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Apple patents method of building seamless all-glass iOS devices, monitors and TVs

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
Apple on Monday was granted a U.S. patent covering a method of fusing glass structures together to encapsulate the internal circuitry of an iOS device, and that of larger electronics like monitors and televisions.


Source: USPTO


The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office awarded Apple U.S. Patent No. 8,773,848 for "Fused glass device housings," which describes a procedure that allows for the efficient fabrication of seamless all-glass electronic device casings.

As noted by Apple, all-glass structures can be heavy, especially if the material is layered to protect against scratches, drops and other accidental damage. The company proposes a new construction method that ensures durability, a lightweight design and eye-pleasing aesthetics.

Instead of using a completely glass-on-glass build, Apple suggests joining glass pieces together via a fusing process. According to the patent, the edges of planar and peripheral glass members can be fused together to form a sufficiently thick piece of material that may be machined down to a desired shape. For example, the illustration below shows a media player with rounded edges and flexible display.




To bolster the casing's structural integrity, raised glass features can be fused to the planar member at weak points in the build. Examples include the addition of glass structures around holes or openings in the glass member, as well as internal support ribs placed that reduce flexing and breakage. Cutouts in the glass surface can serve as holes for buttons and other physical device controls.




In some embodiments, glass members are fused together to create a five-sided box in which displays, circuitry and other internal components can be inserted, or "slid into place." This is especially crucial for larger applications like televisions or monitors that are mounted on stands.

The back portion -- side opposite that of the display -- can be tinted a translucent color or made opaque to hide unsightly batteries, chips and flex cables, though Apple leaves an option to keep all sides transparent. Portions of planar glass members may be "roughened" to help scatter and diffuse light around display edges.

Once the internals are inserted, an end cap is placed over the opening to seal off the structure from debris and other contaminants.


Illustration of device with stand.


Finally, the patent goes into detail on polishing and glass strengthening techniques, as well as alternative embodiments that involve extruded hollow glass rods with fused end caps. Additional attention is paid to glass fusing methods that reduce frit to leave seamless joints.

With Apple's latest iOS device designs, it appears the company is moving further away from the "glass sandwich" aesthetic introduced with the iPhone 4. Combined with rumors of sapphire crystal adoption over Gorilla Glass, the patented glass fusing technology may never make its way to the consumer market. Then again, Apple does hold patents for sapphire lamination and fusion technology that could work well with today's granted IP.

Apple's seamless fused glass housing patent was first filed for in 2013 and credits Peter Russell-Clarke, Michael K. Pilliod and SVP of Design Jony Ive as its inventors.
post #2 of 33

This all makes perfect sense. If you believe the leaks on youtube re the iPhone 6 sapphire display it is strong, flexible and scratch proof. Why not then cover the whole device with sapphire. If you add wireless charging, bluetooth connectivity for headphones and magnetically coupled speakers/microphones (or at least internal vented ones so that they are sealed to the outside) then you could have a completely sealed smooth unit - very Jonny Ive! You could still have a lightning port as that can be sealed from the device, but ultimately I see Apple doing away with all external connections in order to make the phone a completely sealed monolithic slab. This would look/ feel very classy and be incredibly durable. 

 

Apple is being very strategically clever here. By developing materials that other manufacturers will find it very hard o impossible to copy at a reasonable cost or in a reasonable timeframe they are playing to their strengths. How will a plastic backed Samsung S6/7 look compared to an all sapphire iPhone? The rumoured updated S5 with a metal band around it probably won't have a metal back as where would they put the antenna? The iPhone 5s manages it only with a lot of internal engineering, way beyond what Samsung is likely to do for a midcylce upgrade of the S5. So even in the short term you are likely to see a Galaxy S5 with a metal chamfered band around it and a plastic (fake metalled?) back competing with a larger iPhone 6 with curved sapphire display - no wonder people are getting more bullish about the Apple product cycle!

 

Apple cannot win by competing on price. They can win by competing on style, marketing, engineering, integration and functionality.

style: thinner curvy sapphire coated iphone

marketing: expanded retail presence, Angela Ahrendts & other top level hires, lower the cost of entry to encourage expansion of the ecosystem with a cheaper iMac, iPod touch and MacBook Air

engineering new materials such as detailed above (+liquidmetal?). Cornering the market in sapphire to gain a competitive edge

vertical integration (iCloud Drive, Homekit, Healthkit, Webkit, Photos in the cloud, iMessage audio/video, Handoff)

IOS 8, swift, metal, touch ID

 

It seems to me TC has the same Apple laser focus as his predecessor and his bodes very well

post #3 of 33
I would love an all-Sapphire curved edge iPhone! This would look so cool. And there would be nothing blocking the antenna inside. And it would look luxurious, expensive, jewelry-like, hot and cool. Apple an also simply paint the inside of the back sapphire panel if you don't want to see the interior electronics - you can get the interior color in multiple colors as well.
post #4 of 33
Would this patent cover a sapphire all-around case? I like the dreaming shared above. But this patent seems focused on glass.

That said, maybe it's part of a bigger plan. I've noticed over time that Apple seek to have all their products match aesthetically. It first occurred to me when the white plastic iMacs came out. I thought, It looks like a giant iPod, which at the time were white polycarbonate.

So how about this: maybe the new aesthetic will be encased transparents. IWatch and iPhone will be encased sapphire (with liquidmetal?), and the larger devices will be encased glass with aluminum.

...

Sounds like the future if you ask me.
post #5 of 33

I like this idea very much.

Imagine a glass iMac with no hard drive or ports to make it even thinner, but using Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to connect to USB devices and external Hard Drive devices.

post #6 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

According to the patent, the edges of planar and peripheral glass members can be fused together to form a sufficiently thick piece of material that may be machined down to a desired shape.
...
In some embodiments, glass members are fused together to create a five-sided box in which displays, circuitry and other internal components can be inserted, or "slid into place."
...
The back portion -- side opposite that of the display -- can be tinted a translucent color or made opaque to hide unsightly batteries, chips and flex cables, though Apple leaves an option to keep all sides transparent. Portions of planar glass members may be "roughened" to help scatter and diffuse light around display edges.
...
Once the internals are inserted, an end cap is placed over the opening to seal off the structure from debris and other contaminants.
...
Finally, the patent goes into detail on polishing and glass strengthening techniques, as well as alternative embodiments that involve extruded hollow glass rods with fused end caps. Additional attention is paid to glass fusing methods that reduce frit to leave seamless joints.

 

I know the patent describes an iMac type of device, but to me it screams of the possible construction of the so-called iWatch. The device can be completely sealed by glass, and the glass can be colored/tinted/diffused. If this were made of sapphire...

 

Such a device would be perfect for a fitness watch (no worries about water or sweat) or even a high-end "smartwatch" (I hate that term but cannot think of any other alternative). Of course, it would be charged by induction.

 

Samsung could not possibly copy this within a few product generations.

post #7 of 33

1. Apple patents all-glass electronics

 

2. Apple builds all-glass eletronics

 

3. Samsung laughs at the joke-of-a US patent system, and makes one too, and gets away with it.

post #8 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post
 

1. Apple patents all-glass electronics

 

2. Apple builds all-glass eletronics

 

3. Samsung laughs at the joke-of-a US patent system, and makes one too, and gets away with it.


4. Apple rips them a new asshole :-)

post #9 of 33

I like the simple, hand drawn illustrations. These don't show any specific designs only engineering techniques, which should stand up to any challenges. Now that they have these patents, they can choose any design they want and by applying the engineering techniques, Samsung and others can't copy them because even Judge Koh can't ignore them.

post #10 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post
 

1. Apple patents all-glass electronics

 

2. Apple builds all-glass eletronics

 

3. Samsung laughs at the joke-of-a US patent system, and makes one too, and gets away with it.

Not if Apple has tech that Samsung doesn't. Patents may describe how to do a very narrow and specific set of things. They don't necessarily describe the full process of making a particular device. It would be rather easy for Apple to leave something out and the what will Samsung do? Complain that they keep failing at copying what's described in the patent? They would have to get licensing from Apple (if Apple were so inclined) to get the rest of the "secret sauce". Not how patents are supposed to work, I know, but given the state of things it could easily be done with the likes of Samsung not being able to do a damned thing about it. 

post #11 of 33

LOL come on apple, at least use a drawing program for your figures

Doodle Dice iPhone puzzle game: A fun, free physics-laden collection of dice games.  Greatest app made yet?  Perhaps young man... Perhaps.
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Doodle Dice iPhone puzzle game: A fun, free physics-laden collection of dice games.  Greatest app made yet?  Perhaps young man... Perhaps.
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post #12 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugbug View Post
 

LOL come on apple, at least use a drawing program for your figures

Why?

post #13 of 33

An all sapphire iphone would look amazing.

post #14 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugbug View Post
 

LOL come on apple, at least use a drawing program for your figures

Like I said, using a simplified drawing that doesn't show exact dimensions or shapes allows Apple to use this patent for a wide range of devices without having to patent each of them. They patented a mechanical process, not a physical design. This will become very important when copiers use this patent. They won't have a leg to stand on.

post #15 of 33

An all glass / sapphire iPhone sounds scary. Besides, it would be a pointless exercise if it required any kind of cover. If the material has enough flex to bounce without shattering or scratching... I'm all in.

 

I am all over an all glass display, iMac, television set. Perhaps a few years from now we'll be looking back at the aluminum days with nostalgia.

post #16 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post
 

Like I said, using a simplified drawing that doesn't show exact dimensions or shapes allows Apple to use this patent for a wide range of devices without having to patent each of them. They patented a mechanical process, not a physical design. This will become very important when copiers use this patent. They won't have a leg to stand on.

 

Im pretty sure you can use a drawing tool or pages or keynote to draw a 3d cube without dimensions.

Doodle Dice iPhone puzzle game: A fun, free physics-laden collection of dice games.  Greatest app made yet?  Perhaps young man... Perhaps.
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Doodle Dice iPhone puzzle game: A fun, free physics-laden collection of dice games.  Greatest app made yet?  Perhaps young man... Perhaps.
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post #17 of 33
Has Apple ever been granted a patent before where they opted for a freehand sketch instead of something a draftsman would've created? I consider this a very different patent illustration for Apple. IMO, "vaguer" is better.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #18 of 33
It seems this technology would be more useful on iWatch than iPhone, because watches are more exposed to the elements (or worn in the shower) than smartphones, which are stored in pockets and purses most of the time.
post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugbug View Post

Im pretty sure you can use a drawing tool or pages or keynote to draw a 3d cube without dimensions.
You may not be that familiar with patent filing requirements or with patent strategies for increasing protection or maybe your desire for "pro" or "pretty" trumps all that, but I suspect Apple has resources and foresight to file in the most effective way. This was a smart move IMO for a forward thinking patent.
post #20 of 33

I have over a dozen patents, I'm familiar with the process :)  A straight line drawn by hand or someone in powerpoint does not reveal anything more.

Doodle Dice iPhone puzzle game: A fun, free physics-laden collection of dice games.  Greatest app made yet?  Perhaps young man... Perhaps.
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Doodle Dice iPhone puzzle game: A fun, free physics-laden collection of dice games.  Greatest app made yet?  Perhaps young man... Perhaps.
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post #21 of 33
So this would then be for iPhone >= 7? Or what about the meta backs circulating?

I would agree that it would be a cool for the "iWatch".
Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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post #22 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkanaga View Post
 

This all makes perfect sense. If you believe the leaks on youtube re the iPhone 6 sapphire display it is strong, flexible and scratch proof.

 

There's still no proof that's Sapphire glass at this point.

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Has Apple ever been granted a patent before where they opted for a freehand sketch instead of something a draftsman would've created? I consider this a very different patent illustration for Apple. IMO, "vaguer" is better.
Jony Ive is listed as one of the investors on the patent. He says he's terrible at drawing so maybe these are his sketches. 1biggrin.gif Plus this isn't a design patent, it's a utility patent so perhaps the drawings don't have to be as precise.
post #24 of 33
Paves the way for this design, no?
You can't spell appeal without Apple.
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You can't spell appeal without Apple.
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post #25 of 33

Maybe everyone has already seen this, but here's a You Tube video of the actual 4.7" iPhone6 sapphire screen cover undergoing a torture test.

 

Pretty impressive when he steps on one end and tries to break it by lifting the other with his hand. Brittle my a$$ - this is dang impressive!

post #26 of 33

It is hard for me to believe that this hand drawn sketches are from Apple's USPTO submission - Lack of dimensions or not!

post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post
 

I like the simple, hand drawn illustrations. These don't show any specific designs only engineering techniques, which should stand up to any challenges. Now that they have these patents, they can choose any design they want and by applying the engineering techniques, Samsung and others can't copy them because even Judge Koh can't ignore them.

 

Shrewd observation. Something they should have learned a decade prior.

post #28 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarenDino View Post

I like this idea very much.


Imagine a glass iMac with no hard drive or ports to make it even thinner, but using Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to connect to USB devices and external Hard Drive devices.

No way. I'll take security over wireless convenience. This is a fundamental misunderstanding of how computers work. USB3 has 5gbits of bandwidth. PCIe Hard drives are being used on the Macbook, MacPro and iMac push around 8Gbits. 802.11ad is 6.75Gb, and that is an awful lot of extra radio circuity for something that is going to be less than 2 meters away.

Point of reference, AP's bleed out and can be eavesdropped from more than 1km away. Even though their rated outdoor distance is like 115 meters. Encryption or not.

Wireless is for convenience, not replacement, of secure high bandwidth cost-effective approaches.

Anyhow. An all-glass/all-sapphire chassis for an iPod/iPhone is viable because it's impractical to build connectors to fit on the device. Everything else is too heavy and fragile.

iMac's, Monitors and TV's that are all-glass have a different practical use because they are often installed and not repeatedly moved. Rather they are connected to Switch/Hubs for ports and all the wear is against those.
post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarenDino View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post
 

1. Apple patents all-glass electronics

 

2. Apple builds all-glass eletronics

 

3. Samsung laughs at the joke-of-a US patent system, and makes one too, and gets away with it.

 

4. Apple rips them a new asshole :-)

 

 

5. Forum trolls post "Apple should innovate, not litigate."

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by radster360 View Post
 

It is hard for me to believe that this hand drawn sketches are from Apple's USPTO submission - Lack of dimensions or not!

 

Who says USPTO won't accept drunken submissions scrawled on bar napkins?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #31 of 33
this would be waterproof

Long FB, AMZN
Schlong AAPL

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Long FB, AMZN
Schlong AAPL

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post #32 of 33

The entire staff of iFixIt just had nervous breakdowns.

post #33 of 33
Originally Posted by alcstarheel View Post
Paves the way for this design, no?

 

No. The only bangles I want mashed are women’s on me. Something like this is useless to anyone.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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