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Apple's iOS gains ground on Android in US as iPhone retains smartphone lead

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
For the three months ending in May, Apple's iPhone grew its dominating lead as the top U.S. smartphone, while iOS gained ground on Google's Android, says research firm comScore.


Source: comScore


According to data from comScore's MobiLens and Mobile Metrix services, Apple's iPhone accounted for a 41.9 percent share of U.S. smartphone users in May, up 0.6 points from a month earlier. Samsung also enlarged its second-place piece of the pie with a 0.8 percent change over the same period, ending with a 27.8 percent share of the market.

Out of the top-five OEMs, only Apple and Samsung managed to gain subscribers over the three-month period, with LG and HTC both shedding 0.3 points to come in third and fifth, respectively. LG left May with 6.5 percent of the market, while HTC managed 5.1 percent. Motorola held steady with 6.3 percent, coming in fourth.

Google's Android remained the No. 1 smartphone platform in the U.S. with a 52.1 percent marketshare, or 10.2 points more than Apple's iOS. The world's largest mobile OS showed no movement, however, meaning the iPhone's 0.6 percent increase came from less popular platforms like fourth-place BlackBerry, which lost 0.6 points in the three-month period.




Microsoft's Windows Phone came in third with no change in marketshare, while Symbian rounded out the top five with 0.1 percent of the market, down 0.1 percent from February.

comScore estimates some 169 million people owned smartphones in the U.S. during the May period, up 4 percent since February. Smartphones now account for 70 percent of the nation's overall cellular market.
post #2 of 51
Very impressive for Apple considering this is the 'slowdown' before the storm when the iPhone 6 is released.
post #3 of 51
People are waking up. They got stuck with an Android phone for two years, now they want a better life.
Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
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Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
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post #4 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

Very impressive for Apple considering this is the 'slowdown' before the storm when the iPhone 6 is released.

I agree. Samsung has just had its "peak" following release of its latest refresh, and Apple continued to suck up market share. This bodes very well for the coming iOS refresh and a resultant phenomenal growth in market share by Apple.

post #5 of 51
With apple potentially releasing larger iPhones this fall, I forsee massive market share gains.

Apple will have an extremely strong lineup with the 5C for free and the up to 5.5 inch iPhone that I can't see android manufacturers being able to hold on to much market share.
post #6 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

With apple potentially releasing larger iPhones this fall, I forsee massive market share gains.

Apple will have an extremely strong lineup with the 5C for free and the up to 5.5 inch iPhone that I can't see android manufacturers being able to hold on to much market share.

Just whatever GoogleBots and carrier salesman can give them, that's it.
Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
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Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
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post #7 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacto Joe View Post
 

I agree. Samsung has just had its "peak" following release of its latest refresh, and Apple continued to suck up market share. This bodes very well for the coming iOS refresh and a resultant phenomenal growth in market share by Apple.

 

??  umm... Samsung's 0.8% growth over 3-month period is a sign that Samsung just had its "peak", but a teeny-weeny 0.6% gain is an indication of  Apple's market dominance -- or sucking up market share?  

post #8 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by tooltalk View Post
 

 

??  umm... Samsung's 0.8% growth over 3-month period is a sign that Samsung just had its "peak", but a teeny-weeny 0.6% gain is an indication of  Apple's market dominance -- or sucking up market share?  


As you failed to notice, Samdung released their new flagship and only got .8 percent.

 

Apple is running on phones that are several months old and pretty much matched Samdung's gains.

Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
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Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
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post #9 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

Very impressive for Apple considering this is the 'slowdown' before the storm when the iPhone 6 is released.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacto Joe View Post
 

I agree. Samsung has just had its "peak" following release of its latest refresh, and Apple continued to suck up market share. This bodes very well for the coming iOS refresh and a resultant phenomenal growth in market share by Apple.


My thoughts exactly.  Samsung is the biggest competitor, by far. Their flagship just released within the past few months. This is a peak season for them. Their gains a small considering. Meanwhile, Apple sees gains at only 0.2 % less change than Samsung.  This during Samsung's peak, Apple's historically slowest quarter, only 2 current phone models from Apple, and 1 size, while Samsung blankets the market at every size.

This data sums things up obviously.  In terms of market share, Apple does more with less (2 current models, 1 screen size), pretty much equaling market share growth (and leading with marketshare per brand), with what it takes Samsung multiple models at every screen size to accomplish. 

So add a screen size in fall for Apple.  This will not only equal Apple's traditional peak season, but go beyond.  They could potential have 3 screen sizes for the first time. And they are entering the bigger screen market for the first time... The 5 and the 5s did not really attract the bigger screen market at all. It merely extended the current length at the time, which was not a big enough change.  


If Apple continues to sell the 5 and the 5s this will be the first real time they will hit both small and big screen markets. I wonder if they will continue to sell all 3 (assuming all rumors of a 4.7 and 5.5 are correct).  It would be smart to keep the 5s around as along as at least the 4 has been around.  

post #10 of 51
This report should bode well for Q3 earnings...
post #11 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by tooltalk View Post
 

 

??  umm... Samsung's 0.8% growth over 3-month period is a sign that Samsung just had its "peak", but a teeny-weeny 0.6% gain is an indication of  Apple's market dominance -- or sucking up market share?  

 

It kinda is when you consider Samsung sells, even here in the U.S. market, a lot of cheaper phones.  So it's not exactly a battle of how much money consumers spend on each brand.  If that was the stakes, Apple would trounce Samsung by a much wider margin and would have shown a lot more growth this last quarter as well.

I don't care about what the ignorant masses perceive as truth. I'm concerned with the facts on the ground.
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I don't care about what the ignorant masses perceive as truth. I'm concerned with the facts on the ground.
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post #12 of 51
How did they get these numbers again?
post #13 of 51
Competition, at least in terms of marketshare, it good for the consumers as it creates pressure to innovate and produce better products. That being said, I still get a lot of satisfaction over these reports of Apple quietly taking the market from Samsung and other manufacturers, precisely because these other manufacturers are so dishonest in their presentation of both their own products and of the iPhone and other Apple products. When Apple entered this market, the competition was operating on razor-thin margins, which on some level precluded serious innovation (because it costs big money in R&D to innovate), and instead depended on selling huge numbers of phones to recover their investments and make a profit. Industry leaders at the time, such as Microsoft's Steve Balmer, literally laughed at Apple when they entered the market. There were initially some corrections (such as Apple lowering the original iPhone price by $200 after only a few months), but the product was so innovative that consumers accepted the price overall, and were willing to pay the "Apple tax" to have a premium product. An interesting issue that I don't see people talk about is that Apple generated a margin of profit that did not previously exist in that market; they single-handedly redefined the ceiling for profits in the smartphone (or even cell-phone) arena and then started rapidly claiming those potential profits. The iPhone became their most successful product in history and drove Apple to the position of most profitable technology company in the world.

Eventually, Samsung came along with the Galaxy series. Since they were unable to accomplish the kind of major innovation that sway end-users to buy their product, they augmented what innovation they were able to come up with by copying designs both in hardware and software that Apple had come up with. This allowed them to produce a product that, on the surface, offered the major features of the iPhone, but at a better price than the iPhone. Ultimately, this accomplished two things: 1) it allowed them to increase their velocity in terms of gaining marketshare from competitors, primarily at the expense of Nokia and RIM (but Samsung increased their overall velocity relative to Apple), and 2) it allowed them to increase their margins overall. This was interesting, because it ate away at profits that may have otherwise gone to Apple, which emboldened Samsung and gave them increasing marketing power. Eventually, Apple sued them and inevitably won, but the ~1 billion dollar settlement (that Samsung might eventually have to pay Apple) was a relatively small price to pay for the overall increase in profits that this new tact was gaining Samsung.

The problem with Samsung's approach is that it is self-limiting. By copying Apple, they are appealing to a market that want Apple products, but, for whatever reason (usually price, but include other factors such as investment in the Android ecosystem), cannot make the commitment to buy an Apple product. As the remaining (non-Apple, non-Samsung) marketshare is claimed by these two companies, the trajectories, velocities, or whatever you wish to call it will inevitably decrease. At some point in a two-horse race, the market leaders must inevitably run out of any extra marketshare to target, and must then attempt to take marketshare directly from the other competitor. Unfortunately for Samsung, there are more people converting from Android to iOS rather than the other way around. As a result, it is inevitable that Apple will win this race, barring some significantly new innovation from a competitor (Samsung, Microsoft, Amazon, etc.). However, Samsung will, at that point, own enough of the market that their mobile product line will still be a major source of income to the company.

In the above case, Samsung doesn't lose, because it is a huge, global organization making thousands of products (everything from microwaves to Oil-tankers), and as such, the smartphone market is simply a way to increase its cash reserves for the next investment it makes. However, while Samsung doesn't exactly lose, Apple does win, because it makes only a handful of products, so the iPhone represents the large percentage of Apple's bottom line. Assuming Apple can continue to innovate, and can continue to capture marketshare, they will continue to enjoy wide margins, which will result in the continued production of amazing products for end-users, assuming the market pressure remains. Without the market pressures from companies like Samsung, Apple would cease to have a *need* to innovate. If all the competition folded, and ceded the market to Apple, we would start to see Apple products being release less often, with less innovation, and with less quality. Apple, like all companies, are in business to make money, not for altruism toward their customers. This unlikely scenario would allow Apple to continue making the high margins it currently enjoys, without having to spend the billions of dollars it is currently spending on R&D. The only loser in this case is the consumer buying this product, since they become locked into a high-priced product that no longer benefits from innovation. This is the disadvantage of a de facto monopoly.

All that being said, I have been an Apple iPhone user since July 2007 when I walked into an AT&T store to see what all the fuss was about with the new Apple phone. Once I realized I could get the "real" internet and not that WAP garbage that other manufacturers offered at the time, I couldn't leave the store without one. The halo-effect worked on me as well; I now have virtually all Apple products with the exception of one home computer that will eventually be replaced by an Apple.

I do enjoy seeing Apple win, but I hope the competition never goes away, because the continued innovation is a bigger victory for me than seeing Apple win the race. I want this to be a close race that never ends, with Apple always leading by a nose.
post #14 of 51

After iPhone 6 release, Android will drop below 50% because many of android users will get 5.5" iPhone.

Congratulation to Samsung Galaxy S5 for winning CNET's Best Android Phone of the Year 2014

 

"From the owner of iPhone 6+, Best Smart Phone of the Year 2014"

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Congratulation to Samsung Galaxy S5 for winning CNET's Best Android Phone of the Year 2014

 

"From the owner of iPhone 6+, Best Smart Phone of the Year 2014"

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post #15 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent McAnulty View Post

Competition, at least in terms of marketshare, it good for the consumers as it creates pressure to innovate and produce better products. That being said, I still get a lot of satisfaction over these reports of Apple quietly taking the market from Samsung and other manufacturers, precisely because these other manufacturers are so dishonest in their presentation of both their own products and of the iPhone and other Apple products. When Apple entered this market, the competition was operating on razor-thin margins, which on some level precluded serious innovation (because it costs big money in R&D to innovate), and instead depended on selling huge numbers of phones to recover their investments and make a profit. Industry leaders at the time, such as Microsoft's Steve Balmer, literally laughed at Apple when they entered the market. There were initially some corrections (such as Apple lowering the original iPhone price by $200 after only a few months), but the product was so innovative that consumers accepted the price overall, and were willing to pay the "Apple tax" to have a premium product. An interesting issue that I don't see people talk about is that Apple generated a margin of profit that did not previously exist in that market; they single-handedly redefined the ceiling for profits in the smartphone (or even cell-phone) arena and then started rapidly claiming those potential profits. The iPhone became their most successful product in history and drove Apple to the position of most profitable technology company in the world.

Eventually, Samsung came along with the Galaxy series. Since they were unable to accomplish the kind of major innovation that sway end-users to buy their product, they augmented what innovation they were able to come up with by copying designs both in hardware and software that Apple had come up with. This allowed them to produce a product that, on the surface, offered the major features of the iPhone, but at a better price than the iPhone. Ultimately, this accomplished two things: 1) it allowed them to increase their velocity in terms of gaining marketshare from competitors, primarily at the expense of Nokia and RIM (but Samsung increased their overall velocity relative to Apple), and 2) it allowed them to increase their margins overall. This was interesting, because it ate away at profits that may have otherwise gone to Apple, which emboldened Samsung and gave them increasing marketing power. Eventually, Apple sued them and inevitably won, but the ~1 billion dollar settlement (that Samsung might eventually have to pay Apple) was a relatively small price to pay for the overall increase in profits that this new tact was gaining Samsung.

The problem with Samsung's approach is that it is self-limiting. By copying Apple, they are appealing to a market that want Apple products, but, for whatever reason (usually price, but include other factors such as investment in the Android ecosystem), cannot make the commitment to buy an Apple product. As the remaining (non-Apple, non-Samsung) marketshare is claimed by these two companies, the trajectories, velocities, or whatever you wish to call it will inevitably decrease. At some point in a two-horse race, the market leaders must inevitably run out of any extra marketshare to target, and must then attempt to take marketshare directly from the other competitor. Unfortunately for Samsung, there are more people converting from Android to iOS rather than the other way around. As a result, it is inevitable that Apple will win this race, barring some significantly new innovation from a competitor (Samsung, Microsoft, Amazon, etc.). However, Samsung will, at that point, own enough of the market that their mobile product line will still be a major source of income to the company.

In the above case, Samsung doesn't lose, because it is a huge, global organization making thousands of products (everything from microwaves to Oil-tankers), and as such, the smartphone market is simply a way to increase its cash reserves for the next investment it makes. However, while Samsung doesn't exactly lose, Apple does win, because it makes only a handful of products, so the iPhone represents the large percentage of Apple's bottom line. Assuming Apple can continue to innovate, and can continue to capture marketshare, they will continue to enjoy wide margins, which will result in the continued production of amazing products for end-users, assuming the market pressure remains. Without the market pressures from companies like Samsung, Apple would cease to have a *need* to innovate. If all the competition folded, and ceded the market to Apple, we would start to see Apple products being release less often, with less innovation, and with less quality. Apple, like all companies, are in business to make money, not for altruism toward their customers. This unlikely scenario would allow Apple to continue making the high margins it currently enjoys, without having to spend the billions of dollars it is currently spending on R&D. The only loser in this case is the consumer buying this product, since they become locked into a high-priced product that no longer benefits from innovation. This is the disadvantage of a de facto monopoly.

All that being said, I have been an Apple iPhone user since July 2007 when I walked into an AT&T store to see what all the fuss was about with the new Apple phone. Once I realized I could get the "real" internet and not that WAP garbage that other manufacturers offered at the time, I couldn't leave the store without one. The halo-effect worked on me as well; I now have virtually all Apple products with the exception of one home computer that will eventually be replaced by an Apple.

I do enjoy seeing Apple win, but I hope the competition never goes away, because the continued innovation is a bigger victory for me than seeing Apple win the race. I want this to be a close race that never ends, with Apple always leading by a nose.

I believe this is the longest post in the history of AI except the article itself. Damn. No wonder you've had only 2 posts so far.

Congratulation to Samsung Galaxy S5 for winning CNET's Best Android Phone of the Year 2014

 

"From the owner of iPhone 6+, Best Smart Phone of the Year 2014"

Reply

Congratulation to Samsung Galaxy S5 for winning CNET's Best Android Phone of the Year 2014

 

"From the owner of iPhone 6+, Best Smart Phone of the Year 2014"

Reply
post #16 of 51

It's amazing how well Apple is doing with its older phone models.  

 

Apple's older models kept pace with Samsung's newest stuff.  Wow.

 

Yes it does make one wonder what's going to happen when Apple releases phones that appeal to whole new segments of the market.

 

I wish I had cash to buy more APPL.

post #17 of 51

Hey guys,

 

aren't those your tiny gains just numbers that fall into range of statistical error. It is funny to see fighting about that.

And in the world is situation different. Apple cares only about big strong markets in others countries are numbers quite different.

But I agree that iPhone 6 and discounted old models will help Apple a lot.


Edited by frantisek - 7/4/14 at 1:42am
post #18 of 51

We know how many Apple sold -- that's the only true piece of data here. The rest is a bunch of crappy consultant estimates since we have no real data from any of the others (probably because they don't want us to know the truth).

post #19 of 51

It seems like it would be more accurate to say that Apple has gained at Blackberry's expense. Apple's gain almost exactly matches Blackberry's loss. Android's flat.

 

For whatever these numbers are even worth, that is.

post #20 of 51
^^^^ Ding! Ding! Ding!
post #21 of 51
It's also interesting that MSFT stock has risen considerably since the beginning of 2013, despite the fact that this chart shows that WP OS is going absolutely nowhere.
post #22 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallenjt View Post
 

I believe this is the longest post in the history of AI except the article itself. Damn. No wonder you've had only 2 posts so far.

the TL;DR of it all:

 

Samsung, a multi-conglomerate who makes things to make money, is dominating the Android Market and is pressing at Apple's Heels at the high end in high end markets, But this competition bodes well for Apple, as it gives them a capable competitor which oils their creative machine.  

 

And Brent is a recent Apple Convert via the iPhone.

 

 

And to me...

 

Apple is doing well in the established markets, where they are the preferred 'next' smartphone, after people who bought 'a cheap smartphone, realize that dumb/feature phones and cheap smartphones aren't a value proposition anymore.

 

To me, it's all about ecosystem.  Once Samsung sells a Samsung-universe, where the IoT of their microwaves and container ships and TVs and Galaxy Phones all share a DNA that allows them to boast some level of intelligence, and have a negotiated supply of content that feeds the meter after the hardware is sold, in a manner that is complimentary to their customer's economic palate,  then they have brought their game to the point where they have eclipsed Google and are pressing Amazon and Apple for market dominance.

 

Till then, these sorts of reports are, 'who cares.'  Apple is quite happy selling everything they make to most online-consumer 30% of the world, as long as one vendor doesn't have a ecosystem that locks up 60% of the market.   While it's android and not Nokia or Microsoft,  I don't think Apple's long view was ever about controlling a majority of billions a year in handset sales.

post #23 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hexclock View Post

It's also interesting that MSFT stock has risen considerably since the beginning of 2013, despite the fact that this chart shows that WP OS is going absolutely nowhere.

Probably because Ballmer is gone.

Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
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Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
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post #24 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

To me, it's all about ecosystem.  Once Samsung sells a Samsung-universe, where the IoT of their microwaves and container ships and TVs and Galaxy Phones all share a DNA that allows them to boast some level of intelligence, and have a negotiated supply of content that feeds the meter after the hardware is sold, in a manner that is complimentary to their customer's economic palate,  then they have brought their game to the point where they have eclipsed Google and are pressing Amazon and Apple for market dominance.

Till then, these sorts of reports are, 'who cares.'  Apple is quite happy selling everything they make to most online-consumer 30% of the world, as long as one vendor doesn't have a ecosystem that locks up 60% of the market.   While it's android and not Nokia or Microsoft,  I don't think Apple's long view was ever about controlling a majority of billions a year in handset sales.

At last count... I think Samsung only has 35% of the Android market and 30% of the total smartphone market.

While they are the largest single Android vendor... there is still the other 65% of Android that is not Samsung.

Maybe Samsung could pull away from Google and create their own platform (Tizen or whatever)

That might be interesting.

But Apple's platform with only 15% of the smartphone market will still get more attention from developers, accessory makers, etc 1smile.gif
post #25 of 51
"iPhone retains smartphone lead"

You can print anything now I see even if the statement conflicts with the facts. Android still leads iphone by a significant margin, as the data in this report reflects.
post #26 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by davestall View Post

"iPhone retains smartphone lead"

You can print anything now I see even if the statement conflicts with the facts. Android still leads iphone by a significant margin, as the data in this report reflects.


Thing is, Android is not a thing. Do this, stack up all the phones sold in the US by manufacturer or model. If you do it by manufacturer, the tallest stack will be Apple. If you do it by model the two or three tallest piles will be iPhones. Now, please explain to us how the headline is misleading.

If your going to troll, at least try a bit harder.
post #27 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by tooltalk View Post
 

 

??  umm... Samsung's 0.8% growth over 3-month period is a sign that Samsung just had its "peak", but a teeny-weeny 0.6% gain is an indication of  Apple's market dominance -- or sucking up market share?  

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RadarTheKat View Post
 

 

It kinda is when you consider Samsung sells, even here in the U.S. market, a lot of cheaper phones.  So it's not exactly a battle of how much money consumers spend on each brand.  If that was the stakes, Apple would trounce Samsung by a much wider margin and would have shown a lot more growth this last quarter as well.

 

I realize there's a lot of animosity on both sides of the Samsung/Apple argument, and even though it is hard to agree on here, the reality is both Samsung and Apple are doing well.  It is at the expense of Blackberry, and Android manufacturers other than Samsung and Motorolla (who remained flat).

 

Samsung's % share is much smaller than Apples, but they grew by a larger physical amount.  Double Apples growth rate- on top of that the S5 was released in mid April... so it only got to contribute for half the time period that is covered.  It did impressively well for a phone that is basically a 'yawner' and an incremental upgrade over the S4.

 

The fact that Apple continues to grow even without a new entry is just flat out impressive too.  This was the start of the lull, since the next three month period will be 'peak lull' Apple will likely lose share or remain flat.  Don't Panic.  It's not a bad thing and is quite normal, and yes the Android fan club will be spouting victory and doom for Apple.  Then the 6 will go out and the sharp peak will give Apple a really strong gain and then Android will be the one that's 'doomed' again =)

post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallenjt View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent McAnulty View Post

Competition, at least in terms of marketshare, it good for the consumers as it creates pressure to innovate and produce better products...

I believe this is the longest post in the history of AI except the article itself. Damn. No wonder you've had only 2 posts so far.

Gee then thanks for quoting the whole thing just so we could check it!

post #29 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by davestall View Post

"iPhone retains smartphone lead"

You can print anything now I see even if the statement conflicts with the facts. Android still leads iphone by a significant margin, as the data in this report reflects.

These articles are always so confusing since they talk about a couple different things.

Apple was the best-selling smartphone manufacturer in the US... comprising 41.9% of smartphone sales in the US. The rest are as follows: Samsung 28.7%, LG 6.5%, Motorola 6.3%, HTC 5.1%

So yes... "the iPhone" is the smartphone leader in the US... since every phone Apple sells is named "iPhone"... and no other vendor sold more than Apple last quarter.

The other side of the coin is platforms. And yes.... Android is beating Apple in the US... 52.1% to 41.9%
post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
 

We know how many Apple sold -- that's the only true piece of data here. The rest is a bunch of crappy consultant estimates since we have no real data from any of the others (probably because they don't want us to know the truth).


Not to mention that court documents during the many cases of Samsung vs. Apple revealed that Samsung would flat-out lie, lie right to everyone's faces about financial reports and how their phone/tablet sales were nowhere near what they would put out there to the public.

So even if Samsung did actually provide sales data, I wouldn't believe word one of anything they say anyways.  Bunch of corrupt people in that company.

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wovel View Post


Thing is, Android is not a thing. Do this, stack up all the phones sold in the US by manufacturer or model. If you do it by manufacturer, the tallest stack will be Apple. If you do it by model the two or three tallest piles will be iPhones. Now, please explain to us how the headline is misleading.

If your going to troll, at least try a bit harder.

 I'll retype the headline here for you:  "Apple's iOS gains ground on Android in US as iPhone retains smartphone lead"  The headline is comparing IOS to Android.   And Android has a substantial lead.  Yes; Apple has more market share than Samsung, but that is not what the dramatic misleading headline says; is it?  

post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post



Not to mention that court documents during the many cases of Samsung vs. Apple revealed that Samsung would flat-out lie, lie right to everyone's faces about financial reports and how their phone/tablet sales were nowhere near what they would put out there to the public.


So even if Samsung did actually provide sales data, I wouldn't believe word one of anything they say anyways.  Bunch of corrupt people in that company.

Spot on. Apple is the ONLY company to provide honest mobile sales data. Not Amazon; not Google; not Motorola; not Samsung.

I've never understood why journalists have never pursued this aspect of the vaunted Android 'market stare' story. What's so problematic about getting these guys to report actual sales if the market share is so high!? Wouldn't they want to validate it, indeed, shout about it from the rooftops? The fact that they stop at telling us about 'shipments' says it all.
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by davestall View Post

 I'll retype the headline here for you:  "Apple's iOS gains ground on Android in US as iPhone retains smartphone lead"  The headline is comparing IOS to Android.   And Android has a substantial lead.  Yes; Apple has more market share than Samsung, but that is not what the dramatic misleading headline says; is it?  

These 'market share' numbers amount to a hill of beans.
post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by davestall View Post

 I'll retype the headline here for you:  "Apple's iOS gains ground on Android in US as iPhone retains smartphone lead"  The headline is comparing IOS to Android.   And Android has a substantial lead.  Yes; Apple has more market share than Samsung, but that is not what the dramatic misleading headline says; is it?  

No... the headline is talking about both platforms and smartphones. There are two separate statements in the headline:

1... "Apple's iOS gains ground on Android in US" (meaning as a platform Android is in the lead but iOS is gaining ground in the US)

2... "iPhone retains smartphone lead" (meaning as a smartphone the iPhone is the leader in smartphone sales)

The two halves of the headline are joined with "as" to signify that the two statements are happening at the same time.

In other words... the iOS platform is catching up to the Android platform... while simultaneously the iPhone remains the best selling smartphone.
post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post
 


As you failed to notice, Samdung released their new flagship and only got .8 percent.

 

Apple is running on phones that are several months old and pretty much matched Samdung's gains.

 

@TheWhiteFalcon:  That's pretty odd.  

 

Samsung released their new flagship in April 2014.  According to this research ending in May 2013 (or 1 month since the release), Samsung gained 0.8% and Apple 0.6%.

 

Apple released their last flagship in Sep 2013. According to the same research ending in Oct 2013 (or 1 month since the release), Samsung gained 1.2% and Apple 0.2%.   And Samsung was running on phones that were several months old and surpassed Apple's gain. 

 

Ok, so your logic doesn't seem to hold..

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrittoreSabino View Post

 


My thoughts exactly.  Samsung is the biggest competitor, by far. Their flagship just released within the past few months. This is a peak season for them. Their gains a small considering. Meanwhile, Apple sees gains at only 0.2 % less change than Samsung.  This during Samsung's peak, Apple's historically slowest quarter, only 2 current phone models from Apple, and 1 size, while Samsung blankets the market at every size.

This data sums things up obviously.  In terms of market share, Apple does more with less (2 current models, 1 screen size), pretty much equaling market share growth (and leading with marketshare per brand), with what it takes Samsung multiple models at every screen size to accomplish. 
 

 

@ScrittoreSabino:   Unlike Apple's, there is no seasonal sales peak for Samsung.  Samsung's growth in the past has been linear for the past 3-4 years -- they had consecutive 7 record revenue/profit quarters, followed by two consecutive declining recent quarters. According to Chitika, over 80% of all Samsung devices used in the US are Samsung Galaxy S2, S3, S4, S5, Note 2 and Note 3.  Apple's current lineups include Apple 4S, 5C and 5S -- so Samsung has only a few more offerings in the US that really competes with Apple's iPhones in units sold (note that neither Apple or Samsung provides sales breakdown by models).  Further I also demonstrated above that Samsung marketshare surpassed Apple's by a noticeable margin during Apple's "peak" sales season -- as defined by you. That seems to contradict everything else in your comment. 


Edited by tooltalk - 7/3/14 at 10:22pm
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

Very impressive for Apple considering this is the 'slowdown' before the storm when the iPhone 6 is released.

Wouldn't surprise me.

I was visiting family the other day and everyone who had a smartphone had an iPhone. The one person who didn't, was the daughter in a household of Apple products who had a Samsung device, and she hates the battery life on it.
post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloydbm4 View Post

black book,
You seriously can't be idiotic enough to believe the crap you just spewed? Either that, or you are unaware that there is a whole world outside the U.S.?

Take a look at Apple's worldwide market share and then ask yourself why AI only gives mention of surveys in the US, and occasionally the UK and Japan? Because those are the only 3 places in the world where Apple has any marketshare. Wake up and don't believe the propaganda. Think for yourself.

Sent from my Lumia 1520

We hear about worldwide market share all the time!

Every 3 months... to be exact.

You know... Android has 80% market share... Apple has 15% market share... Apple is doomed because of it. Blah, blah, blah...

What is rarely mentioned is that while "Android" has 80% market share... much of that is made up of garbage phones sold in developing nations.

There were 230 million "Android" phones sold last quarter... yet we only ever talk about certain flagships like Galaxy S, HTC One, LG G2, etc.

Guess what... those phones make up only a fraction of Android market share... yet they get all the press.

Why don't we explore that "Other" category? You know... those phones that retail for $80 in China and India.

There are some real gems in there 1bugeye.gif
post #38 of 51
Yes, the US is much the main home of the iPhone.

In Germany where people are more technical Android now outsells the iPhone more than 7 to 1.
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by tooltalk View Post

@TheWhiteFalcon:  That's pretty odd.  

Samsung released their new flagship in April 2014.  According to this research ending in May 2013 (or 1 month since the release), Samsung gained 0.8% and Apple 0.6%.

Apple released their last flagship in Sep 2013. According to the same research ending in Oct 2013 (or 1 month since the release), Samsung gained 1.2% and Apple 0.2%.   And Samsung was running on phones that were several months old and surpassed Apple's gain. 

Ok, so your logic doesn't seem to hold..


@ScrittoreSabino:   Unlike Apple's, there is no seasonal sales peak for Samsung.  Samsung's growth in the past has been linear for the past 3-4 years -- they had consecutive 7 record revenue/profit quarters, followed by two consecutive declining recent quarters. According to Chitika, over 80% of all Samsung devices used in the US are Samsung Galaxy S2, S3, S4, S5, Note 2 and Note 3.  Apple's current lineups include Apple 4S, 5C and 5S -- so Samsung has only a few more offerings in the US that really competes with Apple's iPhones in units sold (note that neither Apple or Samsung provides sales breakdown by models).  Further I also demonstrated above that Samsung marketshare surpassed Apple's by a noticeable margin during Apple's "peak" sales season -- as defined by you. That seems to contradict everything else in your comment. 

That contradicts data showing that only a third of Samdung's "smartphone" sales were premium devices.
Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
Reply
Too many Apple products to list...Long on AAPL, so take what I say with a bucket of salt.
Reply
post #40 of 51

The best fit logistic curve for iPhone penetration data for the past 48 months is that iPhone will saturate at 39% of the total US cellphone market (they're currently at 29.4%). This is a good fit, so it seems pretty likely.  Thus when all phones are smartphones, we expect Apple's share to be about 39% in the US, which is about what its share of smartphones is now. So as smartphones increasingly dominate (they're currently about 70% of all phones in the US), we should expect Apple's share of the additional sales to remain about constant.

 

In the world as a whole, Apple's share is currently about 15%, and worldwide smartphone penetration was about 50% last year.  So if Apple's share remains about constant in the world, then when all the phones are smartphones their worldwide sales will about double.

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  • Apple's iOS gains ground on Android in US as iPhone retains smartphone lead
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