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

A couple millimeters of thinness do not compensate for a screen that extends 1/2"-1" beyond the reach of your thumb. The phone could be as flat as a credit card and it still wouldn't mitigate the issue.

Like I mentioned in an earlier post you replied to, you small handed people can keep the 4, 4s, 5, 5c & 5s. Regular guys like me need a bigger handset and a bigger screen. All my friends with iPhones (which is most of them) want the same. You little guys have your handsets. The rest of us want something bigger, with a bigger screen. This fall apple will be to accommodate all users.
post #137 of 139
Originally Posted by Chuck Simon View Post
Like I mentioned in an earlier post you replied to, you small handed people can keep the 4, 4s, 5, 5c & 5s. Regular guys like me need a bigger handset and a bigger screen. 

 

Your height, please, for reference. I fail to see how 6’3”+ is “regular” when 6’ is the average.

 
All my friends… 

 

Too bad that’s irrelevant.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #138 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

I fail to see how 6’3”+ is “regular” when 6’ is the average.

 

Originally Posted by Chuck Simon View Post

Like I mentioned in an earlier post you replied to, you small handed people can keep the 4, 4s, 5, 5c & 5s. Regular guys like me need a bigger handset and a bigger screen. All my friends with iPhones (which is most of them) want the same. You little guys have your handsets. The rest of us want something bigger, with a bigger screen. This fall apple will be to accommodate all users.

 

Who you calling 'small handed people'? Average height of men in the US is 5' 10".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_height

 

Only 14.5 percent of all men in the US are six feet or over. In fact, the only countries in the world with an average height in the 6 ft. range are Scandinavian, like The Netherlands, Denmark and Norway.

 

I have no objection to larger iPhones so long as Apple continues to make flagship models designed for the large majority of users without freakishly large hands.

 


Edited by freediverx - 7/14/14 at 6:48am
post #139 of 139
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

Average height of men in the US is 5' 10".

 

Ah, even less in his favor.  Average is 5’10”? Guess that’s what happens when morons work to make it “acceptable” to be as fat as you want.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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