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Apple doled out more than $3B to over 7,000 US suppliers in 2013

post #1 of 80
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After announcing cooperation with the White House's "SupplierPay" initiative, Apple on Friday released domestic supply chain expenditure figures for the first time, saying it spent more than $3 billion with over 7,000 U.S. suppliers last year.

Mac Pro
Metal Impact, a small Illinois-based company, supplies Apple with aluminum casings for the Mac Pro.


The numbers, along with some backstory on the small company responsible for the Mac Pro's aluminum enclosure, were revealed in a statement provided to TechCrunch following SVP of Operations Jeff Williams' meeting with President Barack Obama over the "SupplierPay" initiative.

"Last year, Apple spent more than $3 billion with over 7,000 suppliers running small and diverse businesses, creating tens of thousands of U.S. jobs," Apple said.

The White House earlier on Friday released a statement of its own announcing the program meant to stimulate small business financing. Highlighted in that report were several case studies, including Apple and Metal Impact, which supplies aluminum enclosures for the Mac Pro.

Describing the Mac Pro, which is the first Apple product to be assembled in the U.S. in more than a decade, the company said it managed to create 18 new jobs at Metal Impact and drove millions of dollars in revenue to the Illinois-based firm.

"The first thing customers notice when they look at a Mac Pro is the revolutionary cylindrical aluminum enclosure which comes from Metal Impact, a small company in Elk Grove Village, Illinois," Apple said in its statement. "Alongside their team we created an entirely new process and supply chain, conducting more than 40 experiments with ten different alloys on multiple aluminum mills."

Aside from tapping Flextronics in Austin, Texas, to assemble the Mac Pro, Apple says it uses "dozens" of component and equipment suppliers from 23 states.

SupplierPay is an offshoot of QuickPay, a government program that requires the federal government to pay small contractors within 15 days of receiving an invoice. Both programs are meant to cut down on loan interest payments, which should ultimately free up capital for reinvestment. The private sector version is backed by 26 companies, including Apple.

"For the larger companies, joining SupplierPay demonstrates a recognition that a healthy supply chain is good for business," the White House said. "For the small business suppliers, benefiting from SupplierPay means having more capital to invest in new opportunities, new equipment, and new hiring."
post #2 of 80
Oh no! The White House and by implication, Obama, was mentioned in the article. Now an otherwise positive good news story has turned to shit. Everybody's being taken for a ride! The government is trying to screw you! Don't be fooled¡
post #3 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Oh no! The White House and by implication, Obama, was mentioned in the article. Now an otherwise positive good news story has turned to shit. Everybody's being taken for a ride! The government is trying to screw you! Don't be fooled¡

I agree that most governments around the world, including this one (America), is trying to 'screw' it's people. That's kinda what the power hungry governments do. 

post #4 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Oh no! The White House and by implication, Obama, was mentioned in the article. Now an otherwise positive good news story has turned to shit. Everybody's being taken for a ride! The government is trying to screw you! Don't be fooled¡

I got the intended sarcasm, but for many of us your comment reads as true.

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post #5 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I got the intended sarcasm, but for many of us your comment reads as true.

And that's the problem really. It's a really simple,voluntary, initiative to get some cash flow for some suppliers and it will get some good press for Apple. It will. That such a simple thing could cause people to see a sarcastic rant like paxman gave as something other than gibberish is silly. This is exactly like the republicans in congress. I haven't heard a single credible thing wrong with this program except it will also give Obama some good press. And we sure can't have that now can we?
post #6 of 80
Doled out? Bad reportage, AI. This was payment for work, not charity. Please end the sensational headlines.
post #7 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDavid View Post

And that's the problem really. It's a really simple,voluntary, initiative to get some cash flow for some suppliers and it will get some good press for Apple. It will. That such a simple thing could cause people to see a sarcastic rant like paxman gave as something other than gibberish is silly. This is exactly like the republicans in congress. I haven't heard a single credible thing wrong with this program except it will also give Obama some good press. And we sure can't have that now can we?

No, sadly we can't as long as so many get all their opinions and talking points from the biased ends of the news media (either end). The total lack of ability to have any intelligent dialog and compromise is a result, IMHO, of the gradual, yet ever increasing polarization of the masses' thinking brought about by media manipulation over the last 20 years. I heard an astounding radio interview the other day when a certain politician stated, 'he would never compromise on any issue whatever it is ... that isn't what he was elected to do.' I rest my case. 1oyvey.gif
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post #8 of 80

To bad some of that money Apple doled up could have gone to the illegal children coming to the states.

post #9 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by y2an View Post

Doled out? Bad reportage, AI. This was payment for work, not charity. Please end the sensational headlines.

I could be wrong and I don't know where you are based, but I suspect in the UK you would be correct in that interpretation because of the old germanic verb's use in that context for many years. I suspect Americans simply use it in the older sense meaning to distribute as their usage dates back before the UK use changed to be associated with Government help.

Many words from the English retain older meanings here in the USA whereas they have morphed into newer meanings in the UK. The US use of the old meanings of 'faucet, spigot and tap' in the relevant contexts as did the English back in the day, being the most obvious I can think of, whereas in the UK that's now gone and 'tap' now fulfills the meaning for faucet, spigot and tap.
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post #10 of 80
So Apple did this without a government initiative?
post #11 of 80

$3 billion divided by 7000 vendors is only $428,571 average per vendor.  That's not really a lot of money, especially if one considers that the "top" vendors probably got most of the money which means that the bottom 3500 probably got only $100,000-$150,000 worth of business from Apple. 

post #12 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

 I heard an astounding radio interview the other day when a certain politician stated, 'he would never compromise on any issue whatever it is ... that isn't what he was elected to do.' I rest my case. 1oyvey.gif

 

Seems to me that politicians are elected to accomplish something, not just to pontificate, especially if they're a legislator.  And if you are a legislator and you're unwilling to compromise, it's unlikely that you can get a single bill passed, even in a situation where your own party dominates.   So that's a recipe for doing exactly nothing except for being a loudmouth and "rallying the troops".   And it's our own fault because people don't want their legislators to compromise, but then they also complain that Congress isn't accomplishing anything.   In our macho society, compromise is seen as weakness.    But in a way, it's good, because extremists like the Tea Party would be far more successful nationally if they were willing to compromise.    

 

What bothers me about such politicians in the House and Senate (as well as citizens in general) is that they don't seem to understand the history of their own country because they don't seen to know that the two chambers were themselves a 1787 compromise between those who wanted representation by population (the larger states) and those who wanted each state to have equal representation (the smaller states).   If it weren't for that compromise, proposed by Connecticut delegate Roger Sherman, the U.S. may have never come into existence as a democracy.         

 

Obama's approval rating has averaged 48% during his terms in office, which is lower than Nixon or Bush (although Bush had a 71% disapproval rating near the end of this term - Obama's highest disapproval was 55%, in 2011).  But according to Gallup, Congress' approval rating (taken in May) was far lower:   15% approval and 80% disapproval (and it was only 9% approval last November).    That's what the unwillingness to compromise gets you.    And yet, in the upcoming elections, my bet is that more politicians who are unwilling to compromise get elected, especially in the House, but even in the Senate.  

post #13 of 80


Bad analysis. Simple math doesn't tell the whole story. For some small suppliers, half a million dollars is a tremendous amount of business and probably was welcome new business allowing them to add an employee or two.

post #14 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDavid View Post

And that's the problem really. It's a really simple,voluntary, initiative to get some cash flow for some suppliers and it will get some good press for Apple. It will. That such a simple thing could cause people to see a sarcastic rant like paxman gave as something other than gibberish is silly. This is exactly like the republicans in congress. I haven't heard a single credible thing wrong with this program except it will also give Obama some good press. And we sure can't have that now can we?

Perhaps I could've been more clear in my comment. His statement seemed like a real opinion because of the dangers this president and Congress have delivered upon our country by actively dismantling our constitutionally protected freedoms and the gross expansion of the powers of the president. There is nothing funny about what's happening in Washington.

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post #15 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by y2an View Post

Doled out? Bad reportage, AI. This was payment for work, not charity. Please end the sensational headlines.

Sorry, you are wrong.

 

AppleInsider is written in American English. Here is the definition of dole (the verb) per the Dictionary application on OS X Mavericks:

 

"distribute shares of something"

 

Note that the default dictionary for Macs in the USA is the New Oxford American Dictionary 3rd edition © 2010, 2012 by Oxford University Press. You can see this if you run Dictionary > Preferences ... and are running your Mac as US English as the primary language.

 

The dictionary definition also shows the noun "dole" itself has a British informal usage of unemployment benefits.

 

If you do not want to diddle with your Mac's default language settings, you can view the exact same definition right here:

 

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/dole?q=dole

 

You should realize that different words may have different meanings and some connotations present as a noun may not be present in a verb, especially when there are regional colloquialisms involved.

 

Now if AppleInsider were a British website and written in British English, you would have a case. Here, you do not.

 

Could AppleInsider have done a better job in writing their headline? Absolutely. Many of their headlines are poorly authored. Clearly, they could have chosen other words that would have eliminated confusion, like replacing "doled out" with "distributed," "dispersed," or "paid."

 

However, the fact of the matter is you accused them of implying something when you yourself did not bother to look up the definition of the word in question.


Edited by mpantone - 7/12/14 at 8:49am
post #16 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

Sorry, you are wrong.

 

AppleInsider is written in American English. Here is the definition of dole (the verb) per the Dictionary application on OS X Mavericks:

 

"distribute shares of something"

One could argue that "distribute shares" implies that the vendors are sharing a royalty, profit, dividend or stock distribution.   That's clearly not the case here.    They're not sharing anything.   They're getting paid based upon a contracted price and it wasn't as if Apple said that they're going to deal with only X number of vendors, which would also imply a share.    So I have to agree with those who think that "doles" was not the best word to use, although I don't see any need to get upset or defensive about it either way, as you seem to be.   At worst, it was slightly sloppy use of language. 

post #17 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

Sorry, you are wrong.

 

AppleInsider is written in American English. Here is the definition of dole (the verb) per the Dictionary application on OS X Mavericks:

 

"distribute shares of something"

 

Note that the default dictionary for Macs in the USA is the New Oxford American Dictionary 3rd edition © 2010, 2012 by Oxford University Press. You can see this if you run Dictionary > Preferences ... and are running your Mac as US English as the primary language.

 

The dictionary definition also shows the noun "dole" itself has a British informal usage of unemployment benefits.

 

If you do not want to diddle with your Mac's default language settings, you can view the exact same definition right here:

 

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/dole?q=dole

 

You should realize that different words may have different meanings and some connotations present as a noun may not be present in a verb, especially when there are regional colloquialisms involved.

 

Now if AppleInsider were a British website and written in British English, you would have a case. Here, you do not.

 

Could AppleInsider have done a better job in writing their headline? Absolutely. Many of their headlines are poorly authored. Clearly, they could have chosen other words that would have eliminated confusion, like replacing "doled out" with "distributed," "dispersed," or "paid."

 

However, the fact of the matter is you accused them of implying something when you yourself did not bother to look up the definition of the word in question.

true but  the noun version of this 'on the dole' is common lexicon (at least for me.) in this Fox News Hot Word Headline time we live in.

Like using 'Welfare' instead of 'Aid to Families with Dependent Children' (the official term for it), it holds a certain negative connotation.

Welfare takes those children out of the picture.

 

And even the meaning 'distribute shares of something' (profits/fractional sharing of holdings)  doesn't quite jive with "gotten paid for services/goods received"

 

So, to the letter of the semantics police code, yes, the word 'dole' CAN be used here in the US specific definitions, but in the spirit of conveying meaning appropriate to the action, there are better words than that 'doled out'

 

'Acquired Goods and Services worth'

'Paid-out'

'Spent'

'disbursed' (2nd meaning, M-W)

'Injected into the U.S. Economy'

post #18 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post
 

$3 billion divided by 7000 vendors is only $428,571 average per vendor.  That's not really a lot of money, especially if one considers that the "top" vendors probably got most of the money which means that the bottom 3500 probably got only $100,000-$150,000 worth of business from Apple. 

 

Exactly.  Political/corporate PR and window dressing.  Our gov't.  can claim to be doing something supportive of small business (while their overall policies are doing much more to crush it). 

And given the "corporatism" and pandering to big contributors rampant in both parties, while the left and right do so in different ways, "the little guys" are still caught in the middle...

And Apple's experiences - going back to Greenpeace and later the Foxconn worker suicide stories (among many others where Apple gets more negative attention for things done by many companies) have led them to have much more sensitivity to their image.

I'm not saying they're insincere about this, and think that they really have become interested in environmentalism, working conditions at their suppliers and thinking local, still, there's a PR component and this really is just a drop in the bucket.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by mike1 View Post
 

Bad analysis. Simple math doesn't tell the whole story. For some small suppliers, half a million dollars is a tremendous amount of business and probably was welcome new business allowing them to add an employee or two.

 

Nothing inherently wrong about this, and yeah, hopefully some benefit in ways that matter.  And with lots of luck (given all the counter-trends from the same smiling parties), perhaps the "butterfly wing effect" will revive the US SMB tech sector in the areas mostly lost to Asian suppliers.

Still, just stuff that should have been being done all along without all the chest-pounding and "look how cool we are" bits by both the gov't and participating corps.  

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post #19 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

One could argue that "distribute shares" implies that the vendors are sharing a royalty, profit, dividend or stock distribution.   That's clearly not the case here.    They're not sharing anything.   They're getting paid based upon a contracted price and it wasn't as if Apple said that they're going to deal with only X number of vendors, which would also imply a share.    So I have to agree with those who think that "doles" was not the best word to use, although I don't see any need to get upset or defensive about it either way, as you seem to be.   At worst, it was slightly sloppy use of language. 

What your inferring isn't implied. The term doled out is common in the US and refers generally to being paid what's due. It has no connotation of government money.
post #20 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


No, sadly we can't as long as so many get all their opinions and talking points from the biased ends of the news media (either end). The total lack of ability to have any intelligent dialog and compromise is a result, IMHO, of the gradual, yet ever increasing polarization of the masses' thinking brought about by media manipulation over the last 20 years. I heard an astounding radio interview the other day when a certain politician stated, 'he would never compromise on any issue whatever it is ... that isn't what he was elected to do.' I rest my case. 1oyvey.gif

 

I agree until the last statement as some politicians are sent not to compromise, but to block. In some cases this is acceptable on both ends as there are some issues where no compromise exists. 

post #21 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 

So, to the letter of the semantics police code, yes, the word 'dole' CAN be used here in the US specific definitions, but in the spirit of conveying meaning appropriate to the action, there are better words than that 'doled out'

Let's reiterate that AppleInsider is a US website written in American English

 

As I mentioned earlier, yes, AI could have chosen different words, resulting in a better headline and less confusing prose. They did not, so we are stuck with poor but correct writing.

 

Remember, true journalism died in the Nineties.

post #22 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

I agree until the last statement as some politicians are sent not to compromise, but to block. In some cases this is acceptable on both ends as there are some issues where no compromise exists. 

If you think about it though, to start out by stating you will never compromise, your modus operandi is 'my way or no way'. That is basically the thinking of a dictatorial system not a democracy. To me it is ironic that those that want only there way use the democratic system to try to gain power. History is replete with examples where such people succeeded and it isn't pretty.
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post #23 of 80
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post
I heard an astounding radio interview the other day when a certain politician stated, 'he would never compromise on any issue whatever it is ... that isn't what he was elected to do.' I rest my case. 1oyvey.gif

 

What case? What’s wrong with that? Imagine a constituency that is overwhelmingly in favor of [thing]. We’re talking 60% or so, with the rest not being opposed to it in its entirety, just its scope. It would be wrong of the elected official to go against [thing] in that case. He would be doing his job properly to not compromise on [thing].

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post #24 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

What case? What’s wrong with that? Imagine a constituency that is overwhelmingly in favor of [thing]. We’re talking 60% or so, with the rest not being opposed to it in its entirety, just its scope. It would be wrong of the elected official to go against [thing] in that case. He would be doing his job properly to not compromise on [thing].

Perhaps we are seeing this from different view points. To me, starting out by saying everything has to be my way or I will stop anything happening is just not what democracy is all about. I would feel this whatever the position on the political spectrum the person saying this came from. Instead of 'compromise' which certain media outlets have changed to mean something else, perhaps the term 'reaching a consensus' would be better to use.
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post #25 of 80
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post
…starting out by saying everything has to be my way or I will stop anything happening is just not what democracy is all about.


Sure, but that’s not what I’m saying. If you mean “stop anything happening” in regard to the scope of the effects of [thing] as previously mentioned, that’s just the official doing his job. But “anything” as in anything is different.

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post #26 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So Apple did this without a government initiative?

Aren't tax breaks a government initiative? In fact isn't anything the government does by definition a government initiative?

post #27 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

 

I agree until the last statement as some politicians are sent not to compromise, but to block. In some cases this is acceptable on both ends as there are some issues where no compromise exists. 

Except the blocking has gone down at an unprecedented level ( on just about everything) including a record number of Filibusters. Isn't it congresses' responsibility to write bills or at least negotiate a compromise? Including aid to veterans, relief on student loans, pay as you go ( an idea that Republicans proposed the President Agreed, Republicans killed the idea. The Republican party cannot even vote for it's own ideas or initiatives. They are a party with no vision for the country. They have become a marketing firm with their own TV station. They are the least productive Congress in our history & if they didn't gerrymander districts & try to mess with voting rights they would not be in charge of the country. The President won not only the electoral college but also the popular vote. Democrats also won the popular vote for Congress nationwide by almost 500,000 votes. Now they are suing the President & wasting taxpayer's money for a change to the AAC that they wanted the President to make & that they overwhelmingly voted for. Tragic joke.

 

United States Presidents issue executive orders to help officers and agencies of the executive branch manage the operations within the federal government itself. Executive orders have the full force of law when they take authority from a power granted directly to the Executive by the Constitution, or are made in pursuance of certain Acts of Congress that explicitly delegate to the President some degree of discretionary power (delegated legislation). Like statutes or regulations promulgated by government agencies, executive orders are subject to judicial review, and may be struck down if deemed by the courts to be unsupported by statute or the Constitution. Major policy initiatives usually require approval by the legislative branch, but executive orders have significant influence over the internal affairs of government, deciding how and to what degree laws will be enforced, dealing with emergencies, waging war, and in general fine policy choices in the implementation of broad statutes.


Edited by Splif - 7/12/14 at 12:23pm
post #28 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Perhaps I could've been more clear in my comment. His statement seemed like a real opinion because of the dangers this president and Congress have delivered upon our country by actively dismantling our constitutionally protected freedoms and the gross expansion of the powers of the president. There is nothing funny about what's happening in Washington.

You were pretty clear. I thought I was too but I'll try again. This small initiative has little chance of increasing "the dangers this president and congress have delivered upon our country" or of helping to "actively dismantle our constitutionally protected freedoms". This isn't about a "gross expansion of the powers of the president". Running around like your hair is on fire when a reasonable proposal is made is the silly part.

At least this is a tiny bit less time that he can devote to personally destroying all things good as we know it.
post #29 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Sure, but that’s not what I’m saying. If you mean “stop anything happening” in regard to the scope of the effects of [thing] as previously mentioned, that’s just the official doing his job. But “anything” as in anything is different.

I think we agree ...
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post #30 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splif View Post

Aren't tax breaks a government initiative? In fact isn't anything the government does by definition a government initiative?
I don't follow. My point was Apple is doing this on their own without needing the White House or anyone else in government to tell them to do so. Same thing with accessibility features for the disabled. If something is a good idea companies will adopt the idea because at the end of the day they want satisfied customers (that are more likely to do business with them). This includes B2B customers.

What I'd like to know is why isn't Amazon on this list? Aren't they notorious for getting paid a lot faster than they pay their suppliers?
post #31 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


I don't follow. My point was Apple is doing this on their own without needing the White House or anyone else in government to tell them to do so. Same thing with accessibility features for the disabled. If something is a good idea companies will adopt the idea because at the end of the day they want satisfied customers (that are more likely to do business with them). This includes B2B customers.

What I'd like to know is why isn't Amazon on this list? Aren't they notorious for getting paid a lot faster than they pay their suppliers?

Sorry if I misunderstood....but how does anyone garner that from this statement. "So Apple did this without a government initiative?" Who are you asking this question to? 

post #32 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

What I'd like to know is why isn't Amazon on this list? Aren't they notorious for getting paid a lot faster than they pay their suppliers?

We have already discussed this. Ask Amazon if you want a definitive answer. The US government isn't going to explain why Company X wasn't invited to be part of this charter effort. And even if you ask Amazon, they might not know a specific reason. It is entirely possible that the only answer you will get is that administration selected a group of companies that did not include Company X.

 

It is pretty clear that the administration is focusing on really big companies, like Dow 30 components. Apple isn't a Dow component, but they have the largest market cap, making it a peer of the other Dow components. Amazon is nowhere near being a Dow 30 component.

 

Remember, this is a voluntary program, however it would be most effective if the biggest companies say "yes, I'm for this" to convince others to act similarly. Sure, the little mom-and-pop coffee shop could be part of the program, but their participation will not have the same influence as Big Business.

 

Even if Apple was already doing this on their own, the point of this program is to showcase Big Companies as leaders who are committed to this practice of taking care of their smaller suppliers. 


Edited by mpantone - 7/12/14 at 3:34pm
post #33 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 

Let's reiterate that AppleInsider is a US website written in American English

 

As I mentioned earlier, yes, AI could have chosen different words, resulting in a better headline and less confusing prose. They did not, so we are stuck with poor but correct writing.

 

Remember, true journalism died in the Nineties.

It's read internationally, and written in bombastic English;-).  

 

But I was more in defense of the poster, not attacking the site.  I grew up in the corn belt, and my non-Canadian grandfather used 'on the dole' frequently.

 

just last week:   http://news.yahoo.com/off-dole-job-ben-carson-090000195.html

2 years ago http://nypost.com/2012/02/13/on-the-dole-a-fifth-of-all-americans/

 

These are american sites using dole as 'a handout'

 

and MSN used it again as receiving more than you are due.   http://money.msn.com/investing/10-states-on-the-federal-dole

 

So, while the American Dictionary seems to avoid using the term as 'handing-out,'  American press has not not gotten that memo and use it as a 'weighted' term.

 

I suppose some boffins have an explanation for that ( ;-) )

post #34 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

We have already discussed this. Ask Amazon if you want a definitive answer. Tompanies as leaders who are committed to this practice of taking care of their smaller suppliers. 
Amazon has the reputation of delaying payments to vendors/suppliers as part of their business plan. Walmart used to be the same but reportedly have improved in the years since I stopped supplying graphics/signage to them.
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post #35 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Amazon has the reputation of delaying payments to vendors/suppliers as part of their business plan. Walmart used to be the same but reportedly have improved in the years since I stopped supplying graphics/signage to them.

Sounds like you taught them a lesson there. 1biggrin.gif
post #36 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 

So, while the American Dictionary seems to avoid using the term as 'handing-out,'  American press has not not gotten that memo and use it as a 'weighted' term.

As I have repeatedly mentioned, true journalism died in the Nineties.

 

:D

post #37 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Amazon has the reputation of delaying payments to vendors/suppliers as part of their business plan. Walmart used to be the same but reportedly have improved in the years since I stopped supplying graphics/signage to them.

Well, you are clearly the authority here about Amazon and Walmart business practices vis-a-vis your own business.

 

That said, it still doesn't change the fact that you need to ask Amazon themselves why they aren't part of this new voluntary initiative from the White House.

 

And thanks for kicking Walmart to the curb! Well done, carry on!

post #38 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

As I have repeatedly mentioned, true journalism died in the Nineties.

1biggrin.gif

I believe Murdoch actually started a lot earlier than that.
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #39 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


If you think about it though, to start out by stating you will never compromise, your modus operandi is 'my way or no way'. That is basically the thinking of a dictatorial system not a democracy. To me it is ironic that those that want only there way use the democratic system to try to gain power. History is replete with examples where such people succeeded and it isn't pretty.

 

Yeah, no. You are thinking this too far. There are simply items in which there is no compromise only because the differences the two sides have. That does not mean one or the other wants to be a dictatorship, although that would be fun for a day ;) 

 

There are many topics in which people just don't agree, which is the reason for electing your own people to office. If not, we would simply hold a lottery. 

 

I don't want to list the obvious differences as to not start a firestorm of opinions, but we all know of what we think that the other side is, well, completely on the other side. 

post #40 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splif View Post
 

Except the blocking has gone down at an unprecedented level ( on just about everything) including a record number of Filibusters. Isn't it congresses' responsibility to write bills or at least negotiate a compromise?

 

Not sure where it is written Congress is suppose to negotiate. Actually, the branches was set up as to slow down the progress of government, not increase it. 

 

 

Quote:
 Including aid to veterans, relief on student loans, pay as you go ( an idea that Republicans proposed the President Agreed, Republicans killed the idea. The Republican party cannot even vote for it's own ideas or initiatives. They are a party with no vision for the country. They have become a marketing firm with their own TV station.

 

Hmm

 

Quote:
 They are the least productive Congress in our history & if they didn't gerrymander districts & try to mess with voting rights they would not be in charge of the country.

 

You do know the repubs only control 1/3 of the government, don't you? 

 

Quote:
  The President won not only the electoral college but also the popular vote. Democrats also won the popular vote for Congress nationwide by almost 500,000 votes. Now they are suing the President & wasting taxpayer's money for a change to the AAC that they wanted the President to make & that they overwhelmingly voted for. Tragic joke.

 

You are not suggesting that this president is one of compromise? One to reach across the way and sit down with the other side to get things done? If you talk about my way or the highway, Obama is by far the leader in that chant. 

 

The entire government is messed up, and those like yourself who ONLY see your side, attributes to what you are complaining about. You only want the other side to capitulate to your. An honest look at all of government and you will see it fails completely, and that includes completely! 

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