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Mac sales continue to slide in Q2 as overall PC market rebounds [Update: Numbers refuted]

post #1 of 128
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Apple's share of the U.S. computer market slipped again during the second quarter of 2014 despite a global trend towards growth in the PC marketplace after tablets like the iPad cannibalized sales.


Source: IDC


According to IDC's preliminary results for the most recent June quarter, Apple continued to bleed marketshare in the U.S. PC industry, ending the three-month period as the only top-five PC vendor to have ceded ground year-to-year.

Update: Apple's officially released sales figures for the quarter state that the company's Mac sales actually increased by 18 percent globally as the overall PC industry remained stagnant. Apple's chief executive Tim Cook also stated the company had "achieved strong double digit Mac growth across many countries, including the U.S.," indicating that IDC and Gartner's estimates were incorrect and that Apple continues to outpace the overall conventional PC market, even when including Windows tablet shipments but not iPad sales.

For the quarter, Apple held 10 percent of the market on shipments of about 1.68 million Macs, down from 10.9 percent in the year ago period. The company's growth shrunk 1.7 percent year-over-year, leaving Apple in fourth place behind HP, Dell and Lenovo.

IDC data had HP leading the U.S. market with a 27.3 percent share on 4.6 million unit shipments, up 2.1 points from 2013. Second-place Dell also showed gains, moving from a 24.3 percent marketshare in 2013 to 25.7 percent in the three months ended June. Year-to-year growth for HP and Dell stood at 15.6 percent and 12.9 percent, respectively.

Lenovo's share of the market hit 11.5 percent on 1.9 million shipments, up from 9.8 percent last year. The Chinese company exhibited the highest growth out of the top-five OEMs, jumping 24.7 percent year-over-year. Rounding out the top-five, Toshiba managed to clear the one million units shipped milestone to claim 6.1 percent of the market. Growth was strong over the three-month period, adding up to a 20.6 percent change from last year.

Spurring the strong PC market performance were businesses looking to replace aging computers running Microsoft's Windows XP, which is no longer supported by the software giant, IDC says. On the consumer side, low-end computers like Chromebooks drove sales to help even out cannibalization from tablet devices.

"The better than expected results seem to arise from two places. One encouraging factor was a good intake of lower-end systems, including Chromebooks, which coincides with the recent slowing in tablet growth and perhaps signals the beginning of some stabilization on the consumer side," said Jay Chou, Senior Research Analyst at IDC's Worldwide PC Trackers. "In addition, a sizable number of PCs are still running Windows XP and the impetus to upgrade them continued to boost shipments in the second quarter."


Source: Gartner


A separate report from Gartner also put Apple as the fourth-place PC vendor in quarter two, with a 10.6 percent share of the market on shipments nearing 1.7 million. That figure is down from the same time last year, when Apple shipped about 1.68 million Macs to take an 11.5 percent marketshare. The research firm corroborated IDC's report by noting Apple as the only top-five PC maker to post negative growth year-over-year, dipping 1.3 percent from 2013.

Gartner's report also claims HP, Dell and Lenovo took the top-three spots, with share of 27.7 percent, 26 percent and 11.5 percent, respectively. Lenovo was seen as the largest driver of growth being up 20.3 percent year-to-year, though HP was close behind with 15.5 percent followed by Dell's 12.3 percent growth. Toshiba was named as the fifth-place finisher for the second quarter, netting 6.4 percent of the market on over 1 million unit shipments, up from 5.8 percent in 2013. The Japanese company exhibited second-highest growth at 18.5 percent.

There is a disparity between the two reports, however, as IDC found the U.S. PC market to have grown 6.9 percent year-over-year, while Gartner puts the number closer to 7.4 percent. Gartner points out that its data is limited to desk-based PCs, notebooks and Ultramobile Premium, the latter of which includes Windows 8 tablets. Lower-end devices like Chromebooks and other tablet were disregarded.

On a global scale, IDC said PC shipments fell 1.7 percent, though performance was better than expected, meaning the market may be leveling off. As for Gartner, the firm found worldwide shipments actually grew 0.1 points from 2013 on an unusually strong performance from HP.
post #2 of 128

Who cares? The Mac has never been in a marketshare war and never will be. In terms of bottom line, it's almost irrelevant. I expect Macs will get a boost once hardware and software is updated this fall, not to mention the increased halo effect from the better synergy between iOS8 and Yosemite. 

post #3 of 128
"...a sizable number of PCs are still running Windows XP and the impetus to upgrade them continued to boost shipments..."

And Windows 8 will be "good enough" for businesses for then next 14 or 15 years.
Despite Microsoft releasing Windows 9, Windows 10, ad nauseam.

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post #4 of 128
It's all about cost. Macs are perceived to be too expensive. Few consider total through life costs.
post #5 of 128
Those numbers are totally wrong. Apple has been shipping about 4 million macs, quarter after quarter, for years.
post #6 of 128
Is this corporate purchases beginning to pick up? I struggle to think why people would by a Windows machine for personal use in this day and age. Granted, I am biased and live in an Apple dominated computer world. I know very few people that use PC's. It used to be very different.

When Apple brings out its IOS driven clamshell Air, life will change forever, once again. Believe it.
post #7 of 128
The growth number is a concern more than total market share. Yes, PC manufacturers sell more machines at lower prices and margins more often to the same customers. Market share of sales doesn't necessarily equal market share of users because of that.

However, when Apple's sales are falling year over year, and the market is increasing shipments year over year, it means Apple is losing ground. This is a shift from a few years ago when they were consistently gaining ground.

Now, what may be happening is that the gains from the last few years with new users are holding on to their existing machines longer (as mac users tend to do) so we're now re-stabalizing.
post #8 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

"...a sizable number of PCs are still running Windows XP and the impetus to upgrade them continued to boost shipments..."

And Windows 8 will be "good enough" for businesses for then next 14 or 15 years.
Despite Microsoft releasing Windows 9, Windows 10, ad nauseam.

I strongly doubt that. Any business worth its IT department, advisor, consultant or in-house semi-geek knows the even rule: Microsoft does bad odd-number OSes, and worse even-number OSes. So tmo, it's "Windows 7/9 will be 'good enough'", rather than 8.

 

You're welcome to correct me if you have other information, but anything by IDC or Gartner doesn't count, obviously. *They* think iPad is probably finally going to come out of that unexpected turn of events where fools accidentally bought them en masse.

 

Also, since the forum ate my previous post, this is sleazy accounting. A ChromeBook (and all these things) is hardly "a PC". Should we also count in the Raspberries? This is pretty oriented accounting too, and should include iPads therefore since they're the primary PC of many people, which would tilt the balance towards Apple.

 

I would be MUCH more interested in a comparison on decent devices... but then again, I can't seem to find a non-Apple decent device for a price point I can afford without assembling it myself.

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

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post #9 of 128
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

Who cares? The Mac has never been in a marketshare war and never will be. In terms of bottom line, it's almost irrelevant. I expect Macs will get a boost once hardware and software is updated this fall, not to mention the increased halo effect from the better synergy between iOS8 and Yosemite. 

 

Still, Apple makes 35% to 45% of all profits in the PC industry, depending on who you read.

Not bad for a single company with only 5 PC lines.

(Mac mini, iMac, Mac Pro, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, in case anyone needed a refresher.)

 

Sources:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/192273/article.html

http://fortune.com/2013/04/16/pie-chart-of-the-day-apples-oversize-share-of-pc-profits/

http://www.infoworld.com/t/macbooks/pcs-decline-its-apple-thats-making-real-money-pcs-216573

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post #10 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by DogCowabunga View Post

Those numbers are totally wrong. Apple has been shipping about 4 million macs, quarter after quarter, for years.

These are numbers for U.S. sales only. You're speaking of worldwide sales, which Apple quotes during their earnings call. 

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post #11 of 128
Well, in Apple's case people bought the upgraded hardware last year. The Mini is likely not moving due to most people waiting for them to get off their butts and upgrade it. And sales might be weaker this holiday due to Broadwell being delayed, causing people to wait until 2015.
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post #12 of 128

Wait they are reporting and making claims on number which the industry has yet to report out on. WoW this guys are wonderful that able to tell us what happen before the companies who actually know for sure have told anyone. I wonder who is their sources are of this insider information I think someone should call the SEC for sharing insider information before the company themselves make it public.

post #13 of 128

Count me as one of those people that have not bought a replacement iMac (mine's a late 2009) until I see the next refresh.

post #14 of 128
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post
 

I strongly doubt that. Any business worth its IT department, advisor, consultant or in-house semi-geek knows the even rule: Microsoft does bad odd-number OSes, and worse even-number OSes. So tmo, it's "Windows 7/9 will be 'good enough'", rather than 8.

 

LOL.  I seem to recall that the predecessor to Windows 7 was called "Windows Vista."  Not Windows 6.

So that even / odd theory is too new for any "IT department, advisor, consultant, or in-house semi-geek" to trust yet.

 

Oh, sure, the internal designation for Windows Vista was Windows 6.0.  Yeah, knew that.  Even number.

But the internal designation for Windows 7 was "Windows 6.1."  Kinda like a bug-fix release would be designated.

Here it is from the horse's mouth:

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-windows_programs/is-microsoft-windows-7-the-same-as-windows-61/1fe12fe6-5c10-4926-89d3-249e8cabc06f

So what does that do to the even / odd theory?

 

Originally Posted by lightknight View Post
 

You're welcome to correct me if you have other information, but anything by IDC or Gartner doesn't count, obviously. *They* think iPad is probably finally going to come out of that unexpected turn of events where fools accidentally bought them en masse.

 

Agreed.  Is IDC still calling iPad a "media tablet"?  Are they still trying to pretend that it's not cannibalizing PCs?

Are they still trying to ignore the post-PC era?  Ignoring it and hoping it just goes away sure didn't work for Microsoft.

Ask Ballmer.

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post #15 of 128
IDC statistics. Ignored.
post #16 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

Who cares?

 

I do. Apple has been known to drop stuff that isn't profitable enough, i.e. even though it makes money, it doesn't make ENOUGH money. If the Mac continues to slide, it won't be long before Tim says "screw it" and focusses the company's attention on just being the preeminent mobile manufacturer. I don't wanna go back to using Windows.

 

I agree with those who suggest that price is a factor. I'm hanging onto an aging machine even though I'd kinda like stuff like USB3 and solid-state storage just because the cost of entry is so bloody high. I use the machine for content creation so the Air, with its little screen and comparatively anemic guts, isn't a good option. By the time I load up a new one with comparable guts I'm up over three grand (pushing four after AppleCare and tax).

 

Now let's say Apple put a little less Excellentium into each model. That would have two benefits for Apple. First, my aging machine would have failed by now, forcing me to buy a new one. Second, the price of a new one would not be so high that I would have waited this long and would already HAVE a new one (maybe even two by now).

 

I know it's not a popular opinion, but I honestly think Apple's pricing strategy WRT Macs is self-destructive. I can't prove it without convincing Apple to try my approach though, so I guess we'll never know.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post
 

Still, Apple makes 35% to 45% of all profits in the PC industry, depending on who you read.

Not bad for a single company with only 5 PC lines.

(Mac mini, iMac, Mac Pro, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, in case anyone needed a refresher.)

 

Sources:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/192273/article.html

http://fortune.com/2013/04/16/pie-chart-of-the-day-apples-oversize-share-of-pc-profits/

http://www.infoworld.com/t/macbooks/pcs-decline-its-apple-thats-making-real-money-pcs-216573

 

That information is a year-and-a-half old (four years in the case of the first link). According to today's article that's no longer true. That's the point.

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post #17 of 128
Sounds like a lot of people made poor decisions
post #18 of 128

Oh, the US market.  Of course!   Never mind, dudes, never mind.

post #19 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post
 

 

I do. Apple has been known to drop stuff that isn't profitable enough, i.e. even though it makes money, it doesn't make ENOUGH money. If the Mac continues to slide, it won't be long before Tim says "screw it" and focusses the company's attention on just being the preeminent mobile manufacturer. I don't wanna go back to using Windows.

 

First off, they are not going to ditch the Mac: end of story.  The Mac is a critical piece to the puzzle, and here is why: Developers. In order for the IOS system to work, it needs its 3rd party developers to continue making those great apps/games for iOS.  And what do you think they are using to make those awesome apps/games for iOS: the Mac.  So, while the Mac line will never be as profitable as the iOS line or the iTunes line, it is a very crucial part of it.

 

Also, before someone mentions that you can use things like Titanium ox Xamarin to create iOS apps, I would strongly suggest you go look at it.  It is designed to be create once - deploy everywhere kind of tools, and those tools do not produce the best kind of optimized code to create the awesome apps/games for iOS.

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post #20 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post
 

 

I do. Apple has been known to drop stuff that isn't profitable enough, i.e. even though it makes money, it doesn't make ENOUGH money. If the Mac continues to slide, it won't be long before Tim says "screw it" and focusses the company's attention on just being the preeminent mobile manufacturer. I don't wanna go back to using Windows.

 

I agree with those who suggest that price is a factor. I'm hanging onto an aging machine even though I'd kinda like stuff like USB3 and solid-state storage just because the cost of entry is so bloody high. I use the machine for content creation so the Air, with its little screen and comparatively anemic guts, isn't a good option. By the time I load up a new one with comparable guts I'm up over three grand (pushing four after AppleCare and tax).

 

Now let's say Apple put a little less Excellentium into each model. That would have two benefits for Apple. First, my aging machine would have failed by now, forcing me to buy a new one. Second, the price of a new one would not be so high that I would have waited this long and would already HAVE a new one (maybe even two by now).

 

I know it's not a popular opinion, but I honestly think Apple's pricing strategy WRT Macs is self-destructive. I can't prove it without convincing Apple to try my approach though, so I guess we'll never know.

 

 

That information is a year-and-a-half old (four years in the case of the first link). According to today's article that's no longer true. That's the point.

 

Don't be ridiculous...The Mac is not going away anytime soon. 

 

Apple would never not put excellence into anything it releases. This isn't how Apple does things and never will be. Your argument there is nonsense...why would Apple make a Mac that would be designed to fail and/or go out of date faster so it sells more Macs and risk its reputation? In today's world, its actually the opposite which is I think one reason why you may see a decline in Mac sales. When you buy a Mac, there's no need to replace it all the time and Apple is supporting older Macs with the newest OS X releases very well. 

 

Price has never really been a factor for Apple, even in 2007-2008 when the economy was in the crapper for everyone, Apple was still selling record amounts of Macs and all Apple products in general. People know what they're buying. This deal where people think Macs are expensive may be there, but its not the majority in today's world. I think Apple has done a great job explaining the benefits of owning a Mac vs a PC. 

 

So with Macs being more reliable, and upgradable from an OS X stand point, and Apple really hasn't given anyone a reason to upgrade lately, I think this is the real reason why sales may be declining a little. Were also in an era where mobile devices such as iPads are going to outsell Macs as more and more people are just using an iPad for everyday work, making the Mac not necessary. 

 

So the Mac isn't going away. The apps aren't going to come out of thin air for iOS devices. I don't see Apple making Xcode for iOS anytime soon. 

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post #21 of 128
So they are counting Windows tablets and not iPads? What kind of data manipulation is going in here.
post #22 of 128

This is what happens when you don't release new products.  I agree that the decline may turn around, and it may even be a good strategic move for Apple to keep from saturating the market, by instead focusing on big-bang style launches vs less exciting incremental releases.

 

But effective or not as a marketing strategy, these interim periods are miserably dull, and the these earning reports show it.

post #23 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Jojade View Post


Now, what may be happening is that the gains from the last few years with new users are holding on to their existing machines longer (as mac users tend to do) so we're now re-stabalizing.
Guilty as charged. I have four Macs, the newest of which is a 2006 iMac. I run Logic 9 on my G5, and my first gen Mini is hooked up to the TV. Yeah, time to upgrade 1smile.gif
post #24 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

I strongly doubt that. Any business worth its IT department, advisor, consultant or in-house semi-geek knows the even rule: Microsoft does bad odd-number OSes, and worse even-number OSes. So tmo, it's "Windows 7/9 will be 'good enough'", rather than 8.
And absolutely nobody in any of those professions worth a grain of salt as an employee is going to base future decisions on that not entirely accurate fallacy. What will determine, in the future, whether businesses upgrade from whatever they're jumping to will be whether existing machines can handle the new operating system, whether existing software can handle the new operating system, and ultimately, whatever costs and benefits are associated with that upgrade.
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post #25 of 128
Not sure if I understand the data. Is Apple getting dinged by not counting iPads as PCs while Windows 8 tablet form factor PCs do get counted as PCs?

The bottom line is that no matter what these self appointed geniuses and stats monkeys spew it only comes down to one measure: at the end of the quarter who's crating the biggest load of cash over to their banker.

These guys are just turd polishers if they're not letting the financials speak for themselves.
post #26 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post
 

Price has never really been a factor for Apple, even in 2007-2008 when the economy was in the crapper for everyone, Apple was still selling record amounts of Macs and all Apple products in general.

 

With due respect, what happened in 2007 is irrelevant. What's happening NOW is that sales are declining. They are NOT selling "record numbers." They are selling less than they did last year, and are experiencing decline while other computer makers are seeing growth.

 

To those who think the declines may be due to hold-outs waiting for updates, how many "typical" Apple buyers do you think even KNOW what kind of CPU (or RAM or storage bus) is in their computer? I'd guess "not many." That means there's some other reason that fewer people are buying Macs while MORE are buying PCs. I think that reason is price.

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post #27 of 128
This is bad news. They need to update the Mini. 2 years is an absurd amount of time to be selling the same product.
post #28 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post
 

 

With due respect, what happened in 2007 is irrelevant. What's happening NOW is that sales are declining. They are NOT selling "record numbers." They are selling less than they did last year, and are experiencing decline while other computer makers are seeing growth.

 

To those who think the declines may be due to hold-outs waiting for updates, how many "typical" Apple buyers do you think even KNOW what kind of CPU (or RAM or storage bus) is in their computer? I'd guess "not many." That means there's some other reason that fewer people are buying Macs while MORE are buying PCs. I think that reason is price.

 

Its only irrelevant because it invalidates your piss-poor argument that Macs are too expensive. First of al, we don't know for a fact that sales are declining. This company that is typically WRONG is estimating Apple is losing sales and neglects to add in iPads as computer sales when they did for every other manufacturer in the list. That being said, maybe they are, but on the flip side, they're not losing customers. If they're simply not upgrading, then they're purchasing iPads instead which is where the future is going. We all know that. There isn't going to be this magical day where everyone decides to go back to computers again. 

 

The price of Apple's products is the same as its always been. Its not like people are just saying Macs are too expensive. I'd like to see some proof there. Show me an article, or survey that shows people aren't buying Macs because they're too expensive. 

 

Its more like you're just pissing and moaning because you don't want to spend the money to buy a new Mac because YOU perceive them to be too expensive. 

 

Bottom line, the Mac isn't going away and its very silly to think it is any time soon. While were heading for tablets and other mobile products in the future, there's still plenty of reasons to get a computer today. Until the day comes when these mobile devices fully replace the need for consumers to not buy them at all people will always purchase computers. 

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post #29 of 128
One of reasons why Apple isn't on a constant massive upgrade cycle is that they control both the hardware and the software. Apple can continue to add value through software that doesn't require you to purchase a new hardware unit.

Too many PC users have been scarred for life by the WIntel duopoly. It was not a coincidence that Windows continued to get ginormous, slow, and bloated over its lifetime. This was by design and intended to preserve the partnership between Microsoft and (mostly) Intel. Microsoft created a constant necessity to upgrade and keep the cycle going. It's not like they even tried to keep Windows efficient. This burned them when they tried to move to new platforms and ended up resorting to a spastic and fractured OS portfolio with stuff like Windows CE, Windows Handheld Edition, a couple versions of Windows Embedded, two generations of phone operating systems, Windows 95 and NT at the same time, and our favorite pretty schizophrenic OS Windows 8 in two versions. I won't even get into the Alpha chip versions of Windows. That's a huge dogs breakfast of OS kibbles and bits and they are not done yet! No wonder the hardware vendors had a field day with that target rich environment.

Apple is much more sensitive to hardware-software coupling which is why you can still use 5+ year old Macs productively. The convergence around OSX and iOS which is a derivative of OSX is one of the crowning achievements of Apple and a main reason why Macs retain their value for so long. This software move by Apple was pure genius and I have no doubt that Bill G feels exactly the same way since he was totally blown away by how quickly Apple ported OSX to x86.
post #30 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Is this corporate purchases beginning to pick up? I struggle to think why people would by a Windows machine for personal use in this day and age. Granted, I am biased and live in an Apple dominated computer world. I know very few people that use PC's. It used to be very different.

When Apple brings out its IOS driven clamshell Air, life will change forever, once again. Believe it.

 

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post #31 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

Count me as one of those people that have not bought a replacement iMac (mine's a late 2009) until I see the next refresh.

Lots of people are waiting on Apple to do a decent upgrade to all of its Mac products. here are a few things Apple has done that are worthless:

1. made the iMac thinner
2. made the iMac next to impossible to upgrade.
3. ignored the Mini and the fantastic potential the latest chips could have on that platform.
4. updated the AIR and didn't bother to update the SSD to higher capacity devices at each price point. This actually boggles the mind.
5. left the line up in limbo with some platforms supporting TB fully and others not.
6. ignored competing i86 hardware that would have been a good fit in the Mini.
7. ignored the display market.
post #32 of 128

I think next year @ TSMC 16nm will be the time to switch over to their own CPU.

 

By doing so Apple could cut their price by at least $150 without affecting profit margin. And actually earn a lot more in the higher end since CPU / GPU cost could remain the same.

 

With the help of Windows 8, iPad and iPhone Apps Ecosystem, as well as serious gaming on consoles and casual gaming on iOS devices, there is less and less reason to stick with x86.   

post #33 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post
 

 

Still, Apple makes 35% to 45% of all profits in the PC industry, depending on who you read.

Not bad for a single company with only 5 PC lines.

(Mac mini, iMac, Mac Pro, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, in case anyone needed a refresher.)

 

Sources:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/192273/article.html

http://fortune.com/2013/04/16/pie-chart-of-the-day-apples-oversize-share-of-pc-profits/

http://www.infoworld.com/t/macbooks/pcs-decline-its-apple-thats-making-real-money-pcs-216573

 

Thats my point. "Marketshare" is almost irrelevant in the PC space, because Macs are not even competing in the price bracket of 80% of PCs out there. The VAST majority of PC sales are sub $1000 machines, which Apple does not play in- so making the marketshare comparison is brain-dead. Also, Apple is shipping SO many more iOS devices per year, which obviously are cannibalizing Mac sales, especially iPads. 

post #34 of 128
Please mind the context which is Microsoft Windows computer manufacturers have had declining sales for years while Apple's sales were growing continuously for many years. Microsoft Windows computer manufacturers need many years of growth to regain their market positions prior to 2005.
post #35 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

 

I do. Apple has been known to drop stuff that isn't profitable enough, i.e. even though it makes money, it doesn't make ENOUGH money. If the Mac continues to slide, it won't be long before Tim says "screw it" and focusses the company's attention on just being the preeminent mobile manufacturer. I don't wanna go back to using Windows.

 

 

Yeah, Tim signed off on yearly OSX updates just like iOS, and the last WWDC showed that they're putting a shitload of effort into OSX improvements and new features, which clearly means that they're on the way to completely dropping the platform, right? If anything, the Mac has gotten much MORE attention lately, not less. 

 

Also, do you know WHY iOS devices are so popular? Apps. Do you know what platform the vast majority of these apps are developed on (especially the high quality ones)? Macs. There's your #1 reason why the Mac isn't going anywhere. And that's not even dwelving into the fact that Macs are so prominent and popular in the professional creative market, content creation, video editing, music creating, art, education, etc. Macs don't need to approach the popularity and profit of iOS devices in order for their existence to be justified and necessary. People have been concern-trolling the disappearance of the Mac since the iPhone was unveiled in 2007. It's not closer to happening now then it did back then, that much should be obvious. All the attention they put in the 30th anniversary stuff is not something they would do to a platform they plan on obsoleting. 

post #36 of 128
Apple definitely cares about units and marketshare. They can only continue to invest in MacOS if they can amortize the cost across a large number of units. In other words, Mac sales fund MacOS development. I think Apple has done a good job, with the MacBook Air (display resolution notwithstanding) they need to get much more aggressive with other models. While PC's are no longer a growth market they still generate a ton of revenue and fair amount of margin for the top vendors.
post #37 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


Lots of people are waiting on Apple to do a decent upgrade to all of its Mac products. here are a few things Apple has done that are worthless:

1. made the iMac thinner
2. made the iMac next to impossible to upgrade.
3. ignored the Mini and the fantastic potential the latest chips could have on that platform.
4. updated the AIR and didn't bother to update the SSD to higher capacity devices at each price point. This actually boggles the mind.
5. left the line up in limbo with some platforms supporting TB fully and others not.
6. ignored competing i86 hardware that would have been a good fit in the Mini.
7. ignored the display market.


1.  I love the thin design.  I like that Apple cares about appearance, as well as what goes inside.  I have zero problem with it.  In addition, it's lighter, uses less resources, and on the logistics level, saving weight, packaging, etc. means less fuel burned shipping that stuff everywhere in the world.

2. Most people will never upgrade their iMac once it's on their desk.  That's the reality.  The 27" iMac can upgrade memory easily.  Everything else (including memory on the smaller iMac) can be done by spending the extra 10 minutes opening the front and most likely, never open the unit again.  It's a non-issue.  I did it on my iMac a year ago.  It is totally doable with patience.  From start-to-finish, I upgraded the SSD on my 2009 iMac in 30 minutes.  Done.

3.  I agree on the Mini.  I contemplated getting one for the office so I don't have to carry my laptop anymore.  Why Apple is not doing anything with it is beyond me, and I'm not going to buy what I consider to be a product with "obsolete" hardware.  What a shame.

 

4. The AIR has 512GB SSD PCIe drives that are wickedly fast.  That's a lot of space for most people that the AIR caters to.  What size are you hoping for?  SSD prices when they go above that size really start getting pricey.

5. I'm bummed that they haven't upgraded everything to TB 2.0.  I wonder if they are keeping that exclusive to the Mac Pro.  That's the other reason I wait for the next iMac refresh.  

 

6.  The mini is definitely rotting on the vine.  I hope they do something soon on it.  I would still consider getting one if they do.

7.  I think Apple has the most nicest displays on the market.  I suspect they are trying to get a 4K display put together that's worthy of the Apple brand.  The new iMac screens are gorgeous.  Having Retina on such a huge display is not a deal-breaker for me.  Macbook Air would be nice to have. 

post #38 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

Who cares? The Mac has never been in a marketshare war and never will be. In terms of bottom line, it's almost irrelevant. I expect Macs will get a boost once hardware and software is updated this fall, not to mention the increased halo effect from the better synergy between iOS8 and Yosemite. 

LOL you have an answer for everything that goes against Apple.

Apple blew it on the TV. I'm a proud owner of a new 49" 4K Sony TV as of July 3rd and am loving it. 

And the Surface seems very appealing. I would never buy or recommend  a Samsung/Google product but I could certainly recommend a Surface to anyone who refuses to buy Apple.

 
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Where's the new Apple TV?
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post #39 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


Lots of people are waiting on Apple to do a decent upgrade to all of its Mac products. here are a few things Apple has done that are worthless:

1. made the iMac thinner
2. made the iMac next to impossible to upgrade.
3. ignored the Mini and the fantastic potential the latest chips could have on that platform.
4. updated the AIR and didn't bother to update the SSD to higher capacity devices at each price point. This actually boggles the mind.
5. left the line up in limbo with some platforms supporting TB fully and others not.
6. ignored competing i86 hardware that would have been a good fit in the Mini.
7. ignored the display market.

Totally agree. I have a 2013 iMac and cannot believe the screen uses 5 year old technology.

 
Where's the new Apple TV?
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Where's the new Apple TV?
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post #40 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post

Totally agree. I have a 2013 iMac and cannot believe the screen uses 5 year old technology.

The 2013 iMac is using technology from 2008? Shut the **** up!

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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