or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Tim Cook reportedly seeking new blood for Apple's board of directors
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tim Cook reportedly seeking new blood for Apple's board of directors - Page 2

post #41 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Algorithms were named after him for a reason. Duh¡

 

Haha.   Never saw that before.  Sounds like something Beats could run with.   Al Gore Rythms!

post #42 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

I see the head honcho of Tesla ripe for a seat at Apple. And Jean-Louis Gassée is really a wired in tech guy and a friend of Apple's.

.... Also, did anyone ever fill the seat of the Google mole on the Apple board?

Gassee has too much history with Apple, I don't think it'd be good to bring him back. And I suspect Musk would decline due to being busy.

I hear Alan Mullaly is available now, though he's not exactly young...
post #43 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyfozz View Post

Want to see that Intuit Campbell guy go and VP Gore. The others I don't know but Campbell was a friend of Steve, but he's a jerk at running Intuit and keep the Mac platform behind as far as possible. Gore? What possible contribution has he made, even if we are talking political clout. Zero.

In complete agreement - Campbell should have been ousted before Eric Schmidt of Google, his flagrant lack of support for Apple products from Intuit is unconscionable from a board member. I've not voted for Campbell on a proxy statement since the Quicken Essentials fiasco. For Gore, he's a token something (?) what he brings to the table other than Washington connections is questionable.
KennDDS
Reply
KennDDS
Reply
post #44 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KennMSr View Post

In complete agreement - Campbell should have been ousted before Eric Schmidt of Google, his flagrant lack of support for Apple products from Intuit is unconscionable from a board member. I've not voted for Campbell on a proxy statement since the Quicken Essentials fiasco. For Gore, he's a token something (?) what he brings to the table other than Washington connections is questionable.
Apparently Gore is a Google advisor as well so that's reason alone to get rid of him.
post #45 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


.... Also, did anyone ever fill the seat of the Google mole on the Apple board?

Levinson is still there isn't he? 1wink.gif
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #46 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


Apparently Gore is a Google advisor as well so that's reason alone to get rid of him.

Damn, is he really?

 

I didn't know that. Now that is definitely a good reason to dump that guy.

post #47 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

At least four times a year, in companies like Apple. The average Fortune 500 board member spends about one month worth of company-related work. Post-SOx, boards have a major say in what goes on in companies.

According to the 1997 Director Stock Option Plan each director who is not an employee is initially granted 30,000 shares of stock on their initial election and become vested in equal installments on each of the first three anniversaries on the fourth anniversary they are granted another 10,000 shares fully vested and immediately exercisable at the pre split price that's $6M before taxes. I've worked over 40 years and haven't made what these guys make for a months worth of actual work. What's worse almost everyone (except Arthur Levinson) of those board members cashes that option in its entirety the day it's granted never saving any for appreciation (where's their faith in the company they govern).

Board current ownership 2/01/14 pre-split last reported board transactions
Arthur Levinson - 162,698 (5/30/14)
Ronald Sugar - 1,718
Andrea Jung - 1,610
Robert Iger - 5,541
Al Gore. - 62,523
Millard Drexler - 1,533
William Campbell - 2,523
KennDDS
Reply
KennDDS
Reply
post #48 of 90
What Cook should have said is that he's no Steve Jobs, doesn't really have any interesting ideas or goals, and will carry the ball and collect ridiculous sums of payola, until the numbers, shareholders, or boredom force him out.
post #49 of 90
Originally Posted by photoshop59 View Post
What Cook should have said is that he's no Steve Jobs, doesn't really have any interesting ideas or goals, and will carry the ball and collect ridiculous sums of payola, until the numbers, shareholders, or boredom force him out.

 

Here. You’re welcome.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #50 of 90
"Cook looking to add"

Everyone in the comments section missed this part. Calm your balls dudes...
post #51 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


Because of what I said. Apple should have board members experienced in technology or running large corporations. But outside of politics why do you think Gore should stay?

 

Hey genius, who the hell do you think made sure DARPA, ARPANET and the rest got funding? Senator Al Gore. There is a reason he's properly credited with making the Web happen.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Gore_and_information_technology#Congressional_work_and_Gore_Bill

 

If you don't believe Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn then you truly are too dense for words.

post #52 of 90

"New Blood" as in ... we've not had many original ideas lately.  If it wasn't for Ive, we would be more like the faded Sony than Apple.

post #53 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by photoshop59 View Post

"New Blood" as in ... we've not had many original ideas lately.  If it wasn't for Ive, we would be more like the faded Sony than Apple.
I find this quote quite amusing considering there's nothing original about your posts. 1smile.gif
post #54 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Hey genius, who the hell do you think made sure DARPA, ARPANET and the rest got funding? Senator Al Gore. There is a reason he's properly credited with making the Web happen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Gore_and_information_technology#Congressional_work_and_Gore_Bill

If you don't believe Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn then you truly are too dense for words.
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10000872396390444464304577539063008406518
post #55 of 90

Nothing in your link is at odds with what the smart folks here keep trying to explain to you.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
post #56 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


Yes my argument is I think there are others that know more about technology and running large corporations. And Gore's political connections certainly didn't help Apple with the DOJ.

As far as the internet goes...http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10000872396390444464304577539063008406518

Interesting, the Internet started at PARC?  Funny how culture works. You would think this would be widely known; like the GUI being invented at PARC. 

I was just talking to a colleague who used ARPAnet in the late 70s. He was an engineering grad student at the University of Utah, which was one of three schools on ARPAnet. He said the first full resolution picture sent over ARPAnet was a naked lady.  It took forever to transfer. (brings new meaning to tantalizing). My comment to him was, "It should have been obvious how to make money on the internet." He missed the boat on that one.

post #57 of 90

Michael Hiltzik, whose book Crovitz cited, counters the WSJ article.

 

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jul/23/news/la-mo-who-invented-internet-20120723

post #58 of 90
Algorithm? What a joke: he can't dance!
post #59 of 90
Getting back to the WSJ article...it's clear that the media meme is a no-win situation for Cook. On the one hand they complain about lack of innovation and no new products, but then on the other hand they dismiss new products as not being enough to "move the needle" on Apple's $170B revenue base and find anonymous quotes from current and former Apple employees that the company is working on too many things, spreading itself too thin and losing its laser focus. Like John Gruber said, Cook is basically dammed if he does, dammed if he doesn't. Such bullshit. 1rolleyes.gif
post #60 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Hey genius, who the hell do you think made sure DARPA, ARPANET and the rest got funding? Senator Al Gore. There is a reason he's properly credited with making the Web happen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Gore_and_information_technology#Congressional_work_and_Gore_Bill

If you don't believe Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn then you truly are too dense for words.

I doubt whether Al Gore has given up on what I think is his best idea: A set of orbiting real-time observatories aimed at Earth, designed solely to give is live picture of the planet at all times, no strings, open to anyone with a screen. At least that's how I remember it. Since things like Oculus are on their way, there are obvious enhancements to be made to his original idea.

This is one reason why I think Apple has a space program in its future.

Oh yeah, and I agree with your last sentence.
post #61 of 90
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post
I doubt whether Al Gore has given up on what I think is his best idea: A set of orbiting real-time observatories aimed at Earth, designed solely to give is live picture of the planet at all times, no strings, open to anyone with a screen.

 

What’s the point? What does it do for anyone? My satellite provider has a channel dedicated to this already.

 
 This is one reason why I think Apple has a space program in its future.


You could substitute virtually any company name there and I’d be a happy man, but what’s the point to Apple? How does being the foundation for one of the asteroid mining companies help them with the integration of technology into people’s personal lifestyles?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #62 of 90

I think Gore is fine on the board, other than he is getting older and younger blood is probably needed. As to his or any other member's lack of tech background - it doesn't matter.  That is not why the board is there.

 

BTW I've always wanted to make this joke:

 

"Gore!  Klaatu barada nikto."

post #63 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The board includes seven outside directors, six of whom are over the age of 63. Four have been with Apple for more than a decade, while Intuit CEO Bill Campbell and J. Crew Group chief Millard S. "Mickey" Drexler have both served since the late 1990s.

 

Bill Campbell continues to be an embarrassment on Apple's board.  He needs to go, regardless of his previous status as FoS.  Quicken Mac products have been a cruel hoax on Mac users for far too many years.  If Campbell won't resign voluntarily, Cook needs to show him the door.

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

  MA497LL/A FB463LL/A MC572LL/A FC060LL/A MD481LL/A MD388LL/A ME344LL/A

Reply
post #64 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by ash471 View Post

Interesting, the Internet started at PARC?  Funny how culture works. You would think this would be widely known; like the GUI being invented at PARC. 
I was just talking to a colleague who used ARPAnet in the late 70s. He was an engineering grad student at the University of Utah, which was one of three schools on ARPAnet. He said the first full resolution picture sent over ARPAnet was a naked lady.  It took forever to transfer. (brings new meaning to tantalizing). My comment to him was, "It should have been obvious how to make money on the internet." He missed the boat on that one.

If you are going to be correcting things...

By the late 70s, there were over a hundred ARPANET sites. In 1969, UCLA was the first ARPANET node, followed by Stanford to create the first full ARPANET connection. Next was UC Santa Barbara and then the University of Utah was fourth, in December 1969. (See http://www.livinginternet.com/i/ii_arpanet.htm, among other sources.)
post #65 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Al Gore, may have not invented the internet (in any event, for those interested in actual facts, he was misquoted on that), but as a member of the US Congress, he pioneered some of the enabling legislation that helped advance the internet as we know it today. I am not making this up: you're welcome to educate yourself by checking it out on the internet (no less!), if you wish.

All major corporate boards have political/regulatory types on them. Apple is by no means unique in that respect. It therefore makes perfect sense for someone like Gore to be on a major board. That said, he may be past his sell-by date. I am not sure who the alternative would be, but I can see that he should perhaps go.

"Because of what [you] said"? That's laughable. You simply asserted that Gore should go without offering an argument (unless you were claiming that he knows nothing about tech, in which case, you're plainly wrong), and then said that is because of what you said!

Typical of your shallow, drive-by posting style. (Not that I expect you to change -- my guess is, you won't -- but I'll call you out on it if/when I see it).
Yes my argument is I think there are others that know more about technology and running large corporations. And Gore's political connections certainly didn't help Apple with the DOJ.

As far as the internet goes...http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10000872396390444464304577539063008406518

The Wall Street Journal's reporting on Al Gore isn't worth the paper it's printed on.

You're welcome to wallow in your ignorance (as I expected you would).
post #66 of 90

The internet took off after it was privatized. You have to look at intent. A slow, lumbering, inefficient govt. program vs. the free market, hell bent on making a profit.

 

Going back to the beginning is interesting but doesn't tell the whole story. It's only part of the story. If taken to extreme, one could say caveman was responsible for Mercedes, having invented the wheel. Or Moses had the idea of tablets and thus should be credited with inventing the iPad.

 

Ugh..meant to add that the same goes for Xerox PARC. There's a book out there but I forgot the title. It shows just how primitive the interface they developed was. I have no problem with giving Jobs the credit for revolutionizing the GUI. He had the vision and drive and took a little nugget from Xerox and turned it into the Macintosh.

post #67 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

The internet took off after it was privatized. You have to look at intent. A slow, lumbering, inefficient govt. program vs. the free market, hell bent on making a profit.

Going back to the beginning is interesting but doesn't tell the whole story. It's only part of the story. If taken to extreme, one could say caveman was responsible for Mercedes, having invented the wheel. Or Moses had the idea of tablets and thus should be credited with inventing the iPad.

Ugh..meant to add that the same goes for Xerox PARC. There's a book out there but I forgot the title. It shows just how primitive the interface they developed was. I have no problem with giving Jobs the credit for revolutionizing the GUI. He had the vision and drive and took a little nugget from Xerox and turned it into the Macintosh.

Wheel: Indo-Europeans, Central Asian steppe, c. 5000 BC. They were also first to tame and ride horses, giving the wheel something to do.

Tablet: Sumer, Mesopotamia, c. 4000 BC, about 2500 years before Moses.

Ok, you were making a bad joke, but you started out wrong by trying to take away credit from where it was due. When your government does something right, it should be acknowledged.
Edited by Flaneur - 7/8/14 at 1:55am
post #68 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

What’s the point? What does it do for anyone? My satellite provider has a channel dedicated to this already.


You could substitute virtually any company name there and I’d be a happy man, but what’s the point to Apple? How does being the foundation for one of the asteroid mining companies help them with the integration of technology into people’s personal lifestyles?

So you can watch a live view from space of an evening thunderstorm in progress over Indiana while it's also happening outside your house? Why not?

In any case, Al Gore should stay to see if his observatories will work out.
post #69 of 90
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post
So you can watch a live view from space of an evening thunderstorm in progress over Indiana while it's also happening outside your house? Why not?


Seems like a standard weather map would be more useful; there aren’t a rainbow of colors on a satellite image telling you how strong the storm is.


And for taking in the beauty of Earth from space, there are feeds down from the ISS already.

 

Though, hey, if Gore wants to waste his money setting up 1080p streams down from space so we can see said beauty better, I’m fine with that. I just don’t see what purpose it serves Apple.

 

Now asteroid mining… that serves Apple. Since they’re moving ever closer to controlling everything that goes into their devices, what better way to make a trillion dollars than to mine for the rare metals themselves instead of relying on China for anything at all!

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #70 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


Wheel: Indo-Europeans, Central Asian steppe, c. 5000 BC. They were also first to tame and ride horses, giving the wheel something to do.

Tablet: Sumer, Mesopotamia, c. 4000 BC, about 2500 years before Moses.

Ok, you were making a bad joke, but you started out wrong by trying to take away credit from where it was due. When your government does something right, it should be acknowledged.

 

Gotta love the literalists. Here's another way of looking at it: Al Gore, not so important. Steve Jobs, very important.

 

God bless the sumerians. You had to look that up. Everyone knows Moses.

 

On Gov: Can't give credit for creating the internet. Without capitalism driving that basic nugget of an idea, the net would still be languishing in the lab.

post #71 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyfozz View Post
 

Want to see that Intuit Campbell guy go and VP Gore. The others I don't know but Campbell was a friend of Steve, but he's a jerk at running Intuit and keep the Mac platform behind as far as possible. Gore? What possible contribution has he made, even if we are talking political clout. Zero.

To answer your Gore diatribe: 

Al Gore and the Internet

 

By Robert Kahn and Vinton Cerf

Dated: 28 Sep 2000

 

Al Gore was the first political leader to recognize the importance of the Internet and to promote and support its development. 

 

No one person or even small group of persons exclusively invented the Internet. It is the result of many years of ongoing collaboration among people in government and the university community. But as the two people who designed the basic architecture and the core protocols that make the Internet work, we would like to acknowledge VP Gore’s contributions as a Congressman, Senator and as Vice President.  No other elected official, to our knowledge, has made a greater contribution over a longer period of time.  

 

Last year the Vice President made a straightforward statement on his role.  He said: “During my service in the United States Congress I took the initiative in creating the Internet.”  We don’t think, as some people have argued, that Gore intended to claim he invented the Internet. Moreover, there is no question in our minds that while serving as Senator, Gore’s initiatives had a significant and beneficial effect on the still-evolving Internet. The fact of the matter is that Gore was talking about and promoting the Internet long before most people were listening.  We feel it is timely to offer our perspective.

 

As far back as the 1970s Congressman Gore promoted the idea of high speed telecommunications as an engine for both economic growth and the improvement of our educational system.  He was the first elected official to grasp the potential of computer communications to have a broader impact than just improving the conduct of science and scholarship. Though easily forgotten, now, at the time this was an unproven and controversial concept.  Our work on the Internet started in 1973 and was based on even earlier work that took place in the mid-late 1960s. But the Internet, as we know it today, was not deployed until 1983. When the Internet was still in the early stages of its deployment, Congressman Gore provided intellectual leadership by helping create the vision of the potential benefits of high speed computing and communication.  As an example, he sponsored hearings on how advanced technologies might be put to use in areas like coordinating the response of government agencies to natural disasters and other crises.

 

As a Senator in the 1980s Gore urged government agencies to consolidate what at the time were several dozen different and unconnected networks into an Interagency Network.  Working in a bi-partisan manner with officials in Ronald Reagan and George Bush’s administrations, Gore secured the passage of the High Performance Computing and Communications Act in 1991.  This Gore Act supported the National Research and Education Network (NREN) initiative that became one of the major vehicles for the spread of the Internet beyond the field of computer science.

 

As Vice President Gore promoted building the Internet both up and out, as well as releasing the Internet from the control of the government agencies that spawned it.  He served as the major administration proponent for continued investment in advanced computing and networking and private sector initiatives such as Net Day. He was and is a strong proponent of extending access to the network to schools and libraries.  Today, approximately 95% of our nations schools are on the Internet. Gore provided much-needed political support for the speedy privatization of the Internet when the time arrived for it to become a commercially-driven operation.

 

There are many factors that have contributed to the Internet’s rapid growth since the later 1980s, not the least of which has been political support for its privatization and continued support for research in advanced networking technology.  No one in public life has been more intellectually engaged in helping to create the climate for a thriving Internet than the Vice President.  Gore has been a clear champion of this effort, both in the councils of government and with the public at large.  

 

The Vice President deserves credit for his early recognition of the value of high speed computing and communication and for his long-term and consistent articulation of the potential value of the Internet to American citizens and industry and, indeed, to the rest of the world. 

 

post #72 of 90
*Raises Hand*
post #73 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post
 

As long as they don't base their decisions on "diversity" or any other forms of modern day discrimination, then I am in favor of this.

 

I've said this before, but being on the board of Apple sure sounds like winning a lottery ticket.

 

How often does the board have to meet? How many hours per year do the board members put in on average? How much of an input does the board really have?

 

I am much more in favor of a "wartime CEO", than a "peacetime CEO", but there's nothing that can be done about that since Jobs is no longer around of course, and Tim Cook has done a pretty good job so far.

Really, got to get rid of "diversity" since it's just discrimination in reverse? 

 

Let's see. Want to sell products India? Better has some diversity somewhere. How about in Brazil? Mexico, Peru, Chile, France, Italy, Greece. Turkey, Egypt, Israel. Kenya, Nigeria. Black Americans, Indian Americans, Hispanic Americans. By all means, you only need old white men -- we are born unbiased and all knowing. I know I was -- just like you. 

post #74 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KennMSr View Post


According to the 1997 Director Stock Option Plan each director who is not an employee is initially granted 30,000 shares of stock on their initial election and become vested in equal installments on each of the first three anniversaries on the fourth anniversary they are granted another 10,000 shares fully vested and immediately exercisable at the pre split price that's $6M before taxes.

 

How do you work that out?

 

30,000 x 96 = $2.88 million but as you are quoting the 1997 agreement, surely that should equate to 7 x 30,000 x $96 = $20.16 million? Even if you add another 10,000 or 7 x 10,000 shares, I still can't reach your $6m number... am I missing something? What are your workings on this?

post #75 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

Gotta love the literalists. Here's another way of looking at it: Al Gore, not so important. Steve Jobs, very important.

God bless the sumerians. You had to look that up. Everyone knows Moses.

On Gov: Can't give credit for creating the internet. Without capitalism driving that basic nugget of an idea, the net would still be languishing in the lab.

Actually, I didn't have to look anything up, it's in my head. Should be in everybody's head. I think everyone who knows how to read and who went to school should know that writing began with marks on clay tablets. And I would think that they'd have some timeline, like Mesopotamia, 3 or 4000 BC. Moses, way later in Canaan, maybe around the time of the phonetic alphabet.

Cavemen and wheels, what can I say? A 25,000-year anachronism. Too much Flintstones, not enough thinking or reading, or just bad education. You guys who want to make your ideological point by retelling a cartoon version of history like to stay ignorant so you can remove credit where credit is due.

Take a look at what waldobushman quotes about Al Gore, post #71. I'd imagine that AG is on the board because Steve Jobs recognized how important his work was in privatizing the Internet.

I remember those times very well. Business and technology news was full of stories at the time about "the information superhighway," an awkward branding effort made by Gore's staff, or he himself, to sell us on the idea of building out a privatized version of the government's Internet. And you want to take that credit away from him. Disgraceful.
post #76 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

I doubt whether Al Gore has given up on what I think is his best idea: A set of orbiting real-time observatories aimed at Earth, designed solely to give is live picture of the planet at all times, no strings, open to anyone with a screen. At least that's how I remember it. Since things like Oculus are on their way, there are obvious enhancements to be made to his original idea.

This is one reason why I think Apple has a space program in its future.

Oh yeah, and I agree with your last sentence.

Ok got to look that up. I, for one, can see immense usefulness in such an idea. You know, like, seeing what's really going on down on the surface level of the planet!
What is really factored into the price is a kind of perpetual sense of disbelief that any company could be as good as Apple is. ~Retrogusto
Reply
What is really factored into the price is a kind of perpetual sense of disbelief that any company could be as good as Apple is. ~Retrogusto
Reply
post #77 of 90
Dump Gore and bring in Musk!!!
post #78 of 90
@palomine, I hope you'll find something useful. Maybe Wired was where I was seeing the stories about the Gore plan to use space-based cameras to foster whole-Earth ecological thinking among the world population. I seem to remember he was thinking that view of the whole Earth would be the only product of such an observatory.

Nowadays, we might have other ideas we could pursue, especially if we used two satellites spaced a certain distance apart for a parallaxed stereo view, like we did with the STEREO sun observatories launched a few years ago. Those allowed for 3D views of sunstorms ejecting mass from the corona, as well as some sun surface depth view, as I recall.

I've done some turning-Earth animation in stereo, and the effect of seeing depth under the clouds is quite nice, even compelling, but then it's hard to be objective about your own stuff. I can see where a 3D live view of the whole Earth might be pleasantly hypnotic, though.
post #79 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post
 

To answer your Gore diatribe: 

Al Gore and the Internet

 

By Robert Kahn and Vinton Cerf

Dated: 28 Sep 2000

 

Al Gore was the first political leader to recognize the importance of the Internet and to promote and support its development. 

 

.......

The Vice President deserves credit for his early recognition of the value of high speed computing and communication and for his long-term and consistent articulation of the potential value of the Internet to American citizens and industry and, indeed, to the rest of the world. 

 

 

Thanks for posting this.   I don't understand all the "hate" for Gore.   A very decent man with some intellect, more than can be said for the vast majority of our other politicians.

 

But even the Kahn/Cerf document you posted won't change the minds of most people here.    They have a story in their heads and then shape the facts to meet the demands of that story.      

post #80 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post
 

 

Thanks for posting this.   I don't understand all the "hate" for Gore.   A very decent man with some intellect, more than can be said for the vast majority of our other politicians.

 

But even the Kahn/Cerf document you posted won't change the minds of most people here.    They have a story in their heads and then shape the facts to meet the demands of that story.      

Because Al Gore didn't do shit. He sponsored some bills that can be correlated with the internet, but he didn't understand ARPAnet or its significance.   His involvement is self aggrandizement after the fact by trying to make a connection to a bill he sponsored. Its rather pathetic actually.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Tim Cook reportedly seeking new blood for Apple's board of directors