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Video purports to show flexible sapphire display cover for Apple's 'iPhone 6'

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
With Apple said to be preparing a move from Corning's Gorilla Glass to an in-house sapphire solution for the display on the so-called "iPhone 6," a new part alleged to be a preproduction sapphire front panel for the device was shown off Monday in a video from Hong Kong.

A purported iPhone 6 display cover in a deformation test | Source: Nowhereelse.fr
A purported iPhone 6 display cover in a deformation test | Source: Nowhereelse.fr


The nearly four-minute-long video shows the panel compared against an iPhone 5, followed by a series of measurements and a deformation test showing the part's flexibility. The video's provenance is somewhat unclear, as French blog nowhereelse.fr simply credits an "anonymous retailer," though some frames do appear to finger a Hong Kong-based supplier.

When measured diagonally, the LCD opening comes in at approximately 4.7 inches, echoing previous rumors of the next-generation device's display size. The part also appears to feature the more rounded edges seen in previous leaks.



Deformed between two hands, the part shows a relatively high degree of flexibility. Though blogger Sonny Dickson -- who published the video independently and has accurately reported prerelease Apple hardware in the past -- claims that the part on display is made of sapphire, there is no confirmation that the material is indeed in use.

Apple is widely expected to split its next-generation iPhone lineup into two differently-sized handsets, with one 4.7-inch model and a larger, 5.5-inch "phablet" variant. Rumors that one or both may sport sapphire screen covers have intensified since the revelation that Apple invested more than $500 million in an Arizona sapphire facility, though it is possible that the company could have other uses for the material.
post #2 of 35
Sapphire flexes?
post #3 of 35
Sapphire cant flex... Its hardness precluded this.

Maybe some new composite?
post #4 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by blazar View Post

Sapphire cant flex... Its hardness precluded this.

Maybe some new composite?

Everything flexes to some degree so that means nothing. It is a question of how and when it breaks.

As to a composite structure that is entirely possible as a lamination of Gorila glass and Saphire would be an interesting combo. That is if there are no thermal problems with such a lamination.
post #5 of 35
Yes people, sapphire does flex. Everything flexes below some particular thickness. Diamond flexes too. Don't believe Corning's propaganda.
post #6 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by blazar View Post

Sapphire cant flex... Its hardness precluded this.

Maybe some new composite?

 

Sir Jony Ive while working with Liquid Metal and Sapphire in his lab had an accident.  The good thing is that the result was Liquid Sapphire! (drum rim shot insert here)...

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post #7 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Everything flexes to some degree so that means nothing. It is a question of how and when it breaks.

As to a composite structure that is entirely possible as a lamination of Gorila glass and Saphire would be an interesting combo. That is if there are no thermal problems with such a lamination.

I've been hoping, for years, that Apple would come up with a composite of alternating layers of diamond and soft, more flexable glass. Scientific studies have shown us how natural materials such a shells gain their amazing strength from many layers, held together with a gluelike substance.

It's not impossible, as work is being done in that area, and it could cost less than people might think. I've got some samples of vapor deposition diamond samples, one about 2 cm square. They are very thin, about 3 thou., according to my measurements, but still can't be scratched by hard objects. Though, because of the thinness. I can't press too hard. It's pretty flexable too. I figure that three layers of diamond, and four of glass, would result in a very hard, on the outside facing the world, and strong, though flexable panel that could be thinner than normal.

After all, we now coat tools with vapor deposited diamond, as well as line very high precision bearings with it. There are other uses coming on line. But I suppose something like this is still in the experimental stages.
post #8 of 35
Maybe it is sapphire. The amount deformation on Gorilla Glass test is much greater, even on the four inch screen.
post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagladry View Post

Maybe it is sapphire. The amount deformation on Gorilla Glass test is much greater, even on the four inch screen.

That's right. I seem to remember a "U" shape with that bendable Gorilla Glass.
post #10 of 35

Certainly nothing fake about that video

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post #11 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I've been hoping, for years, that Apple would come up with a composite of alternating layers of diamond and soft, more flexable glass. Scientific studies have shown us how natural materials such a shells gain their amazing strength from many layers, held together with a gluelike substance.

It's not impossible, as work is being done in that area, and it could cost less than people might think. I've got some samples of vapor deposition diamond samples, one about 2 cm square. They are very thin, about 3 thou., according to my measurements, but still can't be scratched by hard objects. Though, because of the thinness. I can't press too hard. It's pretty flexable too. I figure that three layers of diamond, and four of glass, would result in a very hard, on the outside facing the world, and strong, though flexable panel that could be thinner than normal.

After all, we now coat tools with vapor deposited diamond, as well as line very high precision bearings with it. There are other uses coming on line. But I suppose something like this is still in the experimental stages.

New word, for me, regarding diamond vapor films in Wikipedia: lipophilia. Normally, touchscreens want to be lipophobic, of course.

Very interesting field. I wasn't aware of it. Carbon rocks! My favorite element.
Edited by Flaneur - 7/7/14 at 10:59am
post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagladry View Post

Maybe it is sapphire. The amount deformation on Gorilla Glass test is much greater, even on the four inch screen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

That's right. I seem to remember a "U" shape with that bendable Gorilla Glass.

It's definitely bending less than GG2 but we don't know if it's multiple substrates and the thickness seems to be much higher than which the thinnest possible GG2 as we've seen previously.


CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 100

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post #13 of 35
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
Certainly nothing fake about that video


Nothing proven in it, either. It’s a real video, at least.

Originally posted by Marvin

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post #14 of 35
Must be a fake, one telltale test for sapphire is missing.
post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Certainly nothing fake about that video

Looks to be the real thing. Also, it seems that the material is rather stiff, more that what I would think Corning glass would be at that thinness.

If it's sapphire, this would be a big deal if they plan to make millions of them.
post #16 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


It's definitely bending less than GG2 but we don't know if it's multiple substrates and the thickness seems to be much higher than which the thinnest possible GG2 as we've seen previously.

Thanks for digging that up.
post #17 of 35
Originally Posted by knowitall View Post
Must be a fake, one telltale test for sapphire is missing.


Whether women go gaga for it?

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #18 of 35

Doesn't point further to it being sapphire? I seem to remember Corning marketing push stating the GG2 was thiner that sapphire.

Quote:

Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



It's definitely bending less than GG2 but we don't know if it's multiple substrates and the thickness seems to be much higher than which the thinnest possible GG2 as we've seen previously.


CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 100
post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Certainly nothing fake about that video

Looks to be the real thing.

Nah, it's a fake front plate. The proximity sensor is larger than the front camera, unlike current models and the camera is too high up and not in a symmetric location. They might have switched the camera and sensor positions but I doubt it. This still seems like one of those Goophone parts.
post #20 of 35
There is nothing in the video that anyone can say with any certainty the material is Sapphire. This could be any type of glass available on the market.

It is pure speculation at this point by anyone but apple to say what you are seeing in the video.

it does appear from the video the person is trying to bend the glass more than it is willing to bend, thus showing it does bend, and even if try and to get it to yield any further it will not break, which in itself is interesting.

Most glass of rigid material when it hits they yield point and you stress it further it break/shatters.

The plot just thickens at this point.
Edited by Maestro64 - 7/7/14 at 12:02pm
post #21 of 35

Sapphire flexes?!!!  But... but... but Corning said the sapphire Apple intended to use would snap like a brittle twig if someone blew on it.  What gives?  Apple supposedly can't build indestructable iPhones without Gorilla Glass 3 because Corning knows everything about display glass.  Besides, who can bend an iPhone like that?  The Hulk, Superman, The Thing?  But they probably won't be using iPhones anyway.

post #22 of 35

In order for things not to break it have to have some level of ductility, For some reason people think things have to strong and firm not to break. However, things which are ductile tend to be soft so they mark easily, and things which are hard and not easily marked, are usually very brittle. It is a balancing act that is for sure. The question is did apple solve this problem, or its partner solved the problem.

 

We all know if apple or its partner patented new material we would have all heard about it. I suspect if they did solve the problem the genius is in in the manufacturing process not the material, and if you do not want others to know it you never patent it, it becomes a trade secret.

post #23 of 35
If they make the whole phone bendable we can still operate a 5.5" single-handed: Squeeze To Touch™ ¡
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post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
 

 

Please get the entire video window visible within the original posts please! 

post #25 of 35
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

Please get the entire video window visible within the original posts please! 

 

Ah, I assume you have ClickToFlash installed, yeah? There’s nothing we can (or they will) do about it. Just download the video.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #26 of 35
That video tells me nothing about anything. Could be an Apple part with Sapphire. Could be an Apple part with Gorrilla. Could be a google phone part with neither. Could be a piece of plastic the video maker put together himself.
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post #27 of 35
Legit?

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Ah, I assume you have ClickToFlash installed, yeah? There’s nothing we can (or they will) do about it. Just download the video.

 

I'm talking about the video player not showing the right most controls due to sizing the embed window (at least that is my guess). All videos below the right advertising aside shows in full. 

 

post #29 of 35
In addition to greater strength than glass, sapphire has better electrical properties for use in capacitive touch displays and can be used in thinner sheets for even better performance.

A precision caliper gauge and scale could be used to ascertain the density of the cover to see if consistent with sapphire.
Edited by Cpsro - 7/7/14 at 5:04pm
post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


Everything flexes to some degree so that means nothing. It is a question of how and when it breaks.

As to a composite structure that is entirely possible as a lamination of Gorila glass and Saphire would be an interesting combo. That is if there are no thermal problems with such a lamination.

 

More correctly stated, `Every material has a natural level of deflection on a stress/strain curve, and dependent upon the point of failure it's measure of deflection is linear. Once it goes beyond the measure of elastic deformation, it's plasticity kicks in and failure soon follows.'

post #31 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Legit?

[/VIDEOCLIP]

Good find. Wow, looks durable!

Lol at his shirt; that was last years' number.
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post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post


Please get the entire video window visible within the original posts please! 

In order to view the whole video width you'll need to watch it on the home page of AI, which has all these nasty ads. I therefore got a subscription for their free app, but the comment section doesn't really work in that app. To make matters worse, they have removed the 'view this article on Appleinsider.com' link at the bottom of the article in the thread, so you'll have to go to the homepage and find the article yourself, which can be annoying if it's a day old and many articles are above it.

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Even though they have no Style. At all.
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post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


In order to view the whole video width you'll need to watch it on the home page of AI, which has all these nasty ads. I therefore got a subscription for their free app, but the comment section doesn't really work in that app. To make matters worse, they have removed the 'view this article on Appleinsider.com' link at the bottom of the article in the thread, so you'll have to go to the homepage and find the article yourself, which can be annoying if it's a day old and many articles are above it.

"Huddler Lifestyle"
Even though they have no Style. At all.

 

Sounds like a M$ UX to me :( 

post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

In order for things not to break it have to have some level of ductility, For some reason people think things have to strong and firm not to break. However, things which are ductile tend to be soft so they mark easily, and things which are hard and not easily marked, are usually very brittle. It is a balancing act that is for sure. The question is did apple solve this problem, or its partner solved the problem.

We all know if apple or its partner patented new material we would have all heard about it. I suspect if they did solve the problem the genius is in in the manufacturing process not the material, and if you do not want others to know it you never patent it, it becomes a trade secret.

It's complicated, because we're not really talking about extreme bendability, but rather, resistance to stress induced cracking, which isn't exactly the same thing. After all, Gorilla glass has been shown to break fairly easily. Hard also means strong. Whether that also points to brittleness relies on a number of factors such as the structure of the material, and bonding strength of the atoms.

For example, as used in tooling, tungsten carbide is more brittle than high speed steel, but it's also much stronger and harder. It will break where HSS will bend, but at the point at which HSS will bend, TC is just fine, and will break at a much higher stress level. Comparing glass to crystal is fair, but the characteristics are different.amorphous materials are very different from crystalline ones.
post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

More correctly stated, `Every material has a natural level of deflection on a stress/strain curve, and dependent upon the point of failure it's measure of deflection is linear. Once it goes beyond the measure of elastic deformation, it's plasticity kicks in and failure soon follows.'

If you really want to get technical, we should be talking about grain boundary failure
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